PhD scholarship – The malaria protein export machinery

A PhD scholarship is available in Deakin University's Centre for Molecular and Medical Research, School of Medicine. The PhD student, under the guidance of the Chief Investigator, will initiate and conduct research on the topic of ‘Functional dissection of the malaria protein export machinery’ led by Professor Tania De Koning-Ward.

Project brief

This research will be conducted in conjunction with the laboratory of Dr Paul Gilson at the Burnet Institute in Melbourne. The successful applicant will mainly be based at the Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus and must be willing to carry out research at the Burnet Institute in Melbourne.

Project aim

Plasmodium parasites that cause the disease malaria reside inside erythrocytes, a very basic cell that lacks a vesicular trafficking pathway. To survive and thrive in erythrocytes, Plasmodium parasites must transport many of their own proteins into the host cell. In a breakthrough discovery, we revealed that Plasmodium have evolved a completely unique molecular translocon machinery to achieve this. 

This research aims to functionally dissect how this novel and essential machinery operates to transport malaria proteins into erythrocytes using a raft of genetic engineering, cell biology and biochemical techniques.

Value and duration

Value

  • A stipend of $26,682 (2017 rate) per annum, tax exempt.

Duration

  • Three years

Important dates

closing date

31 January 2017

Eligibility criteria

  • Applications open to domestic candidates only (Australian Citizenship, Australian Permanent Resident, New Zealand Citizenship).
  • Applicants must meet Deakin's PhD entry requirements, be enrolling full time and hold an Honours degree (First Class) or a Master's degree with a substantial research component in a related field. Please refer to the entry pathways to higher degrees by research for further information.
  • It's essential that the applicant has molecular biology expertise and has undertaken their Honours/research Master’s degree in the area of microbiology or biochemistry or a related discipline.
  • Expertise with cell biology and/or biochemistry is highly desirable.
  • The research will be conducted in conjunction with the laboratory of Dr Paul Gilson at the Burnet Institute in Melbourne. The successful applicant will also be willing to carry out research at the Burnet Institute.

How to apply

Please refer to the How to apply for a research degree page for application information.

Further information

If you wish to discuss your research interests and project proposal before applying, please contact:

Professor Tania De Koning-Ward
+61 3 5227 2923
Email Professor De Koning-Ward