Deakin Research

Institute for Frontier Materials

Growing at pace

Tue, 23 Oct 2012 10:18:00 +1100

The Nanobiotechnology Research Centre based in New Delhi is growing at an exponential rate.
 
The centre - a collaboration between India’s The Energy Research Institute (TERI) and Deakin University - was formally inaugurated earlier this year by The Honourable Louise Asher, MP, the Victorian Minister for Innovation, Services and Small Business, Minister for Tourism and Major Events.
 
“As we approach the end of our first year we are where we thought we would be at the end of three years,” said Dr Alok Adholeya, the inaugural Director of the Centre.
 
“There is not month that goes by without some new research partner joining us and some new research project starting.”
 
Professor Peter Hodgson, the head of Deakin’s Institute for Frontier Materials and another of the driving forces behind the establishment of the centre, welcomed the news of the rapid growth when Dr Adholeya visited the University in October.
 
“Alok and his staff have done a great job in getting the message out there in India about the centre, what its goals and capabilities are,” Professor Hodgson said.
 
“TERI of course already has a great reputation in India for its great work in creating a sustainable future, particularly in the areas of health and food security.
 
“The speed at which the centre is growing is also a strong indication of the growing recognition in India of our research at Deakin in nano and biotechnology.”
 
The Nanobiotechnology Research Centre aims to help create a greener and a more advanced use of nanotechnology for resolving challenging agricultural and biomedical issues.
 
It recognises the need for 'green technology' that includes a clean, nontoxic, and environment-friendly method of nanoparticle synthesis. As an alternative to conventional methods, biological methods are considered safe and ecologically sound for the nanomaterial fabrication. In this regard, the use of micro-organisms such as bacteria and fungi in the biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles holds immense potential.
 
The centre has doctoral students and scientists with diverse expertise in the fields like:

  • sustainable agriculture
  • soil fertility
  • physical chemistry
  • soil microbiology
  • plant-microbe interactions
  • microbial bioremediation and phytoremediation
  • molecular microbiology
  • molecular biology for clinical applications.

Find out more about TERI.


The centre - a collaboration between India's The Energy Research Institute (TERI) and Deakin University - was formally inaugurated earlier this year by The Honourable Louise Asher, MP, the Victorian Minister for Innovation, Services and Small Busines
The centre - a collaboration between India's The Energy Research Institute (TERI) and Deakin University - was formally inaugurated earlier this year by The Honourable Louise Asher, MP, the Victorian Minister for Innovation, Services and Small Business, Minister for Tourism and Major Events.
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  • The speed at which the centre is growing is also a strong indication of the growing recognition in India of Deakin's research in nano and biotechnology.
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29th March 2011