Newsroom

Opportunities still exist in US news system disrupted by technology argues visiting

23 July, 2013

Predictions about the death of journalism brought about by the moves to online publishing reflect a lack of understanding about the role of journalism in society and the nature of news consumers, a visiting journalism expert will argue at a public lecture in Melbourne this Friday, July 26.

Professor Stephen Lacy, who is visiting Melbourne as part of Deakin University’s Thinker in Residence program, is an internationally recognised scholar in news economics, who has spent more than 30 years studying journalism. He works in the School of Journalism at Michigan State University, USA.

His public lecture will explore the reaction of US news organisations to digital transition and some of the future trends in the production and distribution of journalism.

“As a starting point, my observations about digital journalism are based on two fundamental propositions, first, journalism is essential to communities; second, demand determines how technology will be used and the news content that will be supplied,” he said.

“The disruption caused by digital distribution has caused experimentation within the US news industry, and my lecture will discuss some of these efforts to adjust to the disruption.

“To succeed, these experiments need to reflect the following realities of journalism markets:

• A significant proportion of US citizens are interested in news and opinion about governments

• People will pay for what they value – newsrooms must produce quality and serve communities

• The key to success is newsroom investment and how that investment is used

• Some communities will develop nonprofit news organisations that will enrich their journalism environment

• There will be much easier entry and exit to journalism markets

• Successful “business models” will vary from community to community

• News organisations will need to rethink the process by which they sell advertising

• Newsrooms will have to produce multiple products in multiple distribution systems. Mobile will play an increasing role

• Profit margins will be lower and more news organizations will be in the hands of private companies

• These could be exciting times for journalists—if they embrace technology and stand fast to the highest standards.

Lecture details:
Venue: The State Library of Victoria, Village Roadshow Theatrette, 328, Swanston Street, Melbourne
Time: 6pm, Friday, 26 July 2013
Registration for the lecture is essential. Register here:
Further information: contact Dr Usha M Rodrigues: usha.rodrigues@deakin.edu.au

News facts
  • Disruption caused by digital distribution has caused experimentation within the US news industry
  • Experiments need to reflect the following realities of journalism markets
  • Lecture will explore the reaction of US news organisations to digital transition and some of the future trends in the production and distribution of journalism

Media contact

Sandra Kingston
Deakin Media Relations
03 9246 8221 / 0422 005 485
sandra.kingston@deakin.edu.au

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23rd July 2013