Bachelor of Property and Real Estate/Bachelor of Commerce

Course summary for current students

Year2017 course information
Award granted

Bachelor of Property and Real Estate/ Bachelor of Commerce

CampusOffered at Burwood (Melbourne)
Cloud CampusYes
Duration

4 years full-time or part-time equivalent

CRICOS course code072834F
Deakin course codeD325

This course structure applies to students who commenced in 2016.

Students who commenced prior to 2016 should refer to the Handbook Archive for their course structure and consult with their enrolment officer.

Course sub-headings

Course overview

The Bachelor of Property and Real Estate/Bachelor of Commerce (BPRE/BCom), combines the popular Bachelor of Property and Real Estate and the highly respected Bachelor of Commerce together into a four year program of study. This degree will provide you with the unique opportunity to undertake complementary major sequences in commerce and property and real estate whilst building on the strong synergy between the two high profile disciplines which is sought after in industry.
 
The Bachelor of Commerce has a strong public profile and an established reputation with industry and professional bodies.  Property and real estate is an established discipline in Australia and the course is designed to produce highly skilled property professionals who are able to enter the workforce with a qualification fully recognised by employers, government and professional organisations. Graduates from this degree can enter a wide range of local and international employment positions and are keenly sought after in industry and government.

Indicative student workload

As a student in the Faculty of Business and Law, you can expect to participate in a range of teaching activities each week. This could include classes, seminars, practicals and online interaction. You can refer to the individual unit details in the course structure for more information. You will also need to study and complete assessment tasks in your own time.

Professional recognition

The Bachelor of Property and Real Estate has professional accreditation by the Australian Property Institute (API) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).  Graduates will meet the academic requirement to be eligible for registration as a Certified Practising Valuer (CPV).
 
The Bachelor of Commerce can lead to accreditation with many professional bodies, such as the CA Program of the Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia (ICAA), Associate membership for the CPA Program, CPA Australia, IPA Program of theInstitute of Public Accountants (IPA) and exemptions may apply for the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Economics Society of Australia and the Australian Marketing Institute, provided that specific requirements within the course have been met.
 
Units in addition to the 16 credit points required for completion of the Bachelor of Commerce component of this combined course may be necessary to attain some of these professional accreditations.


Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes (DGLOs)

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

Minimum Standards

1.  Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities: appropriate to the level of study related to a discipline or profession.

  • Apply a broad and coherent knowledge of the scientific disciplines of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and the environment within the chosen major area(s) of study to demonstrate a deep understanding of scientific facts, scientific practices and the edifice of science.
  • Apply technical knowledge and skills and use them in a range of activities, in a professional and/or academic setting within the major area(s) of study; this application of technical knowledge and skills being characterised by:

- Demonstrable in-depth knowledge of scientific methods and tools, and
- Demonstrable proficiency in the utilisation of chosen major area(s) knowledge.;

  • Use hypotheses, laws, facts and theories to investigate, test, analyse, and evaluate scientific data and demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility to argue about characteristics and aspects of scientific theory in the advancement of science.
  • Demonstrate broad knowledge of science concepts, methods, and the nature of science including, what science is and how science works, and the role of Science in society through an in-depth knowledge within (a) chosen major area(s) of study.
  • Consistently and autonomously select and apply technical knowledge and skills to determine acceptable scientific methods of inquiry for observation, experimentation and inference of scientific data.
  • Integrate and apply knowledge safely, within diverse science contexts, to collect and analyse scientific data, to evaluate and investigate of scientific problems, and to interpret and present logical arguments and results taking into account multiple perspectives including ethical, social and political factors underlying scientific breakthroughs.

 

 

2.  Communication: using oral, written and interpersonal communication to inform, motivate and effect change.

  • Demonstrate listening skills and the ability to use a range of communication skills to accommodate, encourage and answer audience questions.
  • Articulate the boundaries or limits of scientific information, experimental or field data, discuss error, probability, uncertainty, conclusions and arguments.
  • Judge how well to present essential details of scientific procedures, key observations, results and conclusions in a professional manner using appropriate style, language and references including local, national, and international contributions or contexts.
  • Use written, oral, visual and interpersonal communication skills and styles to elaborate and explain on the meaning and implication of scientific results, information, or arguments to specialist and non-specialist audience.
  • Use different genres of communication including formal and informal modes to engage and inform peers, experts and lay person about the nature of science, its implications and impacts and the controversies surrounding scientific inquiry.
  • Use a range of tools and techniques to document details of procedures, key observations, results and conclusions and present a clear and coherent argument to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

 

3.  Digital literacy: using technologies to find, use and disseminate information.

  • Use well-developed technical skills, judgement and responsibility to independently locate, analyse, evaluate the merits of, synthesise and disseminate scientific literature, information, data and results.
  • Use web-based resources, digital tools and technology to find, use, evaluate, analyse, synthesise and disseminate scientific information, scientific data and results.

 

 

4.  Critical thinking: evaluating information using critical and analytical thinking and judgment.

  • Locate and evaluate scientific information from multiple sources and use scientific methods and frameworks to structure and plan observations, experimentation or fieldwork investigations.
  • Use critical and analytical thinking and judgement to analyse, synthesise and generate an integrated knowledge, formulate hypotheses and test them against evidence-based scientific concepts and principles.
  • Collect, record and evaluate scientific information or data from a variety of sources including self-selected sources and criteria related to the aims of the inquiry using appropriate methodologies.
  • Systematically and methodically discriminate between assertion or personal opinion and information substantiated by robust evidence.
  • Reveal insightful patterns, differences or similarities by interpreting and evaluating complex view points by asking rigorous questions to formulate hypotheses and test them against scientific facts, laws, principles and evidence.

 

5.  Problem solving: creating solutions to authentic (real world and ill-defined) problems.

  • Use initiative and creativity in planning, identifying and using multiple approaches to recognise, clarify, construct and solve problems taking into account relevant contextual factors.
  • Advocate scientific methodologies, hypotheses, laws, facts and principles to create solutions to authentic real world problems.

 

  • Propose one or more creative solutions that indicates a deep comprehension of the problem, ability to prioritise tasks, reflect on possibilities, judge the pros and cons of various solutions within a given context and formulate a logical solution.
  • Provide detailed and insightful scientific explanation and guidance to implement solutions in a manner that addresses multiple contextual factors and facets of the problem.

 

6. Self-management:          working and learning independently, and taking responsibility for personal actions.

  • Take personal, professional and social responsibility within changing professional science contexts to develop autonomy as learners and evaluate own performance.
  • Work autonomously, responsibly and safely to solve unstructured problems and actively apply knowledge of regulatory frameworks and scientific methodologies to make informed choices.
  • Consistently consider the scientific context, background information, ethical consideration and intellectual property issues to demonstrate a framework of accountability, honesty and responsibility for own scientific learning.
  • Practice safety policies, compliance procedures and follow regulations when investigating, experimenting or conducting fieldwork and present data and evidence collected with accuracy and rigour, while acknowledging the contributions made by others.

 

7. Teamwork: working and learning with others from different disciplines and backgrounds.

  • Work independently and collaboratively as a team to contribute towards achieving team goals and thereby demonstrate interpersonal skills including the ability to brainstorm, negotiate, resolve conflicts, managing difficult and awkward conversations, provide constructive feedback and work in diverse professional, social and cultural contexts.
  • Consistently complete all assigned tasks by deadline, proactively assist others, lead, contribute to ideas and teamwork by engaging in research, constructive discussions, debates, arguments and dissemination of information in a manner that resolves conflicts and germinates ideas for further exploration.

 

8.  Global citizenship: engaging ethically and productively in the professional context and with diverse communities and cultures in a global context

  • Apply scientific knowledge and skills with a high level of autonomy, judgement, responsibility and accountability in collaboration with others to articulate the place and importance of science in the local and global community.
  • Demonstrate ethical, professional, social and cultural awareness and apply a framework of accountability, honesty and responsibility that indicates professionalism, objectivity and an unbiased position when working with others, including members of the society.

 

 Approved by Faculty Board: 28 July 2016

Fees and charges

Fees and charges vary depending on your course, your fee category and the year you started. To find out about the fees and charges that apply to you, visit the Current students fees website.

Course rules

To complete the Bachelor of Property and Real Estate/Bachelor of Commerce students must attain a total of 32 credit points consisting of 16 credit points from the Bachelor of Property and Real Estate and 16 credit points from the Bachelor of Commerce.  Most units (think of units as 'subjects') are equal to 1 credit point. Course requirements for both the Bachelor of Property and Real Estate (M348) and the Bachelor of Commerce (M300) must be satisfied.  Most students choose to study 4 units per trimester, and usually undertake 2 trimesters each year.

To complete the course you must include:-

  • 12 credit points of Property and Real Estate core units
  • 4 credit points of Commerce core units
  • 4 credit points of core units common to both the Bachelor of Property and Real Estate and the Bachelor of Commerce
  • an 8 credit point major sequence from the Bachelor of Commerce
  • 4 credit points of elective units (which may include a major sequence from the Bachelor of Property and Real Estate)
  • Level 3 - at least 6 credit points (of which a minimum of 4 credit points must be course grouped to a Faculty of Business and Law undergraduate degree)

Course structure

Units

Bachelor of Commerce core units

MIS171Business Analytics

MMK101Marketing Fundamentals

MMM132Management

MWL101Personal Insight

Bachelor of Property and Real Estate core units

MMP111Introduction to Property

MMP122Introduction to Property Development

MMP121Property Law and Practice

SRT112Sustainable Construction *

MMP211Statutory Valuation

MMP212Property Investment

MMP213Property Economics

SRT214Commercial Property Construction Studies ^

MMP221Property Management

MMP222Advanced Property Development

MMP311Advanced Property Valuation

MMP321Advanced Property Analysis

*previously coded MMP112

^previously coded MMP214

Common core units

MAA103Accounting for Decision Making

MAE101Economic Principles

MLC101Law for Commerce

MAF101Fundamentals of Finance

Plus an 8 credit point Bachelor of Commerce major sequence

Plus completion of 4 credit points of elective units (which may include a Bachelor of Property and Real Estate major sequence)


Please note:The eligibility of students for membership of the accrediting body is subject to meeting the requirements of that body and that Deakin makes no representations that individuals will meet those requirements.