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HPS111 - Introduction to Psychology A

Note: You are seeing the 2012 view of this unit information. These details may no longer be current. [Go to the current version]
Enrolment modes:(B, CBD, G, W, X)
Credit point(s):1
Offerings:

Trimester 1 (B, CBD, G, W, X), Trimester 2 (X), Trimester 3 (X)

EFTSL value: 0.125
Unit chair:

S Horwood (W)

Trimester 3 2012: B Wilkie (B) and S Horwood (W)

Contact hours:

6 hours per fortnight - 1 x 2 hour lecture (or equivalent) per week, 1 x 2 hour practical (or equivalent) per fortnight

Note: Online teaching methods require internet access. Please refer to the most current computer specifications.

Content

The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the discipline of psychology as a behavioural science. Students are introduced to basic theories in psychology, methods used in the practice of psychology, and the importance of evidence-based practice in several professions within psychology. The unit runs in two streams: The first is text based and aligns with weekly lectures and guest speakers. The second is skills based and runs through the tutorials. The unit begins with a history of the evolution of psychology as a discipline. We explore the fundamental questions that motivate the field and the major milestones in the development of psychology as a recognised scientific discipline. In this context, we provide an overview of the scientific method and its relevance to psychological research, and discuss ethics and other key issues that arise in the process of acquiring and applying knowledge. The unit then reviews the current state of knowledge in the field. First, we provide an overview of three theoretical approaches to understanding behaviour; these include biological bases of behaviour, environmental and experiential influences on behaviour, and the role of our thoughts and feelings on our behaviour (i.e. cognitive psychology).

 

Areas covered include (Trimester 1 and Trimester 2):

Brain and Behaviour, Learning, Consciousness and Thinking. Students are then introduced to Cultural and Indigenous Psychology, and three professional areas of psychology, Forensic, Neuropsychology and Health Psychology. Students learn about evidence-based practice, how to use theories to understand behaviour, and cover the areas of Stress, Health and Wellbeing. In the tutorial stream students learn critical-thinking and counselling skills.

 

Areas covered include (Trimester 3):

Biological Bases of psychology, Learning, Consciousness and Thinking. Students will develop an understanding about how individual Perceptions shape their experience of reality, and how Intelligence is shaped by biology and the environment. Students learn about evidence-based practice, how to use theories to understand behaviour.

Assessment

Trimester 1 and Trimester 2: Examination (2 hours) 45%, online orientation and assignment preparation module 10%, assignment (1500 words) 35%, group presentation (approximately 10 minutes) 10%

Trimester 3: Examination (2 hours) 40%, online research presentation 25%, assignment (1500 words) 35%

Prescribed texts

Gazzaniga, M., Heatherton, T., & Halpern, D. (2009). Psychological Science (3rd ed.). New York:  Norton & Co.

From Trimester 3 2012 this text is replaced by:

Passer, Psychology + Connect Access Card, McGraw Hill

 

Burton, L. (2009). An interactive approach to writing essays and research reports in Psychology (3rd ed.). Milton Qld: Wily & Sons.

Unit Fee Information

Student Contribution Rate*Student Contribution Rate**Student Contribution Rate***Fee rate - Domestic Students Fee rate - International students
$706$706$706$2542$2714

* Student contribution rate for Commonwealth Supported students who commenced studies from 2010
** Student contribution rate for Commonwealth Supported students who commenced studies from 2009
*** Student contribution rate for Commonwealth Supported students who commenced studies from 2008
Please note: Unit fees listed do not apply to Deakin Prime students.

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8th June 2007