Deakin Research

Institute for Frontier Materials

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Melting and casting facility

IFM's metals research group has exceptional capabilities in the melting and casting of both ferrous and non-ferrous alloy systems. Our facilities include various casting options as well as fully instrumented strip casting simulation equipment. Our casting facility is run by an experience foundry operator supported by IFM central funding as well as individual research grants.

Ferrous casting facilities

Dura-Line steel casting induction furnace (25 kg)

SpectromaxThe Dura-Line coreless induction furnace has a body constructed of heavy cast refractory, with stainless steel reinforcement. This furnace is tuned for melting ferrous alloys. The furnace is digitally controlled and signal processing is carried out by fibre-optic connectors.

  • Induction melting furnace, tuned for ferrous alloys
  • Up to 25kg capacity
  • Max. temperature > 1650°C
  • Alumina reftractory lining
  • Casting options include chill mould, sand mould or furnace cooling
  • Alloying elements: Al, Si, Cr, C, Cu, Mn, Zr, Ni, Mo, Co, V, N, P, Ti, S, Ca, B etc
  • Cover gas: Argon

 

Dura-Line steel casting induction furnace (100 kg)

SpectromaxThe Dura-Line coreless induction furnace has a body constructed of heavy cast refractory, with stainless steel reinforcement. This furnace is tuned for melting ferrous alloys. The furnace is digitally controlled and signal processing is carried out by fibre-optic connectors

  • Induction melting furnace, tuned for ferrous alloys
  • Up to 100kg capacity
  • Max. temperature > 1650°C
  • Alumina refractory lining
  • Casting options include chill mould, sand mould or simulated strip casting
  • Alloying elements: Al, Si, Cr, C, Cu, Mn, Zr, Ni, Mo, Co, V, N, P, Ti, S, Ca, B etc
  • Cover gas: Argon

 

Strip casting simulatorSpectromax

  • To simulate the rapid cooling experience during twin roll strip casting, we have a lab scale simulator designed to be used on the 100kg ferrous alloy induction furnace
  • The simulator is fully instrumented and can measure temperatures up to 1700°C at an aquisition rate > 10,000 measurements per second
  • Using the strip casting simulator, we can change casting gas, casting speed, liquid temperature, substrate temperature and substrate condition

Non-Ferrous casting facilities

Magnesium casting facility

  • Induction heated steel crucible
  • Capacity: up to 400 grams (~250mL)
  • Chill casting under argon
  • Temperature up to 800°C
  • Capable of casting most Mg alloys
  • Alloying elements: Gd, Y, Sn, Zn, Ce, Ca, Al, Ni, Sr, Li etc

Light Alloy casting facility

  • Can melt magnesium or aluminium alloys
  • Resistance heated furnace
  • Capacity: up to 2kg of magnesium (~1.2L)
  • Chill casting under cover gas
  • Temperature up to 1000°C

SPECTROMAXx with Spark Analyser MX Software

SpectromaxSPECTROMAXx (LMX05) stationary metal analyser is used to determine alloy composition in metallic systems. This is housed in our casting facility for testing composition of alloy melts before casting.

Specifications

  • Machine’s memory contains calibration data for Fe, Cu, Al, Mg, and Ti.
  • Wavelength range from 140-670nm
  • Light sensitive electronic detector (CCD technology), to convert light into electric charges.
  • Fe, Cu, Al, Mg, Ti and their alloys can be tested for purity and elemental composition.
  • Spark Analyser Software for analytical operation and calibration.

An image of the system control softwareSpectromax
An image of the temperature stepsSpark test
Sample sizeMX software
AtmosphereCalibration sample

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

28th July 2014