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Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific

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2006 news archive

CHCAP develops a Heritage Interpretation Plan for Viengxay Caves in Laos

Prof Logan presents paper on Cultural Heritage and Human Rights

League of Historical Cities 10th World Conference

UNESCO/ICOMOS Mission to Hue World Heritage Site, Vietnam

Spotlight on International Students

CHCAP welcomes visiting fellow, Professor SAITO Hidetoshi, from Tsukuba University, Japan

Kakadu Master Class - Sharing Our Heritages Update

Ilka Schacht new curator of the Sharjah Archaeology Museum, United Arab Emirates

International Exhibitions and Expos are back on the research agenda

New ARC Project on Australian Children's Playlore

Professor Logan Invited to Present Papers in Northern Ireland and Germany

Janelle Mikkelson Awarded the Roslyn Lawry Award for Excellence in Museums Studies

Jonathan Sweet on the winning team at the Museums Australia National Conference!

Linda Young attends 'The Museum: A World Forum', conference in the UK

Prof William Logan gives key note address at Cultural Heritage and Human Rights workshop in USA

Jonathan Sweet publishes on the 1950s international exhibition 'Australian Aboriginal Culture'

‘Sharing Our Heritages’: Master Classes Get Underway in France

Recalling the Indies Book Launch at Immigration Museum

Australia Day 2006 - A Byron Experience

 


CHCAP develops a Heritage Interpretation Plan for Viengxay Caves in Laos

During November and December 2006 CHCAP took part in a consultancy to develop a heritage interpretation plan for a series of cave sites around the town of Viengxay in northern Laos. In partnership with the Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies post-graduate program, CHCAP hosted 15 postgraduate students from the School of History Heritage and Society. The students had the oppurtinity to work on a practical case study while earning credit points towards the completion of their degrees. Working with the students and local counterparts from Vientiane and Viengxay CHCAP staff lead a series of excerises that aimed to build the capacity of both Lao and Deakin student participants. Among the exercises achieved were the mock up of a tourist brochure and a plan for signage (placement of signs, text on signs) and an official statement of significance.

The caves played a critical role in the 'secret war' and were used by communist revolutionary forces until American backed bombing ceased in 1973. Key members of the new regime which came to power in 1973 and formed a new unified national government in 1974 in Vientiane lived and worked in the caves which were sophisticately fitted out with modern ameneties and subdivided into work and living quarters for family, house staff, guards and troops.

CHCAP worked with local authorities, including the Kaysone Phomvihane Memorial Tour Cave Office, to develop a plan to best manage the cave sites in a sensitive way while making it attractive to international and domestic tourists. It is hoped that by attracting more tourists to the site the area will be able to generate some income that will be reinvested into the management and conservation of the caves. 

For more information about the project contact chcap@deakin.edu.au


Prof Logan presents paper on Cultural Heritage and Human Rights

Prof Bill Logan was invited to give a paper on human rights issues relating to the identification and conservation of cultural heritage at a research conference held at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, on 3 - 4 October. The conference was organised jointly by Chulalongkorn University and the UNESCO/ICCROM Asian Academy for Heritage Management, of which Deakin's Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific is a founding and core member. Bill's paper was entitled 'Limiting the List: Human Rights and Intangible Cultural Heritage'.


League of Historical Cities 10th World Conference

The Kyoto-based League of Historical Cities held its 10th World Conference at Ballarat from 29 October to 1 November 2006 on the theme of 'Sustainable Historic Cities: Economics, Preservation and Visions for the Future'. Prof Bill Logan, Cultural Heritage Centre (CHCAP) Director, and Adjunct Prof Ray Tonkin, Executive Director of Heritage Victoria, were invited to join the organising committee, act as paper referees and chair some of the conference sessions. Bill was also facilitator for the four round-table sessions in which the mayors of participating League members reported on their cities followed by open discussions on the conference theme. Dr Richard Engelhardt, one of CHCAP's nominees on the Citizenship and Globalisation RPA, was the keynote speaker, and Adjunct Professor Liz Vines gave a paper entitled 'The Australian and Asian Context of Heritage City Management'.


UNESCO/ICOMOS Mission to Hue World Heritage Site, Vietnam

Prof Bill Logan and Mr Giovanni Boccardi from UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre conduced a reactive monitoring mission to the World Heritage site at Hue, Vietnam, from 14 – 21 October 2006. The joint WHC-ICOMOS mission was carried out at the request of the World Heritage Committee to investigate the state of conservation at this site, which was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1993 and comprises the royal citadel and tombs from the Nguyen dynasty (1802-1945) and associated temples. The site faces uncoordinated urban and infrastructure development, encouraged by the central government in Hanoi, which wishes to see Hue develop rapidly as one of the top eight cities in the country.

The mission considered specifically the actions taken by the State Party (Vietnam) in relation to the removal of illegal buildings on the site; the development of an inventory of significant traditional buildings; progress on the establishment of a Conservation Management Plan; and the completion of an Environmental Impact Assessment for the proposed five-storey tourist hotel complex at Vong Canh Hill on the Perfumed River. The mission discussed these issues at a series of meetings with the Thua Thien Hue Provincial People’s Committee and Hue People’s Committee and their agencies, and will report back to UNESCO and ICOMOS in November 2006.


Spotlight on International Students

Welcome to International PhD Candidate Herman Kiriama

In August the Centre welcomed Mr Herman Kiriama who won a scholarship to study for a PhD. Mr Kiriama has a strong academic background and brings a wealth of professional experiences his studies at Deakin University. In 1984 he graduated with a BA from the University of Nairobi and later graduated from the University of Cambridge with a Master of Philosophy in 1986. He is well published and has held numerous positions in the University of Nairobi, National Museums of Kenya and Kenyatta University and spent just under a year working with Nathan Consultants of Washington DC in the development of management and marketing plans for Sites and Monuments in Zambia and Malawi. Between 1988 and 1991, he liaised with Harvard for Harvard's summer school program.

Welcome to Master of Cultural Heritage International Scholarship Recipient, Ms Natsuko (Sophia) Akagawa

Ms Natsuko (Sophia) Akagawa arrived at Deakin University in July from Macao, where she worked as a Lecturer for the Institute for Tourism Studies. Ms Akagawa has been involved in many projects relating to heritage management, urban planning, and tourism and she has studied and worked in several countries, including Japan, U.S.A., Portugal, France, Hong Kong and Macau. Her current research interest is urban conservation, heritage management, intangible cultural heritage conservation, history and tourism. Ms Akagawa's recent study on conservation was presented and published at ICOMOS 15th General Assembly and Scientific Symposium , Xian, China. She has completed a research program at University of Hawaii at Manoa with a full scholarship from the United States government.

Originaly from Osaka, Japan Ms Akagawa is fluent in English, Portuguese, Catonese and Japanese.

Welcome also to two Sharing Our Heritages exchange students from Spain

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific also welcomed two students from partner university Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain, Dolores Castañer Gómez and Alicia Cantabella Gallego.

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CHCAP welcomes visiting fellow, Professor SAITO Hidetoshi, from Tsukuba University, Japan

saito

CHCAP has welcomed visiting scholar Professor Saito Hidetoshi who is the Professor of World Heritage Studies at the Graduate School of Tsukuba University, Tsukuba City, Japan. Prof Saito will be visiting the Centre for three mornths from July to September to carry out research on international educational programs concerning cultural heritage, with a focus on the international student exchange program Sharing Our Heritages. Prof Saito plans to investigate the philosophies, principles, policies and practice on cooperational educational programs, and learn more about the challenges that teaching staffs and participating students are facing, and how they deal with those challenges.

Professor Saito's research trip to Australia is funded by the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

saito and CHCAP members

From left: Prof Saito, Prof Logan, Ms Akagawa and Dr Ellsmore

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Kakadu Master Class - Sharing Our Heritages Update

Master class examining Ubirr rock art

Master class about to enter the Warradjan Cultural Centre

As part of the international Sharing our Heritages program, Dr Joost Coté represented Deakin's Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific at a Master Class conducted at the Kakadu National Park on 16 - 25 July. Forty students from 8 participating institutions, 4 European (Brandenburg University of Technology - Germany, Catholic University of Leuven - Belgium, Polytechnic University of Valencia - Spain and University College Dublin - Ireland) and 4 Australian (University of Western Sydney, Charles Darwin University, Curtin University and Deakin University) joined the program hosted by Charles Darwin University and National Parks Australia and opened on the beach at Darwin by representatives of the Larrikia Nation. Apart from formal lectures and presentations by National Parks and traditional owners, the group visited a number of Aboriginal cultural centres as well as sites of natural and cultural significance. The highlight of the program was probably the visit to Arnhem Land to see, and have explained by traditional owners and guardians, examples of the world oldest continuous tradition of rock art. The aim of this master class, which followed a two week master class conducted in Paris and the Loire valley in January, was to observe the joint management of a world heritage designated site of natural and cultural significance. As well as admiring the natural and cultural sites Kakadu had to offer, the student group had the task of acting as consultants to park management .At the end of their program they were required to present group reports setting out their recommendations for improving the communication of park values to visitors and providing recommendations for improving the effectiveness of management strategies. Deakin’s contingent of students included four international students who had selected Deakin’s Cultural Heritage Centre program last semester, and two who, after the Master Class program, have continued on south to enrol in the CHCAP program in semester two.

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Ilka Schacht new curator of the Sharjah Archaeology Museum, United Arab Emirates

Congratulations to PhD candidate Ilka Schacht! Ilka was flown to Sharjah for a job interview as Curator of the Sharjah Archaeology Museum, and subsequently offered the position. Ilka says that the position “brings together perfectly my archaeological, collections management, and IT skills” and her passion for the culture of the Middle East.

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International Exhibitions and Expos are back on the research agenda

Three members of Cultural Heritage and Museums Studies discipline area have been invited to give papers at two forthcoming conferences on aspects of International Exhibitions and Expos. Linda Young and Jonathan Sweet, both of whom have a long-held interest in this subject, are presenting papers at 'Seize the Day: Exhibitions, Australia and the World', being held at Melbourne Museum, 19-20 October 2006. Linda will be discussing 19th century Australian International Exhibitions and Jonathan will be discussing the significance of 'International Exhibition Postcards'. And, building on their work in Laos, Jonathan Sweet and Colin Long have been invited to give a joint paper at a symposium called 'The Cold War Expo 1945 -75', which is organized by the University of Brighton and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (Jan 2007). This paper is titled, 'Cold War exhibition intrigue in Indo-China: Laos’ That Luang Fair in the 1960s'.

Postcard of the Melbourne Exhibition Building c1900. A designated UNESCO World Heritage Site

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New ARC Project on Australian Children's Playlore

The Australian Research Council has awarded a research grant for a four-year, Australia-wide study of primary school children's playground activities. The project title is Childhood, Tradition and Change: a national study of the historical and contemporary practices and significance of Australian children's playlore. Partners in this Linkage project are Melbourne, Deakin and Curtin Universities, together with the National Library of Australia and Museum Victoria. The Principal Chief Investigator is Professor Kate Darian-Smith, and other Chief Investigators are Professor Bill Logan and Professor Graham Seal.

Other major participants are Principal Researchers Dr Gwenda Davey (Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific, Deakin Burwood) and Dr June Factor (The Australian Centre, University of Melbourne). The Principal Researchers will supervise a team of fieldworkers observing and recording playground activities, including traditional games, electronic games and imaginative play. A particular focus will be on Australian schools visited over the last fifty years, including the major research of American Fulbright scholar Dr Dorothy Howard in 1954-1955. A symposium on the project will be held at Deakin in early 2008.


Dr Gwenda Davey would be pleased to hear from colleagues with an interest in this project on gwenda.davey@deakin.edu.au


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Professor Logan Invited to Present Papers in Northern Ireland and Germany

From June 14-18, 2006 Bill attended an International Symposium, ‘Heritage Education: Capacity Building in Heritage Management’, hosted by the Brandenburg University of Technology in Cottbus, Germany. Bill’s invited paper was titled 'Needs for Heritage Education in Universities’. The Symposium addressed practical concerns of heritage managers as well as the more theoretical issues of concern to scholars of heritage management. An evaluation of the Symposium can be found at www.unizar.es/muma.

From Germany, Bill flew immediately to Northern Ireland at the invitation of the Academy of Irish Cultural Heritages, University of Ulster, to present a seminar on ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage and Human Rights: Research and Teaching Agendas’. Bill was also interviewed on BBC Radio Foyle on the topic of his paper.

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Janelle Mikkelson Awarded the Roslyn Lawry Award for Excellence in Museums Studies

On 25th May 2006 the Victorian branch of Museums Australia hosted the Museum Industry Recognition Awards (MIRAs) at the National Gallery of Victoria. As in previous years, the presentation of the Roslyn Lawry Award for Excellence in Museum Studies, undertaken at Deakin University during 2005, was a highlight on the night. This year Janelle Mikkeslon was awarded the award. The award is a book prize to the value of $350.

Each year the Roslyn Lawry Award is presented to a person who has completed the Graduate Diploma of Museum Studies and has:

• achieved standards of excellence in their academic record;
• demonstrated a personal commitment to museum training;
• demonstrated suitable personal qualities in the pursuit of excellence in museum work; and
• displayed personal initiative within the museum profession.

Janelle has acheived all of these qualities while studing off campus and working full time. The Centre and the Faculty of Arts warmly congratulates Janelle on her prize.

From left: Mr Jonathan Sweet, Dr Linda Young, Prof. Joan Beaumont (Dean), Ms Janelle Mikkelsen and Prof. Bill Logan.

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Jonathan Sweet on the winning team at the Museums Australia National Conference!

Jonathan Sweet debating for the affirmative that Shopping Centres are more Engaging than Museums.

photo courtesy of Bruce Cowell, Museums Australia

The 'Great Debate' was a feature of the 2006 Museums Australia National Conference held in Brisbane. It was a humorous hypothetical, chaired by the masterful Peter Spearritt. Teams debated the statement: 'Shopping centres are more engaging than museums'.

CHCAP museologist Jonathan Sweet was on the affirmative team, along with Frank Howarth, Director of the Australian Museum, and Liliana Montague, the CEO of Surfers Paradise Management.

The team demonstrated personality and some very serious assets, including matching T-shirts that boldly proclaimed 'I shop therefore I am'. They applied unsophisticated wit and ruthless debating skills to effectively muster the loudest audience applause and win the popular vote.

However, the crusty official adjudicators, reasserting the intellectual elitism of museum professionals, were not convinced, and noting the paucity of serious content, they awarded their judgement to the opposition. This respectable highbrow team consisted of Laura Mumaw, CEO of Zoos Victoria, Graham Durant, Director of Questacon and Peter Browning of the Hornery Institute.

Congratulations to them, but there was discontent in the post-debate corridor chatter with some delegates calling for the heads of the adjudicators. Which confirms yet again that curators love to shop.

photo courtesy of Bruce Cowell, Museums Australia

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Linda Young attends 'The Museum: A World Forum', conference in the UK

Linda Young attended 'The Museum: A World Forum', a conference held at Leicester University to mark the 40th anniversary of the biggest and most productive Museum Studies program in Europe. Focusing on the twenty-first century museum, the three days focused on shaping the concept of the museum; museum purposes and paradigms;and museums and their communities. The lights of international museum scholarship participated in a festive atmosphere, with animated conversations throughout.

Linda gave a paper in the second theme: 'Buildings as museums in the age of heritage', examining historic houses as a genre of museum, drawing on case studies in the UK, the US and Australia, and contrasting the 'museumised' house with the current practice of listing and imposing planning controls on heritage buildings. She also visited museums and sites in Liverpool and Birmingham. Highlights were the two Beatle childhood homes in Liverpool: the Lennon 1920s semi-detached bungalow in the leafy suburbs and the McCartney 1950s unit in a post-WW2 development of row housing, both now operated by the National Trust. The power of the house museum idea!

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Prof William Logan gives key note address at Cultural Heritage and Human Rights workshop in USA

On March 10 Professor William Logan delivered the Keynote Address at an international workshop hosted by the University of Illinois on 'Cultural Heritage and Human Rights'. Prof Logan's paper, titled Closing Pandora's Box: Human Rights Conundrums in Cultural Heritage Protection, opened the workshop which aimed to address a deeply political aspect of heritage preservation and management. The workshop brought together experts from range of educational insitutions and heritage organisations from around the world.

More infromation about the workshop can be found at http://www.champ.uiuc.edu/CHHRWorkshopProgram.html.

US Conference

From Left - Dr Laurajane Smith (University of York), Professor Helaine Silverman (University of Illinois), Associate Professor Dede Fairchild Ruggles (University of Illinois), Professor William Logan (Deakin University)

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Jonathan Sweet publishes on the 1950s international exhibition 'Australian Aboriginal Culture'

A new article by Jonathan Sweet investigates aspects of the production, dissemination and consumption of UNESCO’s first international touring exhibition, Australian Aboriginal Culture, in order to explore the relationship between UNESCO and Australia in the development of a key cultural heritage program. It argues that the exhibition indicates a national and international spirit of universalism that attempted to address cross-cultural ignorance in a period of post-war optimism.

Jonathan Sweet, 'UNESCO and cultural heritage practice in Australia in the 1950s: The international touring exhibition Australian Aboriginal Culture, 1948-55', Asia Pacific Journal of Arts and Cultural Management, Volume 4, Issue 1, February 2006.

 

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‘Sharing Our Heritages’: Master Classes Get Underway in France

The first set of master classes took place at UNESCO headquarters in Paris from 16 – 26 January, with a four-day study tour to the Val de Loire World Heritage site. This marked the first step in the collaborative arrangement funded by the European Commission and Australian Government (DEST) in which four European and four Australian universities, including Deakin share students, staff expertise and understandings about heritage and its management.

In each of 2006 and 2007 twenty European and twenty Australian students studying heritage management at the Masters level will undertake a semester’s exchange and take a January set of master classes in Paris and a July set at the Kakadu World Heritage site in the Northern Territory.

Key presenters in Paris were Bernd von Drost, the first director of the World Heritage Centre, and current specialists in the Centre such as Mechtild Dröste and Christian Manhart. Prof Bill Logan and Dr Linda Young, School of History, Heritage and Society, participated in the Paris master classes as organisers and presenters. The master classes ended on 26 January with a reception co-hosted by the Australian Permanent Delegate to UNESCO.

Three Deakin students took the master classes – Margaret Heathcote, Leanne Howard and Dominique Moussou – and are now moving onto the exchange components at, respectively, Leuven University (Belgium), University College Dublin (Ireland) and Polytechnic University of Valencia (Spain). Another group of Deakin students will commence the program in July, starting with the Kakadu master classes.

Chris Landorf also took part in the Paris master classes. A PhD student under Bill’s supervision, Chris is working on a thesis focused on the management of World Heritage industrial sites.

In first semester 8 European students will be joining Deakin’s Master of Cultural Heritage – 3 from Valencia, 2 from Leuven, 2 from the Brandenburg Technical University at Cottbus, and one from Dublin. We are looking forward very much to their arrival during February and to their participation in the on-campus classes.

The SOH project represents another example of internationalisation at Deakin.

Bill Logan
Linda Young

Fontervraud
Discussion
Villandry

 

Chambord Paris Passage Brady

Visit the Sharing Our Heritages website for more information about the program and to download application forms.

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Recalling the Indies Book Launch at Immigration Museum

Joost Coté spoke to a audience of mainly Dutch and Indisch Dutch people at the Migration Museum on Sunday 12 February at the launch of Recalling the Indies: Colonial memories and Postcolonial identities (Aksant, Amsterdam), jointly edited by Joost and Loes Westerbeek, a PhD student with the Cultural Heritage Centre. The book, together with another book on Dutch migration, The Dutch Down Under: 1606 – 2006, was officially launched by representatives from the Royal Netherlands Consulate and Embassy. The occasion was financially supported by the Victorian Department of Multicultural Affairs. The Royal Netherlands Embassy, the Migration Museum and The Erasmus (Dutch) Society.

Recalling Indies Launch

 

 

The occasion was somewhat of a gala event being the second event in a year long seies of festivities to commemorate 400 years contact between the Netherlands and Australia. In his speech, Joost stressed how the early years of contact between the Netherlands and Australia was not initiated from the Netherlands as such, but indeed from the nearby Dutch settlement of Batavia, which also helped support the fledgling British colony in New South Wales. The day therefore was suitably entitled “ Dutch migration to Australia: the case of the Indisch Dutch’, the Dutch from the Netherlands East Indies (Indonesia) being the focus for the afternoon.

The book covers the three key stages in the lives of the Indisch Dutch migrants and contains a mix of interview transcripts and chapters by Australian and Dutch academics. In reviewing the book, Joost stressed the participation of the Indisch Dutch community in the project through their willingness to tell their stories He hoped that, in providing the first English language account of the experience of Indonesian born, Dutch migrants in Australia, it would both inform their non-Dutch reading descendents as well as the wider Australian community about this little known connection Australia has with its large near neighbour. An Indonesian version of the book was published last year.

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Australia Day 2006 - A Byron Experience

Lecturer Dr Donald Ellsmore spoke at January 26 celebrations in Byron Bay. Below is a pdf document of Donald's Australia Day address and a poem that he was inspired to write after the event.

Dr Donald Ellsmore

Dr Donald Ellsmore delivers Australia Day Address at the Brunswick Valley Historical Society, Mullumbimby on 26th January 2006

Dr Donald Ellsmore Australia Day Address (pdf 123kb)

Australia Day 2006 - A Bryon Experience poem (pdf 19kb)

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Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

21st June 2011