Research Services Division

Deakin Research

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do I demonstrate national significance for a conference?
  2. How do I demonstrate peer review?
  3. How do I determine if a book is a textbook?
  4. For books and book chapters how do I determine if a publisher is a commercial publisher?

1. How do I demonstrate national significance for a conference?

  1. If three states in Australia and one overseas country is represented at a conference then this demonstrates national significance. Thus if you photocopy the first page from several other papers from the conference proceedings that show this, then this will demonstrate national significance. Often the table of contents only lists the title of papers and the author names without showing where the person came from; OR
  2. The conference is held in a different state each year.; OR
  3. The organising committee has broad representation from different states.

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2. How do I demonstrate peer review?

The easiest way is to look it up on ISI or Ulrich's. There is a link from our web page. If a journal is listed on ISI then it is peer reviewed. Ulrich's lists both refereed and unrefereed journals so you need to examine the listing for either the refereed symbol or a line that states "refereed YES". Please print this page and attach it to the publication as it saves us looking it up again when we do the audit. Other acceptable proof is a statement in the journal, the actual referees reports, a statement form the editor or a listing on DEST's register of refereed journals (see their web site). Remember that the whole of the conference paper needs to be peer reviewed. Thus a conference paper where only the abstract is peer reviewed cannot be entered in the E1 category.

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3. How do I determine if a book is a textbook?

(Excludes books from the A1 category and book chapters from the B1 category)

If a book has questions and answers, review questions or a section on what the student should remember after reading this chapter then it is a textbook. Also the introduction and preface give a guide. If the book's primary audience is undergraduate students then it is a textbook.

Clarification from DEST regarding textbooks:

We consider a book to be a "textbook" if it is specifically targeted to students. This would usually be identified in the introduction/preface where it would state something like "This book is intended to assist students in ..." If this continues with "and may be useful to academics and scholars" we would still consider it a textbook because its target audience is still students. In cases of obscure references to students, such as "this book may be useful to students" you would have to look further to determine if students are the main target or just one of many. We would expect most books to have a statement in the introduction that either directly points to the target audience or when explaining the aim of the book suggests towards the target audience.

One of the basic principles for a book to be eligible to be counted is that it must be commercially available and subject to the scrutiny of peers of the author. We do not deny that many, if not all, textbooks contain critically, scholarly research but a book intended solely for students does not fall into the scope of the collection.

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4. For books and book chapters how do I determine if a publisher is a commercial publisher?

Look it up on the list of commercial publishers on the DEST website. If it is not on this list and you believe it to be a commercial publisher then contact the Research Services Division.

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17th March 2011