Alex Bremner

ALUMNI

Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (Architecture) (Hons)
Master of Architecture

Campus

Geelong Waurn Ponds

Graduation years

1998, 2001

Deakin Alumni of the Year Award

2011

Current position

Senior Lecturer, University of Edinburgh

Overview

From Daylesford, Victoria to the hallowed halls of the University of Edinburgh – via Deakin, Cambridge and Yale – renowned architectural historian Dr Alex Bremner’s journey has been one of opportunities and accolades.

Career path and highlights

As a teenager, Alex Bremner was interested in science and the arts. He left Daylesford, Victoria, to study architectural drafting at TAFE. Alex applied for Deakin University's architecture degree after a period of work experience with his architect uncle and with Daylesford architect Helen Bernard. Alex was granted advanced standing for his previous study and admitted straight into the second year of the architecture degree program.

Alex went on to complete his master's at Deakin, pursuing his interest in the history of architecture with a study of British Colonial Architecture in Hong Kong. His lecturers encouraged him to apply to Cambridge University, and he was one of the first Australians to win a prestigious Gates Scholarship to complete a doctorate. From there, Alex went on to a postdoctoral fellowship at Yale University.

Alex admits that when he first arrived at Cambridge he was captivated. He quickly settled into the unique Cambridge lifestyle, and before long was rowing for his college and playing in the Cambridge Aussie Rules football team.

In 2011, Alex won Deakin's Alumni of the Year Award for outstanding service and achievement, in recognition of his distinguished contribution to education and research in architectural history.

Alex is now a senior lecturer in architectural history at the University of Edinburgh, an editor of the Architecture Beyond Europe journal and an editorial board member of the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. His recent book Imperial Gothic has been lauded as a ground-breaking opus magnum of the Gothic Revival Movement.