Deakin Research

Institute for Frontier Materials

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Novel solar cells capture audience's imagination

IFM's Gayathri Devi Rajmohan has won the People's Prize in Deakin's Three Minute Thesis competition for 2013.

New world of plasma research

Meet the team at Deakin making it happen.

Plasma

An image showing a Researcher removing a thin TiO2 film from the advanced plasma facility to use for photovoltaic applications.
Plasma is present in lightning, auroras, fluorescent lamps and TVs. It is also an exciting new way of shaping materials for scientific and industrial applications.

Plasma is cool!

A new plasma laboratory for tailoring surfaces/interfaces and producing new materials has been opened within the Institute for Frontier Materials. The plasmas are not just cool, they are "cold" because the ones we use are non-equilibrium plasmas in which only the very light electrons are hot. This means that they do not damage delicate materials by heating.

Cool approach

The plasma team motto is: "different experts harmoniously working together".

The aim is to bring all the needed expertise together so that diverse problems can be approached from the best angle with the right skills. The expertise includes plasma physics and chemistry, materials science and engineering, biology, measurement and characterisation. We focus on gaining an improved understanding and on developing new plasma technology and methods to match the needs of each project. The projects currently being tackled range from improving the efficiency of solar cells and batteries, through biomaterials, food sterilisation, agriculture, sensors, nano-fabrication and light-weight composites to anti-pilling of wool knitwear, waste-water treatment and electronic textiles.

Cool customers

We provide a platform technology for collaborative research and solutions for industry. More than thirty PhD studies and collaborative projects have been undertaken and proposed. The new plasma laboratory is backed by the facilities and expertise of IFM and the collaborations also extend across the University and to outside organisations nationally and internationally.

The plasma team has extensive experience and a track record in solving challenges using an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms and of how to tailor the plasma to match the applications.

We work in partnership to understand and jointly solve problems. Different experts harmoniously working together is the key to meeting and solving new challenges.

Australian Physics 50(1), 2013: Plasma Research at Deakin University (PDF-1,238kb)

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

4th February 2014