Books

Explore authored and editored books produced by members of the Centre

Authored Books

The House of Service: The Gülen Movement and Islam's Third Way

David Tittensor

David Tittensor offers a groundbreaking new perspective on the Gülen movement, a Turkish Muslim educational activist network that emerged in the 1960s and has grown into a global empire with an estimated worth of $25 billion. Named after its leader Fethullah Gülen, the movement has established more than 1,000 secular educational institutions in over 140 countries, aiming to provide holistic education that incorporates both spirituality and the secular sciences.

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Despite the movement's success, little is known about how its schools are run, or how Islam is operationalized. Drawing on thirteen months of ethnographic fieldwork in Turkey, Tittensor explores the movement's ideo-theology and how it is practiced in the schools. His interviews with both teachers and graduates from Africa, Indonesia, Central Asia, and Turkey show that the movement is a missionary organization, but of a singular kind: its goal is not simply widespread religious conversion, but a quest to recoup those Muslims who have apparently lost their way and to show non-Muslims that Muslims can embrace modernity and integrate into the wider community. Tittensor also examines the movement's operational side and shows how the schools represent an example of Mohammad Yunus's social business model: a business with a social cause at its heart. The House of Service is an insightful exploration of one of the world's largest transnational Muslim associations, and will be invaluable for those seeking to understand how Islam will be perceived and practiced in the future.

Contentious Activism and Inter-Korean Relations

Danielle Chubb

In South Korea, the contentious debate over relations with the North transcends traditional considerations of physical and economic security, and political activists play a critical role in shaping the discussion of these issues as they pursue the separate yet connected agendas of democracy, human rights, and unification. Providing international observers with a better understanding of policymakers' management of inter-Korean relations, Danielle L. Chubb traces the development of various policy disputes and perspectives from the 1970s through South Korea's democratic transition.

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Focusing on four case studies the 1980 Kwangju uprising, the June 1987 uprising, the move toward democracy in the 1990s, and the decade of "progressive" government that began with the election of Kim Dae Jung in 1997 she tracks activists' complex views on reunification along with the rise and fall of more radical voices encouraging the adoption of a North Korean style form of socialism. While these specific arguments have dissipated over the years, their vestiges can still be found in recent discussions over how to engage with North Korea and bring security and peace to the peninsula. Extending beyond the South Korean example, this examination shows how the historical trajectory of norms and beliefs can have a significant effect on a state's threat perception and security policy. It also reveals how political activists, in their role as discursive agents, play an important part in the creation of the norms and beliefs directing public debate over a state's approach to the ethical and practical demands of its foreign policy.

Focusing on four case studies the 1980 Kwangju uprising, the June 1987 uprising, the move toward democracy in the 1990s, and the decade of "progressive" government that began with the election of Kim Dae Jung in 1997 she tracks activists' complex views on reunification along with the rise and fall of more radical voices encouraging the adoption of a North Korean style form of socialism. While these specific arguments have dissipated over the years, their vestiges can still be found in recent discussions over how to engage with North Korea and bring security and peace to the peninsula. Extending beyond the South Korean example, this examination shows how the historical trajectory of norms and beliefs can have a significant effect on a state's threat perception and security policy. It also reveals how political activists, in their role as discursive agents, play an important part in the creation of the norms and beliefs directing public debate over a state's approach to the ethical and practical demands of its foreign policy.

Australian Anti-Discrimination Law

Neil Rees, Simon Rice and Dominique Allen

Australian Anti-Discrimination Law contains a detailed analysis of Australian anti-discrimination law, as well as extracts from the key cases and the writings of leading commentators. The authors comprehensively examine the difficult concepts of direct and indirect discrimination, as well as the grounds of unlawful discrimination, such as race, sex, age and disability, and the areas of activity in which discrimination is unlawful, including federal industrial relations law.

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The book records the history of the major pieces of anti-discrimination legislation, examines important international developments, and includes numerous suggestions for reforming the law. The book will be of interest to lawyers and human rights practitioners. The chapters about procedure and remedies will be particularly important to lawyers and others practicing in the field.

Edited Books

Democracy and Crisis: Democratising Governance in the Twenty-First Century

Benjamin Isakhan and Steven Slaughter

Recent years have seen near constant reports on the failures of governance and the crisis of democracy. The critical nexus between the ever-increasing array of crises that modern representative democracies face and the widening reliance on an array of undemocratic governance mechanisms and networks to meet and manage these crises needs urgent and in-depth scholarly attention.

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This book therefore seeks to investigate the ways in which representative democracy might better handle environmental, political, social and economic crises in the twenty-first century by making the mechanisms of governance more democratic. By examining cases such as the global financial crisis, the arab revolutions, Wikileaks and climate change, this volume highlights the tensions between governance and democracy during times of crisis and examines the prospects of democratising governance in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Global Perspectives on the Politics of Multiculturalism in the 21st Century: A Case Study Analysis

Fethi Mansouri and Boulou Ebanda de B'béri

Multiculturalism is now seen by many of its critics as the source of intercultural and social tensions, fostering communal segregation and social conflicts. While the cultural diversity of contemporary societies has to be acknowledged as an empirical and demographic fact, whether multiculturalism as a policy offers an optimal conduit for intercultural understanding and social harmony has become increasingly a matter of polarised public debate.

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This book examines the contested philosophical foundations of multiculturalism and its, often controversial, applications in the context of migrant societies. It also explores the current theoretical debates about the extent to which multiculturalism, and related conceptual constructs, can account for the various ethical challenges and policy dilemmas surrounding the management of cultural diversity in our contemporary societies. The authors consider common conceptual and empirical features from a transnational perspective through analysis of the case studies of Australia, Canada, Columbia, Germany, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Uruguay.

This book will be of interest to students and scholars of political science, comparative politics, international studies, multiculturalism, migration and political sociology.

Insider Research on Migration and Mobility: International Perspectives on Researcher Positioning

Lejla Voloder and Liudmila Kirpitchenko

With an increasing proportion of migration and mobility field studies being conducted by migrants and members of ethnic minorities in 'home' contexts, the implications of 'insider research' are increasingly subject critical scrutiny. Researchers who may share migration experiences or cultural, ethnic, linguistic or religious identities with their participants are exploring the means, ethics and politics of mobilizing 'insider capital' for the purpose of gaining access to and representing research participants.

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Insider Research on Migration and Mobility: International Perspectives on Researcher Positioning brings together the latest international scholarship in the sociology and anthropology of migration and explores the complexities, joys and frustrations of conducting 'insider' research. The book offers analyses of key methodological, ethical and epistemological challenges faced by migration researchers as they question the ways in which they come to identify with their research topic or their participants.

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