Vol 14, Numbers 1 and 2, Special Edition

Edited by
Mark Sheehan, Deakin University, Australia
Marianne Sison, RMIT University, Australia

Editorial note

About Volume 14, Numbers 1 & 2, Special Issue

This is an omnibus version of the Asia Pacific Public Relations Journal, representing issue numbers 1 and 2 for 2013.

Some of the papers are from the World Public Relations Forum Research Colloquium, and the introduction by guest co-editor Marianne Sison of RMIT University will remind readers of the intentions of that particular forum.

Dr Sison was also Chair for the Colloquium, the success of which was highly praised at the time. The organisers hope this success will be replicated in Madrid in September 2014.

We've also spent some time revising the format for readability and accessibility. The journal is now presented in A4, with a wider margin for note taking when printed, plus more suitable fonts (Avenir Black and Arial 11 point) and a shorter line length for readability online.

Submissions are now being received for Volume 15, 2014. The guest co-editor for Volume 15 is Dr Leanne Glenny of the University of South Australia.

Mark Sheehan
Editor
APPRJ
Deakin University, Australia


Contents

Introduction: Public Relations Beyond Borders: Future Directions
Marianne D. Sison

Beyond the Catwalk: Fashion Public Relations and Social Media in Australia
Leah Cassidy & Kate Fitch

Public Relations in a Global World: Culturally Centering Theory and Praxis
Mohan Jyoti Dutta

The Impact of Divergent Historical and Cultural Factors on Convergence in Global Communication Practice
Mark Sheehan & Noel Turnbull

International Public Relations and the Circuit of Culture: An Analysis of Gawad Kalinga
Zeny Sarabia-Panol & Marianne D. Sison

The Use of Weibo to Connect Chinese Communities in Australia by Australian Politicians
Ying Jiang

Towards a Framework for the Practice of Climate Change Communication in Australia
Emsie Arnoldi & Hilary Miller

The Effect of Public Relations and Corporate Reputation on Return on Investment
Jangyul Robert Kim & Heewon Cha

Book Review:
Public Relations and the Making of Modern Britain
Mark Sheehan

 

Articles

Introduction: Public Relations Beyond Borders: Future Directions

Marianne D. Sison

Full text - Introduction: Public Relations Beyond Borders

 

Beyond the Catwalk: Fashion Public Relations and Social Media in Australia

Leah Cassidy, Murdoch University
Kate Fitch, Murdoch University

There has been limited research into fashion public relations. This study explores social media use in public relations in the Australian fashion industry, using ethnographic inquiry and semi-structured interviews. The findings suggest social media is transforming fashion public relations, but its adoption is uneven, with overlaps in marketing and public relations activity. Participants use social media to engage fashion publics, keep up to date with trends, monitor competitors and promote clients. Bloggers are increasingly influential. Participants perceive they must embrace social media, or risk getting left behind. The findings contribute to understanding diverse public relations practices and the ways public relations activity is transforming in response to social media.

Full text - Beyond the Catwalk

 

Public Relations in a Global World: Culturally Centering Theory and Praxis

Mohan Jyoti Dutta, National University of Singapore

Good communication is critical to the success of organisations. It is more critical in the transnational corporate sphere as global accountability becomes a reality. Recognising community engagement as a corporate resource can lead to understanding of power models in organisations. This paper seeks to centre communication, through a variety of cultural methods, for those communities that have been dispossessed in the contemporary globalisation processes.

Full text - Public Relations in a Global World

 

The Impact of Divergent Historical and Cultural Factors on Convergence in Global Communication Practice

Mark Sheehan, Deakin University
Noel Turnbull, RMIT University

Communication practice is increasingly converging around globally consistent approaches and techniques shaped by both globalisation and globalising communications technologies. However, this paper argues, national and regional practice histories and cultural characteristics have shaped, and continue to shape, practice in individual markets. The paper analyses the extent of that these divergent histories and cultures have shaped the structure and practices of the public relations industry in Australia and other countries. The paper challenges the common assumptions about public relations development and industry practice having developed from a predominantly US-based model progressively disseminated globally. It traces the history of public relations in Australia, counter-pointing its distinctive origins, to the US-origin thesis. It also examines the impact of demography and diverse national culture on industry shape and practice, comparing the Australian industry to that of other industries around the world. It uses mini-case studies of campaigns in specific countries to assess the extent to which they are culturally bound by historical and cultural differences and the extent to which they are capable of being transferred or adapted to individual markets. For instance, assumptions about globally consistent brand identities are contradicted by McDonald’s ’branding practices in markets such as Canada and Japan. The paper also discusses how emerging market PR industries are being shaped by distinctive and divergent cultures and development paths and may create new structural and practice models as the emerging economies becoming dominant internationally. The authors suggest that history and cultural diversity continue, and will continue to, shape national and regional practices.

Full text - The Impact of Divergent Historical and Cultural Factors on Covergence in Global Communication Practice

 

International Public Relations and the Circuit of Culture: An Analysis of Gawad Kalinga

Zeny Sarabia-Panol, Middle Tennessee State University
Marianne D. Sison, RMIT University

This paper examines the intersection of meaning construction and culture through a case analysis of a non-profit organisation in the Philippines. By employing the circuit of culture as a framework, the paper illustrates how Gawad Kalinga’s discourse has incorporated a culture-centred approach to communication. While the organisation’s strategic use of the discourse of faith and care resulted in its popularity, it also presented issues of power. Moreover, its highly optimistic and positive claims resulted in gaps between its rhetoric and actual behavior. In acknowledging the importance of integrating cultural values in discourse production, we remind international public relations practitioners that meaningful community development programs require time and contextual sensitivity. This paper contributes to international public relations scholarship from the perspective of a non-profit organisation in a developing country

Full text - International Public Relations and the Circuit of Culture

 

The Use of Weibo to Connect Chinese Communities in Australia by Australian Politicians

Ying Jiang, University of Adelaide

Weibo is a Chinese microblogging website; it is one of the most popular sites in China. According to Oz Entertainment, Sina Weibo’s Australian business co-operator, there are around 500,000 Weibo users in Australia. What’s more interesting is that politicians across the three levels of government in Australia have also started joining Weibo. Scholars began debating the practical importance of using social media for politics years ago; some of them believe the uniqueness of social media will certainly bring about success for politicians. Others believe that social media hasn’t brought significant changes and, additionally, has caused danger to some extent. Grant’s research on Australian politicians’ use of Twitter has found that those who tweet to converse appear to gain more political benefit from the platform than others. However, no current research examines the usefulness of Weibo by Australian politicians. Therefore, for those Australian politicians who have decided to embark on a Chinese social media platform, are they conversing or simply broadcasting themselves? Is the existence of Australian politicians’ Weibo accounts providing a more effective political discussion platform, and encouraging more active political engagement of Chinese communities? What benefits has Weibo brought to politicians in Australia? With these questions in mind, this paper conducts the first analysis on Australian politicians’ use of Weibo. Based on the results collected from this research, this paper argues that Chinese Weibo could be beneficial for the development of effective personal public relations by Australian politicians.

Full text - The Use of Weibo to Connect Chinese Communities in Australia by Australian Politicians

 

Towards a Framework for the Practice of Climate Change Communication in Australia

Emsie Arnoldi, RMIT University
Hilary Miller, RMIT University

Climate change represents one of the most complex communication challenges for governments in advanced neoliberal democracies like Australia: to increase social capital and generate mass public support for the economic and lifestyle changes that will be required to make climate change policy effective. Drawing on an examination of secondary data on current theories used to underpin climate change communication and cross-analysis of theory and a case study from Australia, the researchers develop four pre-theoretical principles for the practice of climate change communication in Australia. Future research could build upon these pre-theoretical principles to better understand the complexities and challenges involved in climate change communication.

Full text - Towards a Framework for the Practice of Climate Change Communication in Australia

 

The Effect of Public Relations and Corporate Reputation on Return on Investment

Jangyul Robert Kim, Colorado State University
Heewon Cha, Ewha Womans University, Seoul

The tangible value of public relations to corporations remains unsolved in the domain of public relations research. It is similar in the case of quantitatively proving the value of corporate reputation ┬áIn general, it is regarded that public relations is an effective strategy to acquire a higher corporate reputation that would ultimately contribute to the organisations’ return on investment (ROI). This study attempted to identify the causal relationships among variables such as organisation size and complexity, public relations department size and formality, and corporate reputation, and how these variables affected economic ROI. The top 300 South Korean corporations were surveyed and their responses were analysed using structural equation modelling. Sizes of public relations departments and organisation s were the most important variables affecting ROI. Both public relations and corporate reputation positively affected ROI. There was a positive correlation between the complexity of an organisation, and the size and formality of a public relations department. This suggested that even a smaller corporation could enhance its reputation and thus ROI by having a well - established public relations or strategic communication department. Implication of findings and suggestions for future study were made

Full text - The Effect of Public Relations and Corporate Reputation on Return on Investment

 

Book Review: Public Relations and the Making of Modern Britain

Mark Sheehan, Deakin University

Full text - Book review: Public Relations and the Making of Modern Britain

 

APPRJ subscriptions, full transcripts of all articles and back articles are available. Contact APPRJ Editor, Mark Sheehan at sheehanm@deakin.edu.au

 


Back to top