Prof Don Thomson

STAFF PROFILE

Position

Professor

Faculty

Faculty of Health

Department

School of Psychology

Campus

Melbourne Burwood Campus

Contact

Publications

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2014

Opening up a can of worms: how do decision-makers decide when witnesses are telling the truth?

Adj/Prof Ian Coyle, Prof Don Thomson

(2014), Vol. 21, pp. 475-491, Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, London, Eng., C1

journal
2013

Does free recall moderate the effect of mental context reinstatement instructions on children's cued recall?

Dr Paul Dietze, Dr Stefanie Sharman, Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2013), Vol. 19, pp. 881-891, Psychology, crime and law, Abingdon, Eng., C1

journal
2012

Examination of the effect of mental reinstatement of context acress developmental level, retention interval and type of mnemonic instruction

Dr Paul Dietze, Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2012), Vol. 19, pp. 89-103, Psychiatry, psychology and law, Oxon, England, C1

journal
2011

Context reinstatement effects in children’s cued recall of strongly and weakly associated word pairs

Dr Paul Dietze, Dr Stefanie Sharman, Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2011), Vol. 28, pp. 91-100, Australian educational and developmental psychologist, Nedlands, W.A., C1

journal
2010

An analysis of police officers decisions about whether to refer cases of child abuse for prosecution

Prof Martine Powell, Ms Romana Calder, Prof Don Thomson

(2010), Vol. 16, pp. 715-724, Psychology, crime & law, London, England, C1

journal

Mental reinstatement of context with child witnesses : does it matter whether context is reinstated 'out loud'?

Dr Paul Dietze, Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2010), Vol. 16, pp. 439-448, Psychology crime and law, Basingstoke, England, C1

journal
2007

The impact of experienced versus non-experienced suggestions on children's recall of repeated events

Prof Martine Powell, A/Prof Kim Roberts, Prof Don Thomson, Stephen J. Ceci

(2007), Vol. 21, pp. 649-667, Applied cognitive psychology, New York, N.Y., C1

journal

How well does the gudjonsson suggestibility scale for children, version 2 predict the recall of false details among children with and without intellectual disabilities?

Miss Katie Miles, Prof Martine Powell, Gilles E. Gignac, Prof Don Thomson

(2007), Vol. 12, pp. 217-232, Legal and criminological psychology, Leicester, England, C1

journal
2003

Children's memory of recurring events: is the first event always the best remembered?

Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson, Stephen J. Ceci

(2003), Vol. 17, pp. 127-146, Applied cognitive psychology, Chichester, England, C1

journal

The effect of contextual cues on children`s ability to remember an occurence of a repeated event

Miss Sarah Pearse, Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2003), Vol. 8, pp. 39-50, Legal and criminological psychology, Leicester, England, C1

journal

Improving children's recall of an occurrence of a repeated event: is it a matter of helping them to generate options?

Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2003), Vol. 27, pp. 365-384, Law and human behavior, New York, N.Y., C1

journal

Do simple "groundrules" reduce preschoolers' suggestibility about experienced and nonexperienced events?

Lisa M. Ellis, Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson, Dr Carolyn Hughes-Scholes

(2003), Vol. 10, pp. 334-345, Psychiatry, psychology, and law : an interdisciplinary journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law., Melbourne, Vic., C1

journal
2002

Eliciting children's recall of events: how do computers compare with humans?

Prof Martine Powell, Dr Clare Wilson, Prof Don Thomson

(2002), Vol. 18, pp. 297-313, Computers in human behavior, New York, N.Y., C1

journal
2001

The makings of a reliable interview with a child witness

Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2001), Vol. 18, pp. 25-38, Australian educational and developmental psychologist, Parkville, Vic., C1-1

journal

Children`s memories for repeated events

Prof Martine Powell, Prof Don Thomson

(2001), pp. 69-82, Children`s testimony: a handbook of psychological research and forensic practice, New York, N.Y., B1

chapter