Research

Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific

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Current projects


New ARC Discovery Grants commencing in 2010

Army History Unit

Landscape and Memory: The West Coast of Victoria


Remembering Places of Pain and Shame: Conservation of the Asia-Pacific Region's 'Difficult' Heritage of Imprisonment Sites

The Influence of Indian Antecedents on the Geometry of Southeast Asian Temples

Childhood, Tradition and Change: A National Study of the Historical and Contemporary Practices and Significance of Australian Children's Playlore

The Culture of War: Private Life and Sentiment in Australia 1914-1918

Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Human Rights


New ARC Discovery Grants commencing in 2010

Australian Heritage Abroad: Managing Australia's Extraterritorial War Heritage
Prof WS Logan; Prof JE Beaumont; A/Prof A Witcomb; Dr B Ziino

This project will focus on the implications of interpreting and managing sites of significance in Australia's experience of war beyond Australian territory. Addressing the problems of extraterritorial heritage in this study will open a new and rich field of inquiry in heritage studies, and help to place Australia at the forefront of debates about international heritage management. In seeking to understand the multiple stories that surround those sites, from Australian, local, and international perspectives, this project exposes the potential for enriched understanding, interpretation and preservation of these crucial sites in Australia's cultural heritage and in the heritage of our neighbours.

 

Vietnam: heritage of a nation
Prof WS Logan; Dr CD Long

This project will contribute to the understanding of Vietnam's cultural history and to protection of Vietnamese cultural heritage. The findings will be relevant to the work of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) and national industry bodies and to professional organizations such the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). The project may lead to the addition of new items to UNESCO and Vietnamese heritage registers (both tangible and intangible) for the benefit of the global community at large. The project will enhance Australia's reputation in the region as a producer of innovative approaches to heritage conservation and will strengthen the 'Asia literacy' of Australian heritage professionals. The project fits the ARC's research priority goal 'Understanding Our Region'.

 

Dr Linda Young is part of a team based at La Trobe Archaeology that will administer the project:

Suburban archaeology: approaching an archaeology of the middle class in 19th century Melbourne
Prof TA Murray; Asst Prof SE Lawrence; A/Prof AJ May; Dr SC Hayes; Dr Linda E Young

This project has three main benefits. First, it will help Australians understand more about the richness and diversity of urban experience in the country, thereby enhancing the heritage value of Museum collections drawn from urban archaeological sites. Second, by focusing on the historical archaeology of the emergent middle class in Australia we will improve our understanding of the history of Australian society during a crucial period. Last, it will enrich the social and cultural histories of Australia through a deeper and closer integration of archaeological and written historical information.

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Army History

Consultants: Dr Linda Young
Ongoing agreement:
An agreement was been signed between CHCAP and the Department of Defence Army History Unit in 2002 to establish an annual intensive museum studies course for military museum personnel. The week-long program consists of lectures in collections management, exhibition planning, visitor evaluation and museum marketing, interspersed with project work on a case study and site visits to military and non-military museums and monuments. The course is led each summer by Dr Linda Young, with assistance from other CHCAP staff, adjunct and honorary members.

More information: linda.young@deakin.edu.au

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Landscape and Memory: The West Coast of Victoria

A research project funded by an ARC Linkage Grant, 2004-2007.

Research Team:

A/Prof. S Srivastava
A/Prof. L. Johnson
Prof. M. Meehan
Dr F. Devlin-Glass
D. de Bruyn

The application is for an APAI PhD, located within a wider plan by Deakin University and Experimenta Media Arts to develop an interactive mode of analysis of landscape and design of civic spaces across the west coast and hinterland regions in Victoria. The project will locate development and regional cultural understanding within an enriched historical perspective, drawing on cross-disciplinary research and using digital animation in particular to display the 'presence of the past in the present', to explore and promote distinctive and sustainable modes of living, and to construct visual hypotheses for environmental and cultural development in each area.

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Remembering Places of Pain and Shame: Conservation of the Asia-Pacific Region's 'Difficult' Heritage of Imprisonment Sites

Prof WS Logan; Dr CD Long; Dr F Qian; Mr KJ Reeves

APD Dr F Qian

This ARC funded Disovery project will contribute to theoretical and practical discourses relevant to Australia's cultural heritage industry. Its findings will have implications for the work of national and state industry bodies (Australian Heritage Council, Australian Dept of Environment and Heritage, Heritage Victoria) and professional organisations (Australia ICOMOS). The project findings may lead to concrete results such as the addition of new places to international, national and state heritage registers and their protection for the benefit of the community at large. The project will also provide Early Career Researcher training and enhance possibilities for future research collaboration with heritage and tourism industry partners.

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The Influence of Indian Antecedents on the Geometry of Southeast Asian Temples

An ARC Discovery project, 2006-2008

Chief Investigators: Dr Sambit Datta and Dr David Beynon

From its early beginnings in the fifth century, the Nâgara tradition created a rich body of temples which spread across Northern India and influenced temple building traditions across Southeast Asia. While the architectural forms of Southeast Asian temples have obvious Indian antecedents, tracing the links between the two traditions' antecedents remains difficult. The lack of textual accounts and fragmented or heavily eroded architectural remains from the earliest Southeast Asian civilisations, compound the difficulties associated with tracing the influence of Indian antecedents.

The project seeks to address these difficulties by drawing upon computational modelling of diagrams, canonical descriptions and photogrammetry of temples in India and Southeast Asia. The aim of the project is to establish the degree to which Southeast Asian (Khmer, Javanese and Cham) temples are attributable to Nâgara lineage and influence.

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Childhood Tradition and Change: A National Study of the Historical and Contemporary Practices and Significance of Australian Children's Playlore

Prof K. Darian-Smith (University of Melbourne), Prof W. Logan (Deakin University), Prof G. Seal (Curtin University)

The Australian Research Council has awarded a research grant for a four-year, Australia-wide study of primary school children's playground activities. The project title is Childhood, Tradition and Change: a national study of the historical and contemporary practices and significance of Australian children's playlore. Partners in this Linkage project are Melbourne, Deakin and Curtin Universities, together with the National Library of Australia and Museum Victoria. The Principal Chief Investigator is Professor Kate Darian-Smith, and other Chief Investigators are Professor Bill Logan and Professor Graham Seal.

Other major participants are Principal Researchers Dr Gwenda Davey (Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific, Deakin Burwood) and Dr June Factor (The Australian Centre, University of Melbourne). The Principal Researchers will supervise a team of fieldworkers observing and recording playground activities, including traditional games, electronic games and imaginative play. A particular focus will be on Australian schools visited over the last fifty years, including the major research of American Fulbright scholar Dr Dorothy Howard in 1954-1955. A symposium on the project will be held at Deakin in early 2008.

For further information about this project please visit the project website. If you can provide information or stories that will enrich the project and assist the research effort, please contact the project officer, Dr Nikki Henningham .

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The Culture of War: Private Life and Sentiment in Australia 1914-1918

Dr Bart Ziino
ARC Discovery, 2008-2011

This study has the potential to place Australia at the forefront of a new theoretical approach to civilian agency in total war, and enhance the national reputation for important scholarship in a field dominated by international scholars. Also, while war has been central to Australian notions of identity, our sense of 'war' is intimately connected to the front-line, and not to the home front. This study will help reorient academic and pouplar attention back to the importance of the home front in Australia's experience of 1914-1918. At a time when Australians are increasingly interested in family links with the war, this project will provide a greater appreciation of the war's effects on Australia nationally and on the most personal levels.

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Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Human Rights

Staff of the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific are currently collaborating with Deakin and international research partners on a project entitled Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Human Rights: Exploring Theory and Practice in the Asia-Pacific Region.

This broad-reaching project falls within the Centre’s critical heritage research focus and aims to make a major contribution to key debates on heritage practice and theory internationally.

The project is being conducted under the Memorandum of Understanding with the UNESCO World Heritage Centre. Academics in other universities wishing to collaborate in the project are welcome to contact the project director, Prof William Logan, at Deakin University (wl@deakin.edu.au or chcap@deakin.edu.au).

The importance of cultural heritage to cultural expression and identity formation is being increasingly recognised world-wide. Both the conservation and the erasure of cultural heritage are highly political processes serving to assert communal rights and reflecting and reinforcing power dynamics and differentials within communities.

Where human rights and cultural heritage theories and practice converge numerous questions of ethical and political significance are raised.

Research encompassing case studies on Australia, Fiji, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam and Indonesia will draw out the pressing issues concerning cultural heritage and human rights in the region.

Project Outcomes

To date the outcomes include the following publications and conference and workshop presentations:

Publications:

W. Logan (2007). ‘Closing Pandora’s Box: Human Rights Conundrums in Cultural Heritage Protection’. In H. Silverman and D. Ruggles Fairchild (eds), Cultural Heritage and Human Rights. Springer, New York, pp. 33-52.

W. Logan (2008). ‘Cultural Heritage and Human Rights’. In B. J. Graham and P. Howard (eds), Ashgate Research Companion to Heritage and Identity, Ashgate Publishing Ltd, Aldershot, UK; pp. 660-80.

W. Logan (2007). ‘Reshaping the “Sunburned Country”: Heritage and cultural politics in contemporary Australia’. In R. Jones and B. J. Shaw (eds), Loving a Sunburned Country? Geographies of Australian Heritages, Ashgate Publishing Ltd, Aldershot, UK, 2007; 207-23.

W. Logan (2006). ‘Limiting the List: Human Rights and Intangible Cultural Heritage’. In S. Silaphacharanan & J. W. Campbell (eds), Asian Approaches to Conservation: Research Conference Proceedings 3-5 October 2006, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok; pp. 80-6.


Presentations:

S. Balderstone (2007), “Managing heritage in the wake of war and conflict in Cyprus”, Paper, Australia ICOMOS National Conference 2007, eXtreme Heritage, James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, 19-21 July 2007.

M. Langfield (2007). “Indigenous peoples are not multicultural minorities”: John Howard, cultural diversity and indigenous human rights in Australia. Paper, ‘Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Human Rights International Workshop’, Academy for Irish Cultural Heritages, University of Ulster, Derry, 30 November –1 December.

W. Logan (2007). Protecting the Tay Nguyen Gongs: Conflicting Human Rights Claims in Vietnam’s Central Plateau. Paper, ‘Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Human Rights
International Workshop’, Academy for Irish Cultural Heritages, University of Ulster, Derry, 30 November –1 December.

W. Logan (2006). Intangible Cultural Heritage and Human Rights: Research and Teaching Agendas. Invited Seminar, Academy of Irish Cultural Heritages, University of Ulster, Magee Campus, Derry, Northern Ireland, UK, 19 June.

W. Logan (2006). Human Rights and Cultural Heritage. Public Lecture, Deakin Week, Museum of Victoria, Melbourne, 24 May.

W. Logan (2006). Closing Pandora’s Box: Human Rights Conundrums in Cultural Heritage Protection. Keynote Lecture, ‘Cultural Heritage and Human Rights’ workshop, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 10 March.

W. Logan (2007), “Protecting cultural heritage as a human right”, Paper, Australia ICOMOS National Conference 2007, eXtreme Heritage, James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, 19-21 July 2007.

C. Long (2007), “’Dig a hole and bury the past in it’: Reconciliation and the heritage of genocide in Cambodia”, Paper, Australia ICOMOS National Conference 2007, eXtreme Heritage, James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, 19-21 July 2007.

J. Philp (2007), “The problematic nature of Burmese cultural traditions for the expression of cultural diversity and the assertion of cultural rights”, Paper, Australia ICOMOS National Conference 2007, eXtreme Heritage, James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, 19-21 July 2007.

Planned Outcomes:

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific will have a series of five books published between 2008 and 2010 under the theme Key Issues in Cultural Heritage. Individual titles will include:

  • Remembering Places of Pain and Shame (editors Prof. Bill Logan and Keir Reeves, University of Melbourne);
  • Cultural Heritage and Globalisation (Sophia Labadi, Getty Conservation Institute, and Dr Colin Long);
  • Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Human Rights (Prof. Mairead nic Craith, Academy of Irish Cultural Heritages, U. Ulster, Dr Michele Langfield and Prof. Bill Logan);
  • Cultural Heritage and War (Prof. Joan Beaumont and Keith Jeffrey, Queens University).

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

11th January 2010