Electromaterials and membranes

Electromaterials research at IFM aims to develop new energy technologies through the creation of new electroactive materials.

Challenges in the areas of energy generation and storage mainly relate to safety, energy and cost. We are investigating new device chemistries, such as metal-air or sodium-based batteries and also trying to improve the performance of existing technologies such as lithium-ion batteries.

The development of nanoporous membrane materials is helping to address future biomedical and environmental challenges.

Our Research

Energy generation – thermocells

To meet the demand for higher-performance battery technologies, considerable research effort is directed at lithium metal, sodium-ion and metal-air batteries.

Our approach is to optimise ionic liquids and organic ionic plastic crystals to replace currently used flammable electrolytes for these devices and thus address safety issues.

Energy storage – advanced metal batteries

To meet the demand for higher-performance battery technologies, considerable research effort is directed at lithium metal, sodium-ion and metal-air batteries.

Our approach is to optimise ionic liquids and organic ionic plastic crystals to replace currently used flammable electrolytes for these devices and thus address safety issues.

Membranes

Nanoporous membrane materials offer advanced opportunities for finely sorting matter at the nanoscale. Our researchers are working on membrane fabrication and characterisation by developing membranes with aligned pores, with diameters below 5 nm, to replicate the performance in terms of liquid permeation of existing materials.

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