Centre for Intelligent Systems Research

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IEEE SMC Victorian Chapter - Lecture - Dr. Kim Hua Tan

Date: Monday 20 October 2014
Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Room na 1.418, GTP Building (Ground Floor), Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Australia
Speaker: Dr. Kim Hua Tan, Reader in Lean Operations and Supply Management, Nottingham University Business School, England

  • Title: Harvesting Big Data to Enhance Supply Chain Innovation Competence Set
  • Biography: 

    Dr. Kim Hua Tan is a Reader in Lean Operations and Supply Management at Nottingham University Business School. Prior to this, he was a researcher and teaching assistant at Centre for Strategy and Performance, University of Cambridge. Dr. Tan spent many years in industry, holding various executive positions before joining academia in 1999. His current research interests are lean management, operations strategy, big data, food supply chain risk management, and sustainable manufacturing. Dr. Tan has published a book called 'Winning Decisions: Translating Business Strategy into Action Plans,' and numerous articles in academic journals such as Decision Sciences, International Journal of Production Economics, International Journal of Innovation Management, and others.

  • Abstract: 

    Today, firms can access to big data (videos, tweets, and other unstructured sources) to extract new ideas or understanding about their products, customers, and markets. Thus, managers increasingly view data as an important driver of innovation and a significant source of value creation and competitive advantage. To get the most out of the big data (in combination with a firm's existing data), a more sophisticated way of handling, managing, analysing and interpreting data is necessary. However, there is a lack of data analytics techniques to assist firms to capture the potential of innovation afforded by data and to gain competitive advantage. This research aims to address this gap by developing and testing an analytic infrastructure based on the deduction graph technique. The proposed approach provides an analytic infrastructure for firms to incorporate their own competence sets with other firms. Case studies results indicate that the proposed data analytic approach enable firms to utilise big data to gain competitive advantage by enhancing their supply chain innovation capabilities.

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Event Registration

For catering purposes, please register for the event here: IEEE SMC Event Registration Page

For more information on this event, please contact: Trish O'Toole
Email: trish.otool@deakin.edu.au, Phone: +61 3 5227 1352


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Centre for Intelligent Systems Research
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Deakin University
Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus
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Past Events


IEEE SMC Victorian Chapter - Lecture - Professor Xinghuo Yu

Date: Wednesday 1 October 2014
Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Room na 1.418, GTP Building (Ground Floor), Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Australia
Speaker: Professor Xinghuo Yu, IEEE Fellow, Director, RMIT Platform Technologies Research Institute

  • Title: Discontinuous Control Systems: Past, Present and Future
  • Biography: 

    Professor Xinghuo Yu is the Founding Director of RMIT Platform Technologies Research Institute. His research interests include variable structure and nonlinear control, complex and intelligent systems and industrial applications. He has published over 500 refereed papers in technical journals, books and conference proceedings. Professor Yu has served as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems - Part I, IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics, IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics and several other scholarly journals. He received a number of awards and honours for his achievements, including 2013 Dr.-Ing Eugene Mittelmann Achievement Award of IEEE Industrial Electronics Society and 2012 IEEE Industrial Electronics Magazine Best Paper Award. Professor Yu is a Fellow of the IEEE, Vice-President for Publications and an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE Industrial Electronics Society. He is also a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers, Australia, the Institution of Engineering and Technology (UK), the Australian Computer Society and the International Energy Foundation.

  • Abstract: 

    Discontinuous control is a most effective approach to deliver fast and efficient actions to achieve desirable control objectives. However its analysis and design present some of the most difficult mathematical challenges. Various schools of thought have been developed over the last several decades to address the analysis and design issues, yet, none of them can provide a satisfactory solution across the spectrum of discontinuity.

    In this talk, we will first introduce the basics of discontinuous control systems. We will then examine the major schools of thoughts in dealing with discontinuity and the analysis and design of this class of systems, exploring inherent properties that distinguish them from the continuous control systems and outlining critical issues that hinder their developments. Future perspectives in theory and applications will be discussed.

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IEEE SMC Victorian Chapter - Lecture - Professor Dan Koditschek

Date: Wednesday 23 July 2014
Time: 9:30 am - 10:30 am
Location: Room na 1.418, GTP Building (Ground Floor), Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Australia
Speaker: Professor Dan Koditschek, Alfred Fitler Moore Professor, Electrical & Systems Engineering, School of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Pennsylvania

  • Title: Composition of Attractor Basins for Dexterous Robotic Tasks
  • Biography: 

    Daniel E. Koditschek is the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Electrical and Systems Engineering. Dr. Koditschek received his bachelor's degree in Engineering and Applied Science and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1981 and 1983, all from Yale University. He served on the Yale Faculty in Electrical Engineering until moving to the University of Michigan a decade later. In January 2005, he moved to the University of Pennsylvania to assume the post of Chair of the Electrical and Systems Engineering Department, within the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

    Koditschek's research interests include robotics and, more generally, the application of dynamical systems theory to intelligent mechanisms. His archival journal and refereed conference publications, numbering well over 100, have appeared in a broad spectrum of venues ranging from the Transactions of the American Mathematical Society through The Journal of Experimental Biology, with a concentration in several of the IEEE journals and related transactions. Various aspects of this work have received mention in general scientific publications such as Scientific American and Science as well as in the popular and general lay press such as The New York Times and Discover Magazine. Dr. Koditschek is a member of the AMS, ACM, MAA, SIAM, SICB and Sigma Xi and is a Fellow of the IEEE and the AAAS.

    Koditschek holds secondary appointments within the School of Engineering and Applied Science in the departments of Computer and Information Science and Mechanical Engineering.

  • Abstract: 

    This talk reviews a two decade program of research in the design and implementation of modular controllers for dynamically dexterous robots. We seek to represent tasks by means of "templates:" low dimensional reference dynamics whose specified attractors encode goals and whose repelling boundaries represent obstacles or forbidden behaviors. General purpose machines typically have degrees of freedom unrelated to the needs of specific templates. Hence the most basic control module is an "anchor:" a feedback law that embeds the template as an attracting invariant submanifold in the machine's physical state space. Synthesis of more complicated behaviors from simpler constituents proceeds by sequential and parallel composition of templates. A correct synthesis is one for which the limit set of the anchored composition yields the desired composition of the template limit sets. After reviewing various instances of these ideas applied to the setting of steady state legged locomotion, the talk concludes with a preliminary look at the problem of encoding and implementing transitional tasks such as leaping across gaps and onto ledges.

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IEEE SMC Victorian Chapter - Lecture - Professor Toshio Fukuda

Date: Friday 18 July 2014
Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Room na 1.418, GTP Building (Ground Floor), Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Australia
Speaker: Professor Toshio Fukuda, Honorary Professor (Deakin University), Beijin Institute of Technology, Nagoya University, Meijo University

  • Title: Multi-scale Robotics
  • Biography: 

    Toshio Fukuda received the B.A. degree from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, in 1971, and the M.S and Dr. Eng. from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1973 and 1977, respectively.

    In 1977, he joined the National Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. In 1982, he joined the Science University of Tokyo, Japan, and then joined Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan, in 1989. He was Director of Center for Micro-Nano Mechatronics and Professor of Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering at Nagoya University, where he was mainly involved in the research fields of intelligent robotic and mechatronic system, cellular robotic system, and micro- and nano-robotic system. He was the Russell Springer Chaired Professor at UC Berkeley, Distinguished Professor, Seoul National University, and many other universities. Currently, He is Professor Emeritus Nagoya University, Visiting Professor Institute for Advanced Research Nagoya University, Professor Meijo University, Professor Beijin Institute of Technology.

    Dr. Fukuda is IEEE Region 10 Director (2013-2014) and served President of IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (1998-1999), Director of the IEEE Division X, Systems and Control (2001- 2002), and Editor-in-Chief of IEEE / ASME Transactions on Mechatronics (2000-2002). He was President of IEEE Nanotechnology Council (2002-2003, 2005) and President of SOFT (Japan Society for Fuzzy Theory and Intelligent Informatics) (2003-2005). He was elected as a member of Science Council of Japan (2008-). He received the IEEE Eugene Mittelmann Award (1997), IEEE Millennium Medal (2000), Humboldt Research Prize (2002), IEEE Robotics and Automation Pioneer Award (2004), IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Distinguished Service Award (2005), Award from Ministry of Education and Science in Japan (2005). IEEE Nanotechnology Council Distinguished service award (2007). Best Googol Application paper awards from IEEE Trans. Automation Science and Engineering (2007). Best papers awards from RSJ (2004) and SICE (2007), Special Funai Award from JSME (2008), 2009 George Saridis Leadership Award in Robotics and Automation (2009), IEEE Robotics and Automation Technical Field Award (2010), ROBOMECH Award 2010 (2010), The Society of Instrument and Control Engineers Technical Field Award (2010), IROS Harashima Award for Innovative Technologies (2011), Friendship Award of Liaoning Province PR China (2012), Distinguished Service Award, The Robotics Society of Japan (2010), World Automation Congress 2010 (WAC 2010) dedicated to Prof. Toshio Fukuda, Best Paper Award in 2010 International Symposium on Micro-Nano Mechatronics and Human Science (MHS2010), IEEE Fellow (1995), SICE Fellow (1995), JSME Fellow (2001), RSJ Fellow (2004), Honorary Doctor of Aalto University School of Science and Technology (2010).

  • Abstract: 

    This talk is an overview of the Multi-scale robotics, based on the Cellular Robotics System, which is the basic concept of the emergence of intelligence in a multi-scale way from Cell Level to the Organizational Level. It consists how the system can be structured from the individual to the group/society levels in analogy with the biological system. It covers a wide range of challenging topics:

    1. Individual robot level, Brachiation Robots and Multi-locomotion robots, medical robotics and simulator
    2. Cooperation and competition of the multiple robotics system
    3. Distributed autonomous robotic system
    4. Micro and nano robotics system
    5. Bio analysis and synthesis: bio-robotics system

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IEEE SMC Victorian Chapter - Tutorial - Dr Abbas Khosravi

Date: Monday 9 June 2014
Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Australia
Speaker: Dr Abbas Khosravi, Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University

  • Title: Optimal design of type reduction algorithms for interval type-2 fuzzy logic systems
  • Biography: 

    Abbas Khosravi received the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 2002, the M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, in 2005, and the Ph.D. degree from Deakin University, Australia, in 2010. Dr Khosravi is currently with the Centre for Intelligent Systems Research (CISR), Deakin University, Australia. He has authored/co-authored more than 80 publications in international journals and conference proceedings. His current research interests include computational intelligence and soft computing techniques and their application in various engineering problem domains. Dr Khosravi was the recipient of the Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in 2011.

  • Abstract: 

    Recent literature shows that interval type-2 fuzzy logic systems "IT2FLSs" possess an excellent approximation capability even better than traditional nonparametric methods such as neural networks "NNs". Type reduction "TR" is one of the key components of IT2FLSs with a huge impact on their performance. This research aims to comprehensively investigate and quantify effects of TR algorithms on the quality of forecasts generated by IT2FLS models. It also proposes a new nonparametric nonlinear TR algorithm that optimally generates the defuzzified model output directly from the firing strengths and consequent lower and upper values of each rule. The NN type reducer is trained through minimization of an error-based cost function using evolutionary optimization algorithms. Once the optimal NN-based type reducer is trained, IT2FLS models can be easily used in prediction and classification problems. Numerical testing using real datasets indicate IT2FLS models equipped with the new optimal TR algorithm outperform IT2FLS models using traditional TR algorithms in terms of forecast accuracy and consistency. This benefit is achieved in no cost, as the computational requirement of the proposed optimal TR algorithm is the same as traditional TR algorithms.

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IEEE SMC Victorian Chapter - Inaugural Lecture

Date: Monday 7 April 2014
Time: 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: Room na 1.418, GTP Building (Ground Floor), Centre for Intelligent Systems Research, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Australia

5:00 - 5:05 pm - Opening and Welcome - Professor Saeid Nahavandi
5:05 - 5:10 pm - Anthony Gascoigne - Chair, IEEE Victorian Section
5:10 - 5:50 pm - Lecture - Professor Laslo T. Koczy - Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

  • Title: Fuzzy Signatures
  • Biography: 

    Professor and President of the University Research Council, Szechenyi Istvan University (SZE, Gyor) and Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME) Hungary

    Laszlo Koczy received the M.Sc., M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees from the Technical University of Budapest (BME) in 1975, 1976 and 1977, respectively; and the (postdoctoral) D.Sc. degree from the Hungarian Academy of Science, all in Electrical/Control Engineering. He spent most of his career at BME until 2001 and from 2002 at SZE. However, he has been a visiting professor at various universities abroad, namely in Australia (ANU, Murdoch and UNSW), Japan (TIT), Korea (POSTECH), Austria (J. Kepler U.), Italy (U. of Trento) and Brazil, China, Finland and Poland for summer schools. He was one of the LIFE Endowed Fuzzy Theory Chair Professors at Tokyo Institute of Technology and advisor to the Laboratory for International Fuzzy Engineering Research in Yokohama. His focus of research interest is fuzzy systems and Computational Intelligence topics (evolutionary algorithms, neural networks), as well as applications. He has published over 370 refereed papers and several textbooks on the subject. He introduced the concept of rule interpolation in sparse fuzzy models, and applied it successfully to the control of an automatic guided vehicle; further hierarchical interpolative fuzzy systems and fuzzy Hough transform. This latter provided the key technology in the winning vehicle in the 2007 Hungarian Mars Rover Competition. His research interests include applications of CI for telecommunication, transportation, vehicles and mobile robots, control, information retrieval, etc.

    Among others he had been an Associate Editor of IEEE TFS and he is an Associate Editor of Fuzzy Sets and Systems, Int. J. of Fuzzy Systems, J. of Advanced Computational Intelligence, Mathware and Soft Computing, etc.

    He was the General Chair of FUZZ-IEEE 2004 in Budapest, and a number of other conferences, co-chair, PC member, etc. at many other scientific events. He served in the International Fuzzy Systems Association as President, and is now Administrative Committee member of IEEE Computational Intelligence Society.

    At SZE he serves his second term as Dean of Engineering, he chairs the Ph.D. School Council and is one of the sponsors of the Szechenyi Alternative Fuel Engine Vehicles Competition, the National Conference of Mechanical Engineering Students, etc.

  • Abstract: 

    Fuzzy signatures (FS) are complex structured uncertain descriptors which are suitable for manipulations even when their respective actual structures are not entirely identical. This presentation will give an introduction to the definitions and basic operations in connection with FS.

    In many engineering problems there is a series of features which may be grouped into subsets with components related closer to each other, even to sub-subsets within these subsets. Such structures may be represented by either a tree graph, or an iteratively nested vector (with sub-vectors as components).

    A very special extension of the idea of FS is given by the Fuzzy Situational Maps (FSM) where the sub-trees represent matrices of two or more dimensions with more or less fixed spatial structure. Zoom in and zoom out operations combined with proper fuzzy aggregations help to increase or decrease the detail view of a given part of the area described by the FSM.

    A series of possible applications of FSM will be presented such as description of condition of residential buildings, warehouse layouts and scenarios for intelligent collaborating robots.

5:50 - 6:30 pm - Lecture - Professor Bill Moran - Defence Science Institute, University of Melbourne

  • Title: The Ubiquitous Sensor
  • Biography: 

    Professor Bill Moran, from the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, has been appointed as Director of the Defence Science Institute (DSI), a joint venture between the University of Melbourne and the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO).

    Professor Moran is an expert in radar technology, coding and information theory, waveform adaptive sensing, information geometry and compressive sensing, high resolution radar for environmental monitoring, scalable robust video surveillance over constrained networks, mathematics of distributed radar, radar on a chip (ROACH), detection and tracking of targets using distributed antenna, sonar simulation modelling, rapid prototyping, and sensor networks.

    Professor Moran is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (FAA), a Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and a Member of the London, Australian and American Mathematical Societies.

  • Abstract: 

    Sensors are becoming an increasingly important part of our society. Cameras, radars, IR sensors, microphones, are everywhere. If correctly used in disaster management contexts such as bushfires they would be able to assist in deployment of first responders and evacuation of residents.

    The aim of this talk is to discuss the theory of sensing, mostly in fairly general terms but with examples taken from disaster management and defence. One aspect of sensing that is being considered in the research community is adaptivity. Sensors can change in many ways: cameras can move, change focal length, change aperture. Radars can change their illumination pattern.

    How can we better use this adaptive aspect of sensors to extract the most information from a scene? What is information anyway? And how much does it cost to collect? How can we automate the adaptivity of sensing to optimize the results.

6:30 - 7:00 pm - Wrap-up and Light Refreshments

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6th October 2014