Staff profile

Dr Dawson Kidgell

Position: Senior Research Fellow
role description
Faculty or Division: Faculty of Health
Department: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Campus: Melbourne Burwood Campus
Phone: +61 3 92517264 +61 3 92517264
Email: dawson.kidgell@deakin.edu.au

Academic

Teaching Interests

Supervisor of 4 PhD students


Conferences and seminars

1. Kidgell, DJ, Pearce AJ. Corticospinal excitability following motor imagery of a strength training task. 8th Annual World Congress on Brain, Spinal Cord Mapping & Image Guided Therapy, San Francisco, California, (2011). 2. Pearce, AJ, Latella, C, Kidgell, DJ. Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training. 8th Annual World Congress on Brain, Spinal Cord Mapping & Image Guided Therapy, San Francisco, California, (2011). 3. Pearce, AJ, Hendy, A, Bowen, W, Kidgell, DJ. Corticospinal adaptations with cross education underpin retention of strength and neural excitability in an unweighted upper limb. 8th Annual World Congress on Brain, Spinal Cord Mapping & Image Guided Therapy, San Francisco, California, (2011). 4. Jaberzadeh, S, Bastani, A, Kidgell, DJ. Anodal-transcranial direct current stimulation: the effects of longer applications on the size of corticomotor excitability. 10th Motor Control and Human Skill Conference, Perth, Australia, (2011). 5. Weier, A, Pearce, A, Kidgell, DJ. Superimposed vibration confers no additional benefit compared to strength alone on cortimotor excitability. 10th Motor Control and Human Skill Conference, Perth, Australia, (2011). 6. Goodwill, A, Pearce, A, Kidgell, DJ. Corticomotor responses in the trained and untrained limb following strength training with and without vibration. 10th Motor Control and Human Skill Conference, Perth, Australia, (2011). 7. Hendy, A and Kidgell, DJ. Neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning strength maintenance following a period of limb immobilisation. 10th Motor Control and Human Skill Conference, Perth, Australia, (2011). 8. Leung, M, Spittle, M, Pearce, A, Kidgell, DJ. Corticospinal excitability following motor imagery of a strength training task: Effects on the cross-transfer of strength. 10th Motor Control and Human Skill Conference, Perth, Australia, (2011).

Awards

Awards and prizes

2011, Faculty of Human Development, Victoria University, most outstanding researcher within the faculty awarded to DJ Kidgell.



Awarded one of three prizes in the The Dennis Glencross Memorial Young Scholar Award in 2009 at the 9th Motor Control and Human Skills Conference in Tasmania.


Research

Research interests

With a PhD in Neurophysiology, Dr Kidgells research interests include using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess cortical plasticity following motor skill training in health and disease. Dr Kidgell is also interested in the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation during motor skill training and how this technique maybe in used in the rehabilitation of stroke patients.


Research page

http://www.deakin.edu.au/research/admin/pubs/reports/database/dynamic/output/person/person.php?person_code=kidgeda


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