Dr Wei-Peng Teo

STAFF PROFILE

Position

Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Faculty

Faculty of Health

Department

School of Exercise & Nut. Sci.

Campus

Melbourne Burwood Campus

Qualifications

Bachelor of Science, Edith Cowan University, 2007
Master of Science, Edith Cowan University, 2009
Doctor of Philosophy, Univ. of Western Australia, 2014

Biography

I am currently an early-career academic/researcher with the focus of further developing my research experience in the area of neurorehabilitation. I am particularly interested in the use of non-invasive brain stimulation to prime the brain so as to maximise rehabilitation outcomes for Parkinson's disease and Stroke.

My research focus stems from my doctoral work which examined the neural correlates of movement rate and amplitude in healthy subjects and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Amongst the cardinal signs of Parkinson’s disease, bradykinesia and hypokinesia present as the most easily recognisable signs and is usually apparent before any formal neurological assessment is made. This often results in slowness of movement and resulting in a reduction in activities of daily living. My research suggests that an increased state of brain hyperexcitability and a reduction in cortical inhibition in the primary motor cortex plays a significant role in both bradykinesia and hypokinesia. Additional findings also indicate that both bradykinesia and hypokinesia have distinct neural mechanisms that are affected differently by levodopa medication.

Following the completion of my doctoral thesis, I worked as a research fellow at the National University Hospital in Singapore investigating the efficacy of non-invasive brain stimulation and robotic training in chronic stroke patients. The concept of this study was based on a two-tiered approach targeting the central nervous system using non-invasive brain stimulation  and providing sensory feedback through manipulation of the affect limb using a robotic arm.

Read more on Wei-Peng's profile

Biography summary

Dr Teo’s is an early-career researcher with a research focus on developing novel rehabilitation strategies to optimising neuromuscular function and brain health. Dr Teo graduated with a PhD in 2013 from the University of Western Australia under the supervision of Professors Gary Thickbroom and Frank Mastaglia. Currently, Dr Teo’s research focus includes the use of non-invasive brain stimulation, exercise and virtual reality therapy to improve motor and cognitive function in people with neurological disorders (i.e. Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease) and stroke. He has expertise in various techniques to measure brain function that includes electroencephalography (EEG), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and leads a team consisting of 6 PhD and 1 Master postgraduate students.

Career highlights

1. Awarded the Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellowship ($160,000, 2016-2017)
2. Awarded the Heart Foundation Vanguard Grant ($75,000, 2017)

Research interests

Dr Teo’s research interests include:
1. How motor learning and control adapt across the lifespan and in clinical conditions such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease and stroke.
2. How the brain controls gait and balance across the lifespan.
3. Understanding mechanisms that drive neuroplasticity in healthy and clinical populations.

Affiliations

Dr Teo is currently a member of the following organisations:

1. National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)
2. Exercise is Medicine Singapore (EIMS)

Teaching interests

  1. Motor learning and skill acquisition
  2. Motor control
  3. Resistance training
  4. Movement disorders
  5. Neurorehabilitation

Units taught

1. HSE204 – Motor learning and development
2. HSE702 – Exercise physiology for neurological and neuromuscular disorders

Conferences

Invited conference presentations:
1. Sports Medicine Association Singapore. “Effects of exercise on cognition: how can we optimise brain health as we age.” 7th May 2016
2. Booronia Stroke Support Group. “Using commercially-available virtual games to support stroke rehabilitation in the home setting”. 15th Sept 2015
3. Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health. “Non-invasive brain stimulation and exercise in neurorehabilitation: evidence from healthy subjects”. 30th Aug 2015
4. Movement 2 Health (M2H) laboratory, University of Montpellier. “Using technology to augment stroke rehabilitation”. 4th June 2015

Conference presentations
1. Teo WP. Muthalib M, Colier W. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a means to measure brain activity during neurorehabilitation. 16th World Congress of Active Ageing, 28th June 2016, Melbourne
2. Teo WP, Muthalib M, Frazer A, Hendy A, Goodwill A, Perrey S. Ipsilateral M1 transcranial direct current stimulation increases excitability of the contralateral M1 during an active motor task: implications for stroke rehabilitation. 30th Congres de Societe Francaise de Medicine Physique et de Readaptation (SOFMER), 8th October 2015, Montpellier France.
3. Teo WP, Muthalib M, Kidgell DJ. Modulation of corticospinal excitability and inhibition of the contralateral M1 during and after ipsilateral anodal tDCS. 1st International Brain Stimulation Conference, 2nd March 2015, Singapore.
4. Hendy AM, Teo WP, Kidgell DJ. Anodal tDCS prolongs the cross-education of strength and corticospinal plasticity. 1st International Brain Stimulation Conference, 2nd March 2015, Singapore.
5. Teo WP, Zhao L, Chew E, Ang KK, Phua, KS, Wang CC, Guan C. Brain-computer interface robotic training and non-invasive brain stimulation for stroke rehabilitation: possibility or virtual reality? Australian Physiological Society, 8th December 2013, Geelong Victoria.
6. Ang KK, Guan, C, Phua KS, Wang C, Zhao L, Teo WP, Chen CW, Ng YS, Chew E. Facilitating effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on EEG-based motor imagery BCI for upper limb stroke. 5th International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting, 3rd June 2013, California USA.
7. Hong X, Ong YZ, Teh I, Nasrallah FA, Lu ZK, Teo WP, Guan C, Ang KK, Phua KS, Zhao L, Chew E, Chuang KS. Brain connectivity and CBF changes following motor training by MI-BCI combined with tDCS in stroke patients. 21st International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 20th April 2012, Salt Lake City Utah.
8. Teo WP, Rodrigues JP, Mastaglia FL, Thickbroom GW. A comparison of rapid finger tapping and finger flexion-extension tasks in Parkinson’s disease. 16thInternational Congress for Parkinson’s disease and Movement Disorders, 17th June 2012, Dublin Ireland.
9. Teo WP, Rodrigues JP, Mastaglia FL, Thickbroom GW. Central changes after rhythmic movement: Effect of movement rate and cerebral dominance. 10th Motor Control and Human Skills Conference, 29th November 2011, Mandurah, Western Australia.
10. Teo WP, Rodrigues JP, Thickbroom GW. Changes to corticomotor excitability and movement frequency after paired-pulse TMS at I-wave interval: A randomised control study. 27th Symposium for Western Australian Neuroscience, 29th April 2011, Perth, Western Australia.
11. Teo WP, Joshi S, Dulyba JM, Pelc JJ, Rodrigues JP, Thickbroom GW. (2011). Kinematic and Corticomotor Changes Associated with Repeated Maximal Finger Movement Task in Healthy Individuals. Australian Neuroscience Society, 31st January 2011, Auckland New Zealand.
12. Teo WP, Rodrigues, JP, Thickbroom GW. Corticomotor excitability after non-fatiguing dynamic finger movement tasks. Australian Neuroscience Society Sensorimotor Satellite Meeting, 28th January 2011, Auckland New Zealand.

Professional activities

Journal review editor:
1. Frontiers in Neuroscience (Neural Technology/Human Neuroscience/Ageing Neuroscience)


External journal reviewer:
1. PloS One
2. Physiology and Behavior
3. Neuroscience
4. Experimental Brain Research


External grant reviewer:
1. NHMRC
2. Stroke Foundation (Australia)

Media appearances

1. “Brain boost coup: Mental stimulation aids Parkinson’s sufferers.” Published in the Herald Sun and Adelaide Advertiser on the 26th April 2016.

Awards

GRANTS

Fellowship

1. Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. “Virtual reality gaming and transcranial direct current stimulation to improve functional capacity in people with Parkinson’s disease: a double-blinded randomised controlled trial”. Teo WP. 2016 (AUD$160,000 across 2 years)

Research grants


1. The Heart Foundation Vanguard Grant. “An innovative STRoke Interactive Virtual  thErapy (STRIVE) online platform for community-dwelling stroke survivors: a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and user preferences in a community setting”. Teo WP., Johnson L., Muthalib M. & Bird ML. 2017 ($75,000)
2. Alzheimer’s Australia Project Grant. “Exploration of the associations between cognitive performance, gait and physical performance in community-dwelling older adults and people with Alzheimer’s disease”. Rantalainen T., Macpherson H. & Teo WP. 2017 ($50,000)
3. Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition Seed Fund. “Can short-term aerobic or resistance exercise improve cognitive and neurophysiological function?” Teo WP., Hendy AM. & MacPherson H. 2016 (AUD$34,286.60)
4. Deakin University Central Research Grant Scheme. “Evidence for shared neurobiology between Parkinson’s disease and autism spectrum disorders”. Teo WP., Rantalainen T., Hendy AM., MacPherson H., Duckham RL., Enticott PG. & Rinehart N. 2015 (AUD$21,000)
5. Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research Seed Fund. “Combined virtual reality gaming and non-invasive brain stimulation for upper-arm stroke rehabilitation: a pilot study”. Teo WP., MacPherson H. & Hendy A. 2015 (AUD$20,000)
6. The Myositis Association- Australia Inc. “The Effect of Functional and Resistance Training Exercise in people with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies” Johnson L., Polman R., Teo WP. & Day T. 2015 (AUD$15,000)
7. Deakin University Central Research Grant Scheme. “Concurrent strength training and transcranial stimulation to improve gait and balance in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease” Teo WP., Rantalainen T., Johnson L., Muthalib M. & Kidgell DJ. 2015 (AUD$21,000)
8. National Stroke Foundation Small Project’s Grant. “Combined bilateral transcranial direct current stimulation and functional training for stroke rehabilitation” Teo WP. & Kidgell DJ. 2013 (AUD$19,477)
9. CQUniversity Research Infrastructure Grants Scheme. "A mobile gambling platform to enhance funded research", Rockloff M., Donaldson P., Browne M., Langham E., Li E. & Teo WP. 2013 (AUD$39,817).

Projects

Dr Teo is currently a principal investigator for 3 clinical trials that includes:

1. Combined non-invasive brain stimulation and progressive resistance training to improve gait and balance in people with Parkinson’s disease;
2. Combined non-invasive brain stimulation and virtual gaming to improve balance in people with Parkinson’s disease.
3. The use of a STRoke Interactive Virtual thErapy (STRIVE) online platform for community-dwelling stroke survivors.

Publications

Filter by

2017

Optimising conservative management of chronic low back pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

K Simson, C Miller, J Ford, A Hahne, L Main, T Rantalainen, W-P Teo, M Teychenne, D Connell, G Trudel, G Zheng, G Thickbroom, D Belavy

(2017), Vol. 18, pp. 1-13, Trials, London, Eng., C1

journal

Transcranial alternating current stimulation: a potential modulator for pathological oscillations in Parkinson's disease?

W-P Teo, A Hendy, A Goodwill, A Loftus

(2017), Vol. 8, pp. 1-4, Frontiers in neurology, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal

A life-long approach to physical activity for brain health

H Macpherson, W-P Teo, L Schneider, A Smith

(2017), Vol. 9, pp. 1-12, Frontiers in aging neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal
2016

Commentary: cumulative effects of anodal and priming cathodal tDCS on pegboard test performance and motor cortical excitability

P Besson, S Perrey, W Teo, M Muthalib

(2016), Vol. 10, pp. 1-3, Frontiers in human neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal

Bihemispheric-tDCS and Upper Limb Rehabilitation Improves Retention of Motor Function in Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Study.

A Goodwill, W-P Teo, P Morgan, R Daly, D Kidgell

(2016), Vol. 10, pp. 1-14, Frontiers in human neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal

Does a Combination of Virtual Reality, Neuromodulation and Neuroimaging Provide a Comprehensive Platform for Neurorehabilitation? - A Narrative Review of the Literature.

W-P Teo, M Muthalib, S Yamin, A Hendy, K Bramstedt, E Kotsopoulos, S Perrey, H Ayaz

(2016), Vol. 10, pp. 1-15, Frontiers in human neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal

Concurrent transcranial direct current stimulation and progressive resistance training in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

A Hendy, A Tillman, T Rantalainen, M Muthalib, L Johnson, D Kidgell, D Wundersitz, P Enticott, W-P Teo

(2016), Vol. 17, pp. 1-13, Trials, London, Eng., C1

journal

Measures to predict the individual variability of corticospinal responses following transcranial direct current stimulation

N Nuzum, A Hendy, A Russell, W-P Teo

(2016), Vol. 10, pp. 1-12, Frontiers in human neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal

The time-course of acute changes in corticospinal excitability, intra-cortical inhibition and facilitation following a single-session heavy strength training of the biceps brachii

C Latella, A Hendy, A Pearce, D VanderWesthuizen, W-P Teo

(2016), Vol. 10, pp. 1-9, Frontiers in human neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal
2015

Facilitating effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on motor imagery brain-computer interface with robotic feedback for stroke rehabilitation

K Ang, C Guan, K Phua, C Wang, L Zhao, W Teo, C Chen, Y Ng, E Chew

(2015), Vol. 96, pp. S79-S87, Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Philadelphia, Pa., C1

journal

Lower limb progressive resistance training improves leg strength but not gait speed or balance in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

A Tillman, M Muthalib, A Hendy, L Johnson, T Rantalainen, D Kidgell, P Enticott, W Teo

(2015), Vol. 7, pp. 1-10, Frontiers in aging neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal

Interactive effects of GPI stimulation and levodopa on postural control in Parkinson's disease.

L Johnson, J Rodrigues, W Teo, S Walters, R Stell, G Thickbroom, F Mastaglia

(2015), Vol. 41, pp. 929-934, Gait Posture, England, C1

journal

Motor cortex excitability is not differentially modulated following skill and strength training

M Leung, T Rantalainen, W Teo, D Kidgell

(2015), Vol. 305, pp. 99-108, Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, C1

journal

Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation prolongs the cross-education of strength and corticomotor plasticity

A Hendy, W Teo, D Kidgell

(2015), Vol. 47, pp. 1788-1797, Medicine and science in sports and exercise, Philadelphia, Pa., C1-1

journal

Exergaming as a viable therapeutic tool to improve static and dynamic balance among older adults and people with idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

D Harris, T Rantalainen, M Muthalib, L Johnson, W Teo

(2015), Vol. 7, pp. 1-12, Frontiers in aging neuroscience, Lausanne, Switzerland, C1

journal
2014

Anodal tDCS Prolongs the Cross-education of Strength and Corticomotor Plasticity

A Hendy, W Teo, D Kidgell

(2014), pp. 1-37, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Philadelphia, PA, C1

journal

Poor tolerance of motor cortex rTMS in chronic migraine

W Teo, A Kannan, P Loh, E Chew, V Sharma, Y Chan

(2014), Vol. 8, pp. 1-2, Journal of clinical and diagnostic research, India, C1-1

journal

Modulation of corticomotor excitability after maximal or sustainable-rate repetitive finger movement is impaired in Parkinson's disease and is reversed by levodopa

W-P Teo, J Rodrigues, F Mastaglia, G Thickbroom

(2014), Vol. 125, pp. 562-568, Clinical neurophysiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, C1-1

journal

Is motor-imagery brain-computer interface feasible in stroke rehabilitation?

W-P Teo, E Chew

(2014), Vol. 6, pp. 723-728, PM&R, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, C1-1

journal
2013

Comparing kinematic changes between a finger-tapping task and unconstrained finger flexion-extension task in patients with Parkinson's disease.

W Teo, J Rodrigues, F Mastaglia, G Thickbroom

(2013), Vol. 227, pp. 323-331, Experimental Brain Research, Germany, C1-1

journal

Motor imagery BCI for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: an evaluation

S Tung, C Guan, K Ang, K Phua, C Wang, L Zhao, W Teo, Effie Chew

(2013), pp. 261-264, 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS, Osaka, Japan, E1-1

conference
2012

Breakdown in central motor control can be attenuated by motor practice and neuro-modulation of the primary motor cortex

W Teo, J Rodrigues, F Mastaglia, G Thickbroom

(2012), Vol. 220, pp. 11-18, Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, C1-1

journal

Changes in corticomotor excitability and inhibition after exercise are influenced by hand dominance and motor demand

W Teo, J Rodrigues, F Mastaglia, G Thickbroom

(2012), Vol. 210, pp. 110-117, Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, C1-1

journal

Post-exercise depression in corticomotor excitability after dynamic movement: a general property of fatiguing and non-fatiguing exercise

W Teo, J Rodrigues, F Mastaglia, G Thickbroom

(2012), Vol. 216, pp. 41-49, Experimental brain research, New York, N.Y., C1-1

journal
2011

The effects of circadian rhythmicity of salivary cortisol and testosterone on maximal isometric force, maximal dynamic force, and power output

W Teo, M McGuigan, M Newton

(2011), Vol. 25, pp. 1538-1545, Journal of strength and conditioning research, Philladelphia, Pa., C1-1

journal

Circadian rhythms in exercise performance: implications for hormonal and muscular adaptation

W Teo, M Newton, M McGuigan

(2011), Vol. 10, pp. 600-606, Journal of sports science and medicine, Bursa, Turkey, C1-1

journal

Grants

Australian Competitive Grants

An innovative STRoke Interactive Virtual thErapy (STRIVE) online platform for community-dwelling stroke survivors: a RCT evaluating the effectiveness and user preferences in a community setting

Dr Wei-Peng Teo, Dr Johnson Liam, Dr Mark Muthalib, Dr Marie-Louise Bird

NHF Vanguard Grant - National Heart Foundation of Australia

  • 2017: $72,296

Exploration of the associations between cognitive performance, and dual-tasking, gait, and physical performance in community-dwelling older adults and individuals with Alzheimer's

Dr Timo Rantalainen, Dr Helen Macpherson, Dr Wei-Peng Teo

Alzheimer's Australia Dementia Research Foundation Project Grants

  • 2017: $45,000

Industry and Other Funding

Combined bilateral transcranial direct current stimulation and functional training for stroke rehabilitation

Dr Wei-Peng Teo, Dr Dawson Kidgell

  • 2014: $19,477

Supervisions

Principal Supervisor
2017

Christopher Latella

Thesis entitled: Acute neurophysiological responses to resistance-training: An investigation into super-compensation theory

Doctor of Philosophy (Nutrition & Exercise) (High Cost), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Associate Supervisor
2017

Ashleigh Therese Moreland

Thesis entitled: Improving neural function in older adults through targeted exercise

Doctor of Philosophy (Nutrition & Exercise) (High Cost), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

2016

Alicia Goodwill

Thesis entitled: Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation and Functional Training: A Novel Neurorehabilitation Technique

Doctor of Philosophy (Nutrition & Exercise) (Low Cost), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

2014

Ashlee Margaret Hendy

Thesis entitled: Functional and Neurological Adaptations to Transcranial Stimulation during Strength Training

Doctor of Philosophy (Nutrition & Exercise) (High Cost), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences