Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science

Course summary for international students

Year2017 course information
Award granted Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science
CampusOffered at Waurn Ponds (Geelong)
Cloud CampusNo
Length3 years full-time or part-time equivalent
Next available intake

March (Trimester 1), July (Trimester 2)

Tuition fee rateAvailable fee rates for 2017 can be found at www.deakin.edu.au/fees
LevelUndergraduate
CRICOS course code075365F
Clearly-in ATAR
Waurn Ponds (Geelong): 60.15
English language requirements

Overall IELTS score of 6.0 with no band less than 6.0 (or equivalent). More information is available at www.ielts.org

VTAC Codes1400315483 - Waurn Ponds (Geelong), International full-fee paying place
Deakin course code S369
Faculty contacts

Deakin International
Tel +61 3 9627 4877
Online enquiry

Course sub-headings

Course overview

Study Zoology and Animal Science at Deakin and you’ll gain a broad understanding of the current field of zoology with an emphasis on the latest research and the development of practical and evidence-based decision-making skills.

The course has a strong focus on Australian fauna and its unique importance in the global environment. Throughout your course you’ll explore the potential effects environmental change may have on the evolution, disease and physiology of animals and how they adapt to a changing environment. The social and economic impact that human activity has on animals and their ecosystems will also be highlighted.

You’ll have the opportunity to learn from experienced staff, and combine your on-campus work with off-campus excursions.

As a graduate you may find career opportunities in a range of areas including environmental monitoring and management, wildlife biology, private environmental consulting, government quarantine, museums and zoological research. Successful completion of the course may also lead to opportunities for further study including postgraduate research training both in Australia and overseas.

Units in the course may include assessment hurdle requirements.

Fees and charges

Fees and charges vary depending on your course, your fee category and the year you started. To find out about the fees and charges that apply to you, visit www.deakin.edu.au/fees.

Career opportunities

Students with this degree may be employed as research assistants, environmental managers, quarantine officers, pest management officers, collection managers of aquaria and zoological gardens, primary and secondary teachers (with suitable teaching qualifications), museum curators (with suitable postgraduate degrees), research scientists (with suitable postgraduate degrees), university academics (with suitable postgraduate degrees).

Students with this degree may be suited to undertake postgraduate research training either in Australia or overseas. Students with the zoology degree plus suitable postgraduate qualifications may then be employed as research scientists, university academics, museum curators.

Course Learning Outcomes

Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes (DGLOs)

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

Minimum Standards

1. Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities: appropriate to the level of study related to a discipline or profession.

  • Apply a broad and coherent knowledge of chemistry, zoology and their environment to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of scientific concepts and methods in the study of zoology and animal science.
  • Apply technical knowledge and skills and use them in a range of activities, in a professional setting; this application of technical knowledge and skills being characterised by demonstrable in-depth knowledge of scientific methods and tools; and demonstrable proficiency in the utilisation of scientific facts, principles and practices.
  • Demonstrate an integrated knowledge, autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility to investigate, test, analyse, and evaluate scientific data and to argue about characteristics and aspects of scientific theories in the advancement of zoology and animal science.
  • Apply knowledge of the scientific disciplines of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and the environment to demonstrate a deep understanding of how science works in the study of animals in their habitat, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habitats and distribution of all animals both living and extinct.
  • Consistently and autonomously select and apply technical knowledge and skills to determine acceptable scientific methods of inquiry for observation, experimentation and inference of scientific data in order to undertake work in a range of professional or research contexts within zoology and animal science.
  • Use of hypotheses, laws, facts and theories to integrate and apply knowledge and skills safely, within diverse science contexts, to collect and analyse scientific data, to evaluate and investigate of scientific problems; interpret and present logical arguments and results taking into account multiple perspectives including ethical, social and political factors underlying scientific breakthroughs.

2. Communication: using oral, written and interpersonal communication to inform, motivate and effect change.

  • Use oral, written, graphical and interpersonal communication skills to accommodate, encourage, and answer audience questions in a professional manner.
  • Present details of scientific procedures, key observations, results and conclusions using appropriate scientific language and conventions to share and disseminate information and knowledge in a clear and coherent manner.
  • Apply well-developed interpersonal skills including listening skills, and use a variety of techniques to send, receive and process information in order to communicate effectively in a range of contexts with both specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  • Consistently document and communicate details of scientific procedures, key observations, results, conclusions and logical arguments within the context of the zoological and animal sciences in order to elaborate and explain on the meaning and implication of scientific results, information, or arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

3. Digital literacy: using technologies to find, use and disseminate information.

  • Apply well-developed scientific information literacy skills to independently locate, interpret, evaluate the merits of, and synthesise information in a digital world using an advanced working knowledge of relevant bibliographic software applications.
  • Reflect on, create and ethically share knowledge and information to a variety of audiences to demonstrate the ability to adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts.

 

  • Use sophisticated search strategies in bibliographic software to independently retrieve a comprehensive range of relevant resources and apply scientific reasoning techniques to analyse and synthesise accurate and relevant information to support a contention or argument.
  • Systematically and methodically discriminate between assertions, personal opinion and information sustained by robust evidence, confidently test, contest, formulate and ethically share hypotheses using a variety of digital technologies and techniques.

4.  Critical thinking: evaluating information using critical and analytical thinking and judgment.

  • Locate and evaluate scientific information from multiple sources and use scientific methods and frameworks to structure and plan observations, experimentation or fieldwork investigations.
  • Use critical and analytical thinking and judgement to analyse, synthesise and generate an integrated knowledge, formulate hypotheses and test them against evidence-based scientific concepts and principles in the field of zoology and animal science.
  • Collect, record and evaluate scientific information or data from a variety of sources including self-selected sources and criteria related to the aims of the inquiry using appropriate methodologies to assess scientific questions.
  • Reveal insightful patterns, differences or similarities by interpreting and evaluating complex view points by asking rigorous questions to formulate hypotheses and test them against scientific facts, laws, principles and evidence.

5.  Problem solving: creating solutions to authentic (real world and ill-defined) problems.

  • Use initiative and creativity in planning, identifying and using multiple approaches to recognise, clarify, construct and solutions to real world (authentic) problems in zoology and animal science.
  • Advocate scientific methodologies, hypotheses, laws, facts and principles to create solutions to authentic real world problems in zoology and animal science taking into account relevant contextual factors.
  • Propose one or more creative solutions that indicates a deep comprehension of the problem, ability to prioritise tasks, reflect on possibilities, judge the pros and cons of various solutions within the context of zoology and animal science and formulate a logical solution.
  • Provide detailed and insightful scientific explanation and guidance to implement solutions in a manner that addresses multiple contextual factors and facets of the problem in the animal world.

6.  Self-management: working and learning independently, and taking responsibility for personal actions.

  • Take personal, professional and social responsibility within changing professional science contexts to develop autonomy as learners and evaluate own performance.
  • Work autonomously, responsibly, ethically and safely to solve unstructured problems and actively apply knowledge of regulatory frameworks and scientific methodologies to make informed choices.
  • Consistently consider the scientific context, background information, ethical consideration and intellectual property issues to demonstrate a framework of accountability, honesty and responsibility for own scientific learning.
  • Practice safety policies, compliance procedures and follow regulations when investigating, experimenting or conducting fieldwork and present data and evidence collected with accuracy and rigour, while acknowledging the contributions made by others.

7. Teamwork: working and learning with others from different disciplines and backgrounds.

  • Work independently and collaboratively as a team to contribute towards achieving team goals and thereby demonstrate interpersonal skills including the ability to brainstorm, negotiate, resolve conflicts, managing difficult and awkward conversations, provide constructive feedback and work in diverse professional, social and cultural contexts.
  • Consistently complete all assigned tasks by deadline, proactively assist others, lead, contribute to ideas and teamwork by engaging in research, constructive discussions, debates, arguments and dissemination of information in a manner that resolves conflicts and germinates ideas for further exploration.

8.  Global citizenship: engaging ethically and productively in the professional context and with diverse communities and cultures in a global context

  • Apply scientific knowledge and skills with a high level of autonomy, judgement, responsibility and accountability in collaboration with others to articulate the place and importance of zoology and animal science in the local and global context.
  • Demonstrate ethical, professional, social and cultural awareness and apply a framework of accountability, honesty and responsibility that indicates professionalism, objectivity and an unbiased position when working with others, including members of the society.

Approved by Faculty Board 14 July 2016

Course rules

To complete the Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science, students must attain 24 credit points. Most units (think of units as ‘subjects’) are equal to 1 credit point. So that means in order to gain 24 credit points, you’ll need to study 24 units (AKA ‘subjects’) over your entire degree. Most students choose to study 4 units per trimester, and usually undertake two trimesters each year.

The 24 credit points include 17 core units (these are compulsory) and 7 elective units (you can choose which ones to study).  

Course structure

Core

Level 1 - Trimester 1

SLE010Laboratory and Fieldwork Safety Induction Program (0 credit points)

SLE111Cells and Genes

SLE103Ecology and the Environment

SLE133Chemistry in Our World ^ or one elective unit

plus one elective unit

Level 1 - Trimester 2

SLE132Biology: Form and Function

SLE123Physics for the Life Sciences

SLE102Physical Geography

SLE155Chemistry for the Professional Sciences ^ or one elective unit

^Note: Students who have not completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE133 Chemistry in Our World in Trimester 1.  Students who have completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences in Trimester 2.


 

Level 2 - Trimester 1

SLE204Animal Diversity

SLE251Research Methods and Data Analysis

SLE263Marine and Coastal Ecosystems

plus one elective unit

Level 2 - Trimester 2

SLE205Vertebrate Structure and Function

SLE254Genetics

SLE224Animal Behaviour

plus one elective unit

Level 2 - Trimester 3

SLE355Evolutionary and Ecological Physiology (Tri-3)


 

Level 3 - Trimester 1

SLE397Sensory Neurobiology and Behaviour

SLE372Evolutionary Ecology

SLE341Ecological and Conservation Genetics

plus one elective unit

Level 3 - Trimester 2

SLE354Disease Ecology and Epidemiology

plus two elective units

Electives

Select from the range of elective units offered across many courses, including, in some cases, the option to choose elective units from a completely different field (subject to meeting unit requirements).

Entry requirements - general

General admission requirements for entry into undergraduate courses for international students at Deakin are summarised in the undergraduate admission requirements table (194kb).
Some courses may have additional entry requirements.
Students must also meet the undergraduate English language requirements.

Credit for prior learning - general

If you have completed previous studies which you believe may reduce the number of units you have to complete at Deakin, indicate in the appropriate section on your application that you wish to be considered for credit for prior learning. You will need to provide a certified copy of your previous course details so your credit can be determined. If you are eligible, your offer letter will then contain information about your credit for prior learning.

Your credit for prior learning is formally approved prior to your enrolment at Deakin during the Enrolment and Orientation Program. You must bring original documents relating to your previous study so that this approval can occur.

You can also refer to the Credit for Prior Learning System which outlines the credit that may be granted towards a Deakin University degree.

How to apply

Tracking your application
If you have already applied and wish to enquire about your application please refer to the relevant area through which you originally applied.

  • If you applied through a Deakin representative please contact your representative.
  • If you applied through a Deakin International office please contact deakin-int-admissions@deakin.edu.au

Workload

You can expect to participate in a range of teaching activities each week. This could include classes, seminars, practicals and online interaction. You can refer to the individual unit details in the course structure for more information. You will also need to study and complete assessment tasks in your own time.

Work experience

You’ll have the opportunity to undertake a discipline-specific industry placement as part of your course. deakin.edu.au/sebe/students/wil.