Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research

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Summary of projects


This web page contains the summaries of projects funded from 2009 onwards where a QPS member is the lead investigator.

Funding Ending 2013

Project: Evaluation of the Goldfields Kidney Disease Nursing Management Program
Investigators: Bennett, P. O'Connell, B
Funding body: Council of Australian Governments (COAG)
Funded period: 2011-2013
Lay summary: The Goldfields Kidney Disease Nursing Management Program (GKDNMP) is a three year Western Australian Country Health Services (WACHS) program that is part of a suite of programs supporting the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) "Closing the Gap" policy which aims to reduce the gap in health indicators between non-indigenous and indigenous Australians. The aim of the GKDNMP is to provide comprehensive prevention, health promotion, screening and early identification, education, case management and tertiary care for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people within the region. The GKDNMP is managed by specialist nurses and engages key staff including medical, rural and remote, Aboriginal Health Workers and administrative staff. The program is focussed on the delivery of services to prevent and manage services related to chronic kidney disease. Deakin University has been charged with evaluating the 3 year program against the COAG Closing the Gap indicators.

Project: Self management strategy to improve fluid adherence for people receiving haemodialysis
Investigators: Bennett, P. Bonner, A
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2011-2013
Lay summary: People living with chronic kidney disease requiring haemodialysis are faced with strict fluid adherence requirements. The Communications Compatibility System (CCS) contains a set of cards containing specific photos, illustrations and words that facilitate a patient driven goal setting approach. The tools can be used in researcher/patient sessions to generate open and honest communication. The aim is to measure the effect of the CCS approach on the self management and treatment adherence of people with CKD requiring haemodialysis

Project: The Efficacy of a Referral and Physical Activity Program for Survivors of Prostate Cancer
Investigators: Livingston, P; Salmon, J; Courneya, K; Gaskin, C; Botti, M; Broadbent, S; Kent, B.
Funding body: Australian Research Council (ARC)
Funded period: 2011-2013
Lay summary: Although survival rates are at approximately 83% with earlier detection and improved treatment modalities, prostate cancer survivors are at increased risk of dying from co-morbidities, which may be prevented or ameliorated through participation in physical activity. This project aims to establish an effective and sustainable referral and physical activity program to improve the health outcomes of prostate cancer survivors by utilising the influence of clinicians in their delivery of information to patients. This concept of a referral and physical activity program has the potential to translate across all cancer tumour streams to reduce the physiological and psychological burden associated with living with cancer.

Funding Ending 2012

Project: Development of the Pressure Injury Prevention Research (PIPR) Group: Stage One
Investigators: Kent, B; Bucknall, T; Hutchison, A; Chaboyer, W; Rickard, C.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2011-2012
Lay summary: This is the first of a number of studies from a new collaboration with researchers from Griffith University. The overall aim is to undertake a series of inter-related studies related to pressure injury (PI) prevention in acute care patients.

This study and its associated program of research will lead to NHMRC grant applications, one of which will draw on knowledge translation theories to test an intervention to implement newly revised clinical practice guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention among acutely ill hospitalised adults.

This first study aims to:
1) Identify current hospital PI practices in the acute care settings;
2) Identify barriers to the uptake of PI clinical practice guidelines in public and private acute care settings.

Project: Managing behaviours of concern in residential aged care facilities
Investigators: Lakhan, P.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2011-2012
Lay summary: A number of behaviours of concern, such as physical aggression and disruptive vocalisation, may be displayed by residents in high care residential aged care facilities. The Tri-Focal Model of Care is an evidence-based set of recommendations for managing these behaviours. The aims of this project are to obtain baseline information on practices used by nurses and the challenges they experience in managing these behaviours. The extent to which these practices align with recommended practices will be described. The project will develop a methodology for identifying gaps in knowledge translation in aged care facilities. The project is significant because it will identify the extent to which knowledge related to managing behaviours of concern is translated into practice and make recommendations for changes in practice to enhance the quality of care provided to these residents.

Project: Improving quality of life outcomes for people with multiple myeloma
Investigators: Livingston, PM; Botti, M; Craike, MJ; Hose, K; Harrison, S; Courneya, K; Hordern, A.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2011-2012
Lay summary: The significance of this study lies in the advancement of knowledge about symptom management through participation in physical activity for people with multiple myeloma. The aim of this research is to gain an in-depth understanding of physical activity experiences and preferences throughout the illness trajectory for people diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Physical activity has the potential to alleviate disease and treatment related symptoms, reduce depression and improve the quality of life of people with multiple myeloma. The results will support the development of ARC or NHMRC funding applications that test the efficacy of evidence-based, targeted physical activity interventions for people with multiple myeloma.

Project: The McKellar Model - Prevention, safety and optimal management of residents with diabetes in residential aged care
Investigators: Dunning, P.
Funded period: 2011-2012
Funding body: Department of Health, Victoria
Lay summary: The project concerns pilot testing the Guiding Principles for Managing Diabetes in Residential Aged Care (RAC) Settings. The key focus of the Guiding Principles is safety, risk management and quality care. The project will: validate the Guiding Principles by determining their acceptability, usability and feasibility when implemented in a RAC, develop an education program to facilitate the future implementation of the Guiding Principles, and develop an evaluation framework that can be linked to the Aged Care Accreditation Standards and provide objective measures of diabetes nursing care.

Funding Ending 2011

Project: Translation of evidence into pain management practices in acute care environments
Investigators: Botti, M; Kent, B; Bucknall, T; Johnstone, MJ; Duke, Maxine; Considine, J; Watts, Rosemary; Redley, B; de Steiger, R.
Funding body: Australian Research Council in collaboration with Deakin University, Cabrini Health, Eastern Health and Epworth Healthcare
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: Post surgical pain management is a care process known to be highly variable and inadequate. Over 40% of patients experience unnecessary pain and increased associated risks following surgery. The aim is to develop in collaboration with clinicians an improved method of treating pain using a clinical decision support system, design and evaluate the implementation process for enhanced and sustained adherence, then evaluate the system in two other sites to determine external applicability.

Project: Responding to medical emergencies: system characteristics under examination (RESCUE) - point prevalence study
Investigators: Bucknall, T; Jones, D; Barrett, E; Bellomo, R; Ruseckaite, R.
Funding body: Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care
Funded period: 2009-2011
Lay summary: This is a multi-centre prospective observational study to assess the prevalence and outcomes of undetected medical emergencies. Six public hospitals and four private hospitals were involved in the study. The study showed the prevalence of deteriorating patients in acute care and the patient outcomes when nurses fail to activate medical emergencies.

Project: Implementation of a symptom assessment instrument to inform decision making in palliative care
Investigators: Bucknall, T; Hutchinson, A; Sales, A; Essen, J.
Funding body: Cabrini Health (Cabrini Institute)
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: The aim of this study is to assess the effects of an audit and feedback intervention on nurses' symptom management decisions in palliative care. One technique commonly used to change behaviour is performance feedback. This proposal will examine the effectiveness of different types of feedback on nurses' symptom management and their intention to change behavior and improve performance.

Project: Detailed analysis of unplanned transfer from subacute to acute care
Investigators: Considine, J; Botti, M; O'Connell, B; Kent, B; Dunning, T; Street M.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University.
Funded period: 2011
Lay summary: Patients in subacute care facilities (such as rehabilitation) may deteriorate and need transfer to emergency departments. The aim of this study is to undertake a detailed analysis of these unplanned patient transfers from subacute to acute care. A recent small study showed that 75% of patients transferred from subacute care to acute care needed hospital admission; 15% of these patients died. A number of patient-related factors in the 24 hours preceding transfer, and on arrival to the emergency department, were associated with in-hospital death. In this large, multi-site study we will examine the prevalence of factors associated with in-hospital death and whether these factors can be used to identify deterioration earlier and either prevent the need for transfer or facilitate earlier transfer to emergency departments at acute care hospitals.

Project: Implementing handover quality improvement tools into post-anaesthetic care units
Investigators: Currey, J; Redley, B; Botti, M.
Funding body: Central Research Grant Scheme, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: The effectiveness of the evidence-based Knowledge-to-Action implementation strategy on facilitating the uptake of handover improvement processes by multidisciplinary clinicians in the post-anaesthetic care unit is being evaluated. We anticipate this strategy will improve handover processes and lead to risk minimisation, thereby improving the quality and safety of patient care.

Project: Managing patients with a ventricular assist device (VAD): An exploration of international models for community-based care
Investigators: Currey, J; Snell, R.; Jones, K.; Botti, M.
Funding body: Deakin University Central Research Grant Scheme
Funded period: 2008-2011
Lay summary: This project aims to develop a systematic understanding of the current models for supporting community-based patients with ventricular assist devices (artificial hearts) inserted. Specifically we aim to improve patient care by gaining a deeper understanding of the practical, educational, and infrastructure requirements.

Project: Video analysis of interprofessional communication and decision making to manage sedation therapy in intensive care
Investigators: Currey, J; Bucknall, T; Manias, E; Pilcher, D; Ruseckaite, R.
Funding body: Australian College of Critical Care Nurses
Funded period: 2008-2011
Lay summary: Video analysis of the multidisciplinary round to track plans of care, decision making, documentation and the implementation of sedation management will be undertaken. Findings will inform strategies for clinicians to enhance communication, and minimise sedation therapy to facilitate enhanced patient recoveries with the aim of preventing adverse events in intensive care.

Project: Developing guidelines for managing diabetes in residential aged care settings
Investigators: Dunning, P.
Funded period: 2009-2011
Funding body: Percy Baxter Foundation
Lay summary: The aim of the project is to develop guidelines for managing people with diabetes in RACs with a focus on individualised care considering the individual's level of risk, life stage, physical, mental and spiritual status, and their Advanced Care Directives.

Project: Review for the Australian diabetes educators association credentialling and re-credentialing Program
Investigators: Dunning, P.
Funded period: 2010-2011
Funding body: Australian Diabetes Educators Association
Lay summary: The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) is recognised nationally and internationally as a principal organisation providing education, support and direction for health professionals providing education and care to people with diabetes and their family, carers and colleagues. The pivotal function of the ADEA is providing members the prospect to demonstrate proficiency in their role as a Diabetes Educator by undertaking a professional credentialing process. The ADEA Credentialing program has not been reviewed for over ten years. The review will ensure the Credentialing and Re-Credentialing processes are appropriate, relevant and contemporary and will therefore assist the ADEA to appropriately endorse and promote the professional recognition of Credentialed Diabetes Educators.

Project: Nurses' experiences of ethical preparedness for catastrophic public health emergencies and health care disasters: a systematic review of qualitative evidence
Investigators: Johnstone, MJ and Turale, S.
Funding body: QPS Strategic Research Centre and Deakin University School of Nursing and Midwifery.
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: Public health emergencies and health care disasters pose ethical problems not normally experienced in everyday civilian health care. Nurses constitute the largest workforce within the healthcare system and are pivotal to any coordinated response to a public health emergency or health care disaster involving mass casualties. The ethical preparedness of health professionals, including nurses, to operationalise altered standards of care (also called crisis standards of care) is open to question. So too is the ethical preparedness of health professionals to operationalise altered/crisis standards of professional ethics. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to systematically review research literature reporting nurses' experiences of ethical preparedness for dealing with catastrophic public health emergencies and health care disasters and the ethical quandaries that may arise during such events.

Project: Raising awareness of organ and tissue donation among tertiary education students: doing it their way.
Investigators: Kent, B; Radford, S; Sidhu, J; Brean,S.
Funding body: The Australian Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Authority.
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: This project involved a partnership between Deakin University, Box Hill Institute of TAFE and Eastern Health to deliver an organ and tissue donation awareness program targeted at the tertiary student population. It was funded by the Australian Government Organ and Tissue Authority. We focused attention on university and TAFE students using a mixed method design including survey and market-research road-shows. This study generated one of the largest datasets of information from this population worldwide. Thus data and the conclusion drawn from these have considerable applicability to other tertiary establishments and their students across Australia.

Project: Transforming care: enhancing the patient's experience of care in Eastern Health
Investigators: Kent, B; Street, M; Blencowe, P; Patterson, D; Plunkett, D.
Funding body: Eastern Health - Box Hill Hospital.
Funded period: 2009-2011
Lay summary: At two sites, clinical nursing issues, including adverse events, high staff turnover and significant EFT deficits, led the Directors of Nursing to explore programs or processes that could be instigated in several key wards and units. The adoption of the Transforming Care program sought to increase the amount of time nurses spend with patients, enhance patient safety by reducing adverse events, and improve the teamwork and leadership in the clinical settings. There has been baseline data collected including falls, pressure ulcers, patient satisfaction and workplace satisfaction, these were then remeasured at key time intervals to identify if the changes made to the ward are making a difference.
Patients play an important role in this practice improvement project and their satisfaction views were actively sought so that changes could be made in response to their feedback.
This transforming care initiative is different to many others in that its focus is on engaging frontline staff and unit managers; they identify the evidence-based ideas for transforming the way care is delivered on wards or units.

Project: Evaluating the impact of continuity of midwifery care on gestational weight gain for women who are obese
Investigators: Nagle, C; Skouteris, H; Hotchin, A; Patterson, D; Teale, G.
Funding body: Central Research Grant Scheme, Deakin University.
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: It is estimated that 52% of women in Australia are overweight or obese and the trend is increasing faster in younger women. Maternal obesity is a well recognised risk factor increasing maternal risks for complications in pregnancy, labour and birth and postnatally. The impact is pervasive with maternal obesity also being associated with lower breastfeeding rates, obesity in childhood and chronic illnesses in the long term. While the positive effects of continuity of midwifery care have been established in low risk populations, the impact on high risk populations is less well understood. The primary aim of this RCT is to evaluate the effect of different models of pregnancy care on preventing excessive weight gain during pregnancy for women who are obese.

Project: Towards community aged care reform: Design and evaluation of a seamless, flexible service model
Investigators: Ottmann, G; Laragy, C; Allen, J; Naughtin, G.
Funding body: Australian Research Council, Helen Macpherson Smith Trust, Percy Baxter Charitable Trust, B B Hutchings Bequest and John William Fleming Trust
Funded period: 2009-2011
Lay summary: Key white papers alert to major challenges to the Australian aged care system that urgently call for new and creative responses. Reports highlight that the current system lacks flexibility and quality to deal with these challenges. The People at Centre Stage project seeks to address these issues through the design, pilot and evaluation a seamless, flexible service model for community-based aged care that increases both the choice and control older people and their carers have over the services they receive. It is expected that the model will deliver better health outcomes and consumer satisfaction at equal costs.

Project: Post-anaesthetic discharge scoring criteria: A comprehensive systematic review
Investigators: Phillips, N; Street, M; Kent, B.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: This project aims to systematically examine the evidence to identify the essential components of an effective discharge scoring system to assess patients immediately following anaesthetic and surgery. There are two components to the study; a systematic review of the literature and an audit of the prevalence and nature of adverse events at Eastern Health. The findings of the systematic review demonstrated general agreement amongst the studies, that PACU discharge assessment consider levels of pain, conscious state, and nausea and vomiting. Findings from the literature review, in conjunction with those revealed from the Eastern Health audit, will contribute to enhancing post-operative patient safety through timely and appropriate discharge from recovery room.

Project: Self-management strategies used by women with Type-1 diabetes in their transition to motherhood: Questionnaire development.
Principal researcher: Rasmussen, B; Botti, M. Speight, J. Dunning, T. Jenkins, A; Ward, G.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University and Novo Nordisk Pharmaceutical
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: The project aims to develop and validate a questionnaire to determine the self-management strategies women with Type 1 diabetes use in the transition to motherhood. Specifically, the team aim to develop to promote health capacity-building for woment with Type 1 diabetes and help health professionals set priorities and goals of care that encompass the various factors operating during life transitions.

Project: Older Persons Care Model Review
Investigators: Redley, B.
Funding body: Southern Health
Funded period: 2011
Lay summary: A review panel will examine acute and sub-acute services for emergency medical patients aged over 65 years of age to identify strategic changes to Southern Health's service structure, resources and models of care necessary to efficiently and effectively deliver high quality services for older people into the next 5 to 10 years.

Project: Identifying the core competencies of Mental Health Triage: An observational study
Investigators: Sands, N; Elsom, S; Henderson; K; Keppich-Arnold, S.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: This pilot project aims to address the current knowledge gap on the core competencies of Mental Health Triage (MHT). Through a series of structured observations on approximately 150 occasions of MHT, the research team aims to identify and articulate the key role tasks, skills, knowledge and responsibilities (competencies) MHT clinicians are required to be competent in to perform safe and effective triage.

Funding Ending 2010

Project: Patient outcomes after open and minimally invasive surgery for prostate cancer
Investigators: Botti, M; Costello, A; O'Connell, B; Lo, S.
Funding body: Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia
Funded period: 2008-2010
Lay summary: In Australia, the most common treatment for localised prostate cancer is prostatectomy surgery. Patients' physiological, functional, psychosocial and cognitive outcomes following prostatectomy has not been investigated adequately, however. Prostatectomy surgery includes traditional open radical prostatectomy and minimally invasive surgery including robotic-assisted prostatectomy surgery. This longitudinal study examines patient outcomes after open and minimally invasive surgery for prostate cancer. A unique collaborative research team consisting of surgeons, academics and specialist urology nurses has been established to undertake this study.

Project: Mapping information needs and symptom management of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients
Investigators: Bucknall, T; Senior J; MacIndoe J; Richardson, G; Smenda, H.
Funding body: Private donors (Cabrini Health)
Funded period: 2008-2010
Lay summary: This study will explore the information sought by patients from the Breastcare nurse during and after their active treatments, the timing of the information being sought and the uptake of the information to manage symptoms. The study showed the trajectory of patient information needs as they receive treatment for newly diagnosed breast cancer and the impact the information use had on their symptom management.

Project: A randomised controlled trial of individualised medicine education for people with type 2 diabetes
Investigators: Dunning, T; Savage, S; Muir, P.
Funding body: Australian Diabetes Society
Funded period: 2009-2010
Lay summary: The aim of the research is to determine whether personalised medicine self-management education delivered by diabetes educators improves medicine-related self-care and adherence. A randomised controlled trial is being conducted involving sixty-six people with type 2 diabetes. Each participant is being randomised to either a usual care group or a group that receives individualised medicine education relevant to the diabetes medicines the individual is prescribed.

Project: Education modules for managing diabetes in older people
Investigators: Dunning, T.
Funded period: 2010
Funding body: Australian Diabetes Educators Association
Lay summary: The aims of the project were to develop self-directed learning modules to assist aged care workers (ACW), nurses (RN) and diabetes educators (DE) working with older people with diabetes to deliver effective, safe diabetes care that maintains or improves their quality of life and independence within the individual's capabilities and to help ACWs, RNs and DEs understand and work within their level of competence and scope of practice relevant to providing care for older people with diabetes. The content of the modules is evidence-based, holistic age-appropriate care for older people with diabetes living in community settings and in residential aged care facilities

Project: Point prevalence survey of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) use undertaken in The Geelong Hospital and the McKellar Centre in 2010
Investigators: Dunning, T.
Funding body: Barwon Health
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: Population studies show over 70% of the Australian population uses complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and often do not tell their conventional practitioners about their CAM use. A point prevalence study was undertaken in The Geelong Hospital and the McKellar Centre that aimed to determine: the prevalence of CAM use, the characteristics of CAM users, whether the profile of CAM users and the reasons patients used CAM were consistent with the literature, and whether the Barwon Health CAM polices and guidelines need to be revised in light of the findings.

Project: Evaluation of the tri-focal model of residential aged care
Investigators: Gaskin, C; Palermo, G; O'Connell, B.
Funding body: Central Research Grant Scheme, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: This study is evaluating the efficacy of an innovative model of care for residential aged care. Our cross-disciplinary team is using an experimental design to evaluate the Tri-Focal Model of Care, which purports to improve care through fostering (1) evidence-based practice, (2) positive work environments, and (3) partnership-centred care. Findings will inform workforce development initiatives to improve quality of care in the rapidly expanding Australian residential aged care sector.

Project: Managing complex healthcare units: an exploratory study
Investigators: Gaskin, C; O'Connell, B; Ockerby, C; Russell, V.
Funding body: Central Research Grant Scheme, Deakin University.
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: Nurse unit managers (NUMs) work in complex and challenging environments. In this study, NUMs, Directors of Nursing, and nurses are being interviewed to gain an understanding of how NUMs manage challenging issues on hospital wards, so that appropriate, tailored interventions can be introduced to improve the effectiveness of NUMs.

Project: Interprofessional interaction and knowledge translation: A systematic review
Investigators: Hutchinson, A; Bucknall, T; Sales, A; Kent, B; Botti, M; Brand, C.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: Scholars in the field of knowledge translation have identified a substantial gap between the availability of research evidence and the application of that evidence in practice - often referred to as the research-practice gap. The purpose of this study is to systematically review research literature reporting the effect of social interaction between health professionals on the translation of knowledge into practice. Specific objectives are (1) to determine what effect interdisciplinary interaction has on the translation of knowledge into practice, and (2) to identify gaps and weaknesses in the evidence base in order to inform the development of future research in the field.

Project: Exploring midwives' communication with women of the risk of low to moderate alcohol consumption in pregnancy
Investigators: Nagle, C; Foster, D; Halliday, J; Philips, D.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: The safety and quality of pregnancy care relies on midwives obtaining an accurate history from the pregnant women to assess clinical risk factors and accurately communicate risk information. This project will inform future research investigating the dose response of low to moderate alcohol use in pregnancy by providing a better understanding of current midwifery practice and the barriers and facilitators to the communication of risk.

Project: Residential aged care continence assessment tool project
Investigators: O'Connell, B; Ostaszkiewicz, J;
Funding body: Department of Health and Ageing
Funded period: 2007-2010
Lay summary: The aim of the project is to develop and evaluate a suite of continence assessment and management tools for use in residential aged care, supported by education resources. After a successful pilot in several states, the tools are now nationally available and are under consideration as supporting documents for the Aged Care Funding Instrument.

Project: Development of a research agenda in community-based disability care
Investigators: Ottmann, G; Gaskin, C.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: In collaboration with major stakeholder in the field of disability care, the project seeks to develop a research agenda for community-based disability care.

Project: Evaluation of Latrobe regional health mental health triage service
Investigators: Sands, N; Gerdtz, M; Elsom, S.
Funding body: Latrobe Regional Health Service, Mental health and Drugs Division
Funded period: 2009-2010
Lay summary: The aim of this project is to evaluate the outcomes and impact of the LRH Mental Health Triage program

Project: Defining the core competencies of mental health telephone triage: An observational study
Investigators: Sands, N. Elsom, S; Gerdtz, M. Henderson, K; Keppich-Arnold, S.
Funding body: The Alfred Hospital
Funded period: 2010-2011
Lay summary: This pilot project aimed to address the current knowledge gap on the core competencies of MHT. Through a series of structured observations on approximately 150 occasions of MHT, the research team aims to identify and articulate the key role tasks, skills, knowledge and responsibilities (competencies) MHT clinicians are required to be competent in to perform safe and effective mental health triage.

Project: Validating the clinical descriptors of the ATS mental health triage sub-scale
Investigators: Sands, N; Gerdtz, M; Hosking, J; Berk, M.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2010
Lay summary: The aim of this project is to investigate the validity of the clinical descriptors of the Australasian Triage Scale, mental health triage sub-scale.
Funding Ended 2009

Project: Interprofessional clinical handover in the emergency department: tools to improve patient safety
Investigators: Botti, M; Bucknall, T; Johnstone, MJ; McNess, A.
Funding body: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University
Funded period: 2009
Lay summary: An examination was made of the communication processes that occur when a critically ill patient is moved from a critical care area in the emergency department to a less acute care area for general care. The study findings are being used for organizational change management processes to facilitate the participation and skill development of clinicians
within the emergency department.

Project: Evaluation of advanced practice emergency nursing roles
Investigators: Considine J, Martin R, Kropman M, Stergiou H, Chiu H.
Funding body: Victorian Department of Health
Funded period: 2009
Lay summary: Advanced practice nursing roles such as emergency department fast-track and Clinical Initiatives Nurse (CIN) have been used in many organisations as a measure to manage increased emergency department demand. The aim of this project was to evaluate the outcomes of educational preparation in advanced clinical skills for emergency nurses and to determine if these roles are meeting the needs of patients, families, emergency department staff, and organisational objectives.

Project: Clinical nurse handover: informing decision making in patient care
Investigators: Bucknall, T; Legg, S; Forbes, H.
Funding body: Cabrini Health (Cabrini Institute)
Funded period: 2008-2009
Lay summary: The current project explored the cognitive activity or clinical decisions of registered nurses associated with sourcing and using information following clinical nurse handover. The purpose of this naturalistic research project was to analyse the decision making of clinical nurses following nursing handover to uncover the knowledge and cognitive processes used to complete safe competent care for Cabrini patients. The results demonstrated that handovers were ritualistic and descriptive, and variations were evident between nursing specialities and expertise. Health assessment following handover resulted in comprehensive care planning and higher levels of problem solving.

Project: Responding to medical emergencies: system characteristics under examination (RESCUE) - retrospective chart audit
Investigators: Bucknall, T; Ruseckaite, R; Barrett, E; Levinson, M.
Funding body: Cabrini Health (Cabrini Institute)
Funded period: 2009
Lay summary: This project examined inpatient MET call data at Cabrini Malvern to identify MET call activation criteria and factors impacting on patient outcomes following MET calls.

Project: The effect of supplemental Arginine on the healing of pressure ulcers
Investigators: Crowe, T; Pearce, L; Desneves, K.
Funding body: Eirene Lucas Foundation
Funded period: 2008-2009
Lay summary: Pressure ulcers, also known as bedsores, are serious medical complications of long-term immobility, such as occurs in spinal cord injured patients. Nutrition plays an important role in the healing of pressure ulcers. This study investigated the role of a specialised medical nutrition supplement and its effect on the rate of healing of pressure ulcers and showed a clinically significant two-fold improvement in the healing rate of ulcers.

Project: Incidence of occupational violence and aggression (OVA) across Southern Health and the use of restraint in response to OVA
Investigators: O'Connell, B; Hawkins, M; Doherty, A; Munro, B; Miller, P;
Funding body: Department of Human Services (Victoria) and Southern Health
Funded period: 2009
Lay summary: Various sources of data pertaining to OVA and restraint use at Southern Health have been examined, specifically focused on clinical areas with heightened risk of exposure to aggressive behaviours. Such incidents are clearly under-reported via official channels and new strategies need to be developed to minimise exposure and improve reporting.

Project: Evaluation of the latrobe regional health mental health triage service
Investigators: Sands, N. Elsom, S; Gerdtz, M.
Funding body: Latrobe Regional Health Service
Funded period: 2008-2009
Lay summary: The aim of this evaluation was to investigate Latrobe Regional HMHS mental health triage service provision with the aim of identifying the accessibility, timeliness, responsiveness, consistency, accountability and quality of the current model of service delivery. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify key areas for service improvement.

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

1st March 2012