Discovery Awards for 2002


Faculty of Arts

School of Australian and International Studies
School of Literary and Communication Studies
School of Social Inquiry

Faculty of Business and Law

School of Law
Deakin Business School

Faculty of Education

School of Scientific and Developmental Studies
School of Social and Cultural Studies

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

School of Health Sciences
School of Psychology

Faculty of Science and Technology

School of Architecture and Building
School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
School of Computing and Mathematics
School of Ecology and Environment
School of Engineering and Technology

 


Faculty of Arts

School of Australian and International Studies

Title:UNESCO - Agency of Cultural Globalisation? Analysis of the Conflict between Universal Values and Local Cultural Identity in the Asia-Pacific Region

Prof William Logan, Dr MR Askew, DR MC Langfield, DR J Sweet (APD), DR A Smith, Mr CD Long (APD)

2002: $91,776
2003: $94,450
2004: $94,450
2005: $94,450

Summary:Economic globalisation is accompanied by cultural globalisation. Whether to accept or attempt to resist this impact on local cultures is a critical issue for communities and governments throughout the Asia-Pacific region. This project will identify and evaluate those activities of UNESCO and its associated bodies, ICOMOS, ICOM and ICCROM, that tend to impose a common stamp on cultures across the world, as well as the local resistance to those activities. Four fields covering tangible and intangible culture will be investigated: heritage places, museums, folklife and heritage education. Outcomes include improved heritage management; outputs include a book and refereed journal articles.

School of Literary and Communication Studies

Title: Television, globalisation and social change in India

DR Sanjay Srivastava, Prof JG Sinclair, DR K Jain (APD)

2002: $70,000
2003: $82,000
2004: $94,337

Summary:Since the economic liberalisation beginning in the late 1980s and the introduction of direct broadcast satellite television in 1991, television in India has become a highly dynamic and self-reflexive agent for an increasingly 'globalised' sensibility. This study seeks to examine the process in which commercial, mass-mediated public culture has been generated. By engaging in an innovative and systematic approach which will integrate direct studies of audiences, program production, modes of commercialisation and the role of the state, the study will provide the basis for a definitive book on this key aspect of Indian media culture.


School of Social Inquiry

Title: Comparative dimensions of active citizenship: an analysis of indicators of inclusivity and exclusivity in civil society

DR Sue Kenny, DR KM Brown, A/Prof JA Onyx, Prof TW Burke

2002: $25,000
2003: $50,000
2004: $50,000
2005: $35,000

Summary: Active citizenship is a key concept in debates around the nature of civil society and the changing forms of citizenship. To date, grounded studies of the concept have been few. The project's significance lies in its focus on developing indicators of active citizenship. This enables the empirical charting of active citizenship. The comparative aspect to the project will heighten our ability to understand these processes in Australia in relation to other countries.

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Faculty of Business and Law

School of Law

Title: Electronic Health Records: Achieving an Effective and Ethical Legal and Recordkeeping Framework

DR Danuta Mendelson, Mrs L Iacovino, DR BM McSherry, Mrs MR Paterson

2002: $28,000
2003: $28,000
2004: $23,453

Summary: Health records are essential to efficacious treatment and affect every individual. They are 'socially critical' communications because the therapeutic relationship between doctor and patient is based on trust. Without any systematic ethical and legal safeguards or recordkeeping framework, the application of new technologies for networking health records lacks social credibility. This multidisciplinary study will provide a set of principles and standards relating to authenticity, ownership, access, privacy, and confidentiality of doctor-patient communications in a networked environment, which, if implements, will benefit patients and the medical community thus furthering the development of a more efficacious national health system.

 

Deakin Business School

Title: Modelling the Diffusion of Innovation in Marketing Research

Prof Robin Shaw

2002: $50,000

Summary: This project will identify and explain the utilisation of marketing research in Australian organisations. The major (but not exclusive) focus will be the diffusion of Internet-based marketing research innovations. Previous studies of marketing research have been limited, through focussing on only one sector (such as tourism) or aspect of usage, or by using small samples, or by excluding important Internet innovations or managerial evaluations. This project will investigate the diffusion of marketing research across many industrial sectors, over several years. The project will yield "benchmarking" benefits of immediate value, and enduring benefits through the continuing evaluation of innovative research practices.

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Faculty of Education

School of Scientific and Developmental Studies

Title: Young women negotiating from the margins of education and work: towards gender justice in educational and youth policies and programs

DR Julie Mcleod, DR JE Kenway, Prof AG Mackinnon, DR A Allard

2002: $40,000
2003: $60,000
2004: $35,000

Summary:Young women who leave school early are the most economically disadvantaged young people in the labour market. We will investigate the educational, labour market, biographical and social experiences of these young women, and their interactions with teachers and youth service providers. We will identify trends, differences and similarities across rural and urban locations and across generations, and develop a profile of factors and programs most likely to help these young women negotiate their post-school lives. The research findings will enrich gender justice and social theory and contribute to policy and program development in the education and youth services sectors.



School of Social and Cultural Studies

Title: An investigation of the declining supply of school principals in Australia

A/Prof Jill Blackmore, Prof JM Sachs, Ms P Thomson

2002: $25,000
2003: $40,000
2004: $40,000

Summary: Leadership is critical when reforming schools for new knowledge economies. Yet international and Australian anecdotal evidence suggests a declining supply of applicants for school leadership. This study investigates the existence, extent and nature of, and explanations for, this paradox across three states and all education systems against international trends. Its unique contribution lies in its focus on (i) interactions between institutional structures, cultures and professional identity, (ii) context and location, (iii) the interplay of gender, race and ethnic difference. Innovative research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, will produce evidence to inform policy development on principal recruitment, selection, induction and professional development.


Title: Teachers Investigate Unequal Literary Outcomes: Cross Generational Perspectives
(Grant Administered by University of South Australia)

Dr Barbara Comber, A/Prof BR Kamler

2002: $30,000
2003: $50,000
2004: $50,000

Summary:Unequal outcomes in literacy remains the most intractable problem facing our educational community. This research will investigate both historical and contemporary literacy practice in terms of its differential effects on primary school children. It recognises the teacher as the most significant factor in improving student outcomes and builds teacher researcher communities to document teaching that makes a difference for 'at risk' children. Its unique cross generational methodology will make overt links between one generation of teachers and the next and produce new knowledge about literacy and disadvantage. Practical applications for teacher education and professional mentoring across generations will be developed.

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Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

School of Health Sciences

Title: Examination of consumers' and food industry's use and views of plant-based food products

DR Anthony Worsley, DR DA Crawford, Ms E Lea (APD)

2002: $65,184
2003: $65,184
2004: $65,184

Summary: Plant food products such as cereal grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes can provide physiological benefits for consumers, value-adding opportunities for industry, and, ecological sustainability. This project will examine the factors driving consumer interest in this area and gauge the extent of industry and mass media influences over consumer demand.

Major outcomes of the project include greater understanding of consumer use of these foods, segmentation of the consumer market, novel segmentation instruments, a stronger basis for communication between industry and consumers regarding plant foods, and identification of opportunities and barriers to the production and marketing of novel plant food products.


School of Psychology

Title: The language abilities of young offenders: Missing links in theory and practice

DR Pamela Snow, DR MB Powell

2002: $28,000
2003: $25,000
2004: $25,000

Summary:Young offenders are a complex and challenging population, with high rates of comorbidity between attentional, learning, and behaviour problems. Few workers have, however, considered the underlying language processing and production skills in this population. Available evidence indicates a high level of vulnerability to language disorders in young offenders. These may contribute to poor academic performance and failure to develop prosocial skills. This study will explore language competencies and will describe their relationship to social skills, patterns of comorbidity, and type of offence (property Vs violent). Findings will be relevant to theories of juvenile offending and design of prevention/intervention programs.

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Faculty of Science and Technology

School of Architecture and Building

Title: Modelling greenhouse gas emissions associated with commercial building construction

DR Graham Treloar, DR BD Ilozor

2002: $33,000
2003: $35,000
2004: $35,000

Summary: A reliable model of greenhouse gas emissions for commercial building construction is required. Construction product manufacturing emissions are will known, but those associated with the construction process (representing up to 25% of the energy embodied in construction products) have not been fully elucidated. Commercial building construction requires more energy per square metre than residential building construction, due mainly to lifting of heavy items. The results will be used to develop cost effective strategies for optimising greenhouse gas emissions associated with the total emissions from commercial building construction and operation. This will improve the environmental performance of the Australian construction industry.

School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

Title: The Molecular Basis of Copper Metabolism in Sheep

Prof J Mercer, DR S La Fontaine

2002: $64,000
2003: $57,000
2004: $59,000

Summary: The unusual copper metabolism of sheep represents a significant agricultural problem. They are very susceptible to copper deficiency, but readily accumulate copper to toxic levels in the liver leading to fatal liver failure. We propose to elucidate the reason for the copper accumulation phenotype of sheep. We are focusing on WND, a copper transporter responsible for copper excretion into bile. We discovered a novel form of sheep WND designated WNDb to distinguish it from the normal form, WNDa. The experiments outlined are designed to understand the function of both proteins in the sheep and their role in copper sequestration.


School of Computing and Mathematics

Title: Job Scheduling Strategies for General-Purpose High-Performance Computing Clusters

DR Bing Bing Zhou, Prof AM Goscinski, Prof R Brent

2002: $60,988
2003: $63,162
2004: $65,336

Summary: High-performance computing is moving away from specialised platforms to cheaper clusters and it is expected that clusters will become the mainstream computing platforms for general-purpose applications. One major problem that hinders the application of clusters is the lack of effective scheduling facilities to efficiently allocate system resources to meet the performance requirements of various applications. We shall design a new and innovative job scheduling system to solve this problem. The emphasis will be on practical designs in the context of real operating systems. The successful completion of this research will greatly promote a wide application of clusters.


School of Ecology and Environment

Title: Measuring estuarine turbulence: opening blocked estuaries correctly to avoid ecological catastrophes

DR Michael Coates, DR J Sharples

2002: $53,000
2003: $52,000
2004: $54,000

Summary: The unique estuaries of southern Australia have limited tidal effects and minimal summer river flows, allowing a sandbar to dam their mouths during this period. The high water levels that can result affect landowners so catchment managers artificially break these sandbars. Such practices have had catastrophic effects on the vulnerable estuarine ecosystems. Our project will provide critical elements of models of the dynamics of the artificial opening, allowing managers to predict the vulnerable periods. It combines new applications of state-of-the-art turbulence sensors and water-current profilers with other standard instrumentation in this situation.


School of Engineering and Technology

Title: Development of ultrafine Grained Steels

Prof Peter Hodgson

2002: $87,000
2003: $98,000
2004: $88,000

Summary:This project will develop new methods to produce steels with much finer microstructures, and investigate how these microstructures form. This will markedly increase the strength and toughness of these steels, which is particularly required for the pipeline, off shore platform and large construction industries. The method to be used involves controlling the hot deformation of the steel and control of the phase transformation during or after deformation. Current work has shown that it is possible to reduce the grain size from 5 to 1 microns using quite simple methods.


Title: Modelling and minimising energy consumption in ring spinning

Prof Xungai Wang, DR WB Fraser

2002: $30,000
2003: $56,000
2004: $56,000

Summary:Australia's 4 billion dollar natural fibre production is spun into yarns via ring spinning mainly. A major drawback of this spinning system is its high energy consumption. This project will examine, theoretically and experimentally, the key factors contributing to energy consumption in ring spinning. It will generate new knowledge on the relationship between yarn hairiness and the air drag on a rapidly rotating yarn package and on a ballooning yarn, and predict how this air drag affects the energy consumption during package build-up in ring spinning. This will lead to ways of minimising energy consumption in this most important spinning process.

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Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

1st December 2009