Faculty of Arts and Education

Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation

print
 

Header

 

In our globalised world of increasing racial, ethnic and religious diversity, racism is an enduring phenomenon with a range of pernicious consequences for individuals, communities and societies. Anti-racism encompasses theory and praxis aimed at addressing racism, counteracting its detrimental effects or envisaging its alternatives

The conference will bring together scholars who study anti-racism, intercultural or race relations across a diverse range of disciplines and geographical regions. Participants will debate epistemologies, theories, policies, practices and aporias pertaining to anti-racism as a global phenomenon. Papers will address one of the following multidisciplinary themes:

1. Individual and institutional anti-racism
This theme incorporates scholarship seeking to understand and address internalised, interpersonal and institutional racism via a focus on prejudice reduction, countering stereotypes and reducing discriminatory behavior among individuals as well as race-related organisational diversity, inclusion and equality.

2. Anti-racist collective action and social change
Aimed at addressing inequitable power relations, cultural racism and/or realising racial justice, this theme includes anti-racism ranging from small-scale bystander action to state-based social marketing to worldwide popular movements.

3. Conflict resolution and intercultural understanding
This theme focuses on recognition, acknowledgement and understanding of cultural difference as key to anti-racism beyond 'harmony' in which conflict and dissent are central to viable, sustainable and legitimate race relations.

4. Alter-racist citizenship and cosmopolitanism
Shunning an 'anti-' stance, this theme considers alternatives that are converse rather than inverse to racism. Ranging from post-raciality to ethical humanism to embodied vulnerability, these approaches strive to transcend binary dualisms, dissolve ossified distinctions and transform rather than equalise power relations

 

 

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

5th December 2013