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Past

28 October – 11 December

Where are the Originals? Once were photographs… Peter Lyssiotis

Where are the Originals? slows down the frantic pace of photography in the modern era, pausing for a breath in our rush to capture every moment by taking an over-the-shoulder look at photography and interrogating it.  Amongst other things this exhibition posits the view that once an idea has been stretched, almost to breaking point, it will return inevitably to the original.

Lyssiotis' process of scratching, erasing, sanding and over drawing an existing image is a way of drawing those photographs, which have been made and already reproduced back to their essence… light.  So that the immediacy of photography goes arm-in-arm with the meditative nature of drawing.

Based on two series of works, "Men of Flowers" and "… & Now?" these works look at the challenge of making visible that which the initial photographer has not foreseen, revealing, in the process, what was hidden in the original, with a view, always, to reach for those unexpected levels of poetry (and perhaps humour). 

Curated by Leanne Willis

Lyssiotis ..Now I

Image caption:

Peter Lyssiotis, … & now? I, 2009, giclee print, 108 x 80 cm, Deakin University Art Collection, 2013.18. Purchase 2013. Photographer Simon Peter Fox.


George Gittoes: I Witness 

18 February - 5 April 2015

George Gittoes: I Witness is the first major survey in Australia of the work of leading Australian artist and filmmaker George Gittoes.  Gittoes is a nationally significant and internationally recognised Australian artist best known for creating works in regions of conflict and upheaval around the world including Rwanda, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq. Known for working in areas of international conflict, here Gittoes sharpens his eye around the moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions of being human.

Curated for Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre by Rod Pattenden, George Gittoes: I Witness presents the major themes explored throughout Gittoes' 40 year career with a diverse body of work that includes paintings, drawings, printmaking, artist diaries from the fields of war, installation and film. It is drawn from the artist's and other private collections with many works never having been seen publically in Australia.A Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre touring exhibition.

 

Hazelhurst Regional Gallery %26 Arts Centre, Sutherland Shire Council

A Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre touring exhibition

George Gittoes: I WitnessGeorge Gittoes at Occupy Wall Street, 2011.
Photo: Zony Maya.

 


28 April - 29 May

FOUND IN TRANSLATION: DEAKIN UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY is part of Gosia Wlodarczak's ongoing Instruction Drawing project. Taking a drawing produced during a residency at the Western Washington University Art Gallery in 2012 as her starting point, Wlodarczak has developed two pictorial alphabets, each letter of the English alphabet represented by a small detail of this drawing.

Using these pictorial alphabets, Wlodarczak has created a series of three site-specific wall drawings, each containing encoded texts. The first has been completed by the artist; the second, by Deakin University Art Gallery staff using a manual provided by the artist, INSTRUCTION FOR THE MAKER; and the third will be a collaboration with visitors to the exhibition. Texts selected by the artist and University staff, which relate to project and to the specific context of the University setting, are encoded within two of the drawings, which may be decoded using a set of instructions provided by the artist:  INSTRUCTION FOR THE VIEWER. Visitors to the exhibition are invited to contribute a word to the project, which the artist will translate into a third wall drawing during a four day residency from 28 April to 1 May, culminating in a collaborative concrete poem.

Gosia Wlodarczak extends the practice of drawing in performative, interactive and conceptual projects that respond to her direct environment and explore the idea of drawing and language being coded modes of communication.

Read more about the exhibition in this essay by Curator, Emma Busowsky Cox. (PDF, 699.1 KB)

FOUND IN TRANSLATION DEAKIN UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY Gosia WlodarczakGosia Wlodarczak installing FOUND IN TRANSLATION, Interpretation Drawing #2: SIGNS, 2015
Deakin University Art Gallery
Photo: Longin Sarneci


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