Deakin Research

Institute for Frontier Materials

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Polymer heavyweights to hit Geelong

Deakin is set to host the 14th International Symposium on Polymer Electrolytes in Geelong.

Funding success for electromaterials researchers

Deakin to be part of a cutting edge new ARC Centre of Excellence.

Our Research

Electrochemical Workstation
The aim of our research is to develop new materials and understanding to support the development and integration of new energy technologies with improved safety, efficiency and durability.

Our research groups have combined expertise in:

  • Synthesis, development and optimisation of electrodes and electrolytes for metal / air, sodium and lithium batteries.
  • Incorporation of nanostructures and new fibres for the development of high capacity electrodes.
  • Advanced electrochemical characterisation techniques to understand the material and chemical properties of electrochemical devices, electroactive surfaces and interfaces.
  • Manipulation of reactive metal surfaces using novel chemical approaches for the control of electrochemical processes.
  • Computational modelling and simulations of structure and transport in liquid and solid ionic electrolytes and mixtures.
  • Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance expertise and facilities, including in-situ characterisation for electrochemical devices, solid-state and diffusion NMR.

We are currently focusing our expertise on projects in the following areas:

  • The design and characterisation of new electromaterials with enhanced performance, safety and reduced costs for the development of new battery chemistries.
  • Development of characterisation techniques to probe the fundamental chemical and electrochemical mechanisms in a variety of novel battery technologies.
  • Understanding and control of reactive metal surface / electrolyte interactions of relevance to electrochemical devices and corrosion processes.
  • Fundamental understanding of ionic structure and transport mechanisms in ion transport materials using advanced modelling and characterisation techniques.
  • The development of redox active electrolytes and electrocatalytic electrodes for thermal energy harvesting.

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

23rd January 2014