ARC Linkage Awards for 2002

Faculty of Arts

School of Australian and International Studies
School of Social Inquiry

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Science

School of Nursing
School of Psychology

Faculty of Science and Technology

School of Architecture and Building
School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
School of Ecology and Environment
School of Engineering and Technology

 


Faculty of Arts

School of Australian and International Studies

Title: Cultural Heritage Site Significance, Management and Interpretation in China and Australia: A Comparative Analysis in a Cross-Cultural Framework

Prof William Stewart Logan, Mr JD Sweet, Ms KF Altenburg, Adj/Prof SM Sullivan

2002: $39,861
2003: $37,801
2004: $40,996

Industry Partner(s):
Sullivan Blazejowski & Associates, Cultural Heritage Conservation
Australian Heritage Commission/Dept of the Environment & Heritage

Summary: The Nara Document 1994 asserts that East Asians see 'cultural heritage' differently from Westerners and that conservation practice should reflect the culture in which it takes place. Given Australia's growing tourism links with China, and China's growing importance in the Asia-Pacific, it is timely to reflect on the Chinese understanding of cultural heritage. Conversely China's relatively new cultural heritage industry can learn from Australian practice. This project aims at better mutual understanding by researching key issues of site significance, management and interpretation. The research will fill a gap in the literature and provide model for further cross-cultural heritage analysis.


Title: Economic and social rights of asylum seekers in Australia: Challenges for Community Associations

Dr Fethi Mansouri, Dr SM Kenny, Dr KM Brown, Ms DE Smiley

2002: $25,000
2003: $25,000
2004: $25,000

Industry Partner(s): Victorian Arabic Social Service (VASS)

Summary: This project will investigate the contribution of a community association providing humanitarian assistance to newly-arrived refugees holding Temporary Protection Visas (TPV). The project will assess the capacity of non-government organizations (NGOs) in delivering basic social services and identifying areas of immediate concern. The anticipated outcomes of the project are: (a) the establishment of effective models of best practice in the delivery of social services by a NGO, (b) the potential for partnership between such an organization and the State in developing social policy, and (c) the contribution to theoretical examination of the role of civil society in the new Globalisation era.


Title: Negotiating Transitions to Retirement

Dr Linda Hancock, Ms V Sheen

2002: $20,000
2003: $20,000

Industry Partner(s): Council on the Aging (Australia)

Summary: This project will track diverse pathways in work/retirement transitions, by analysing how the present policy accommodates shifts in labour markets, demographic shifts and shifts in households and income distributions. Focused on cohorts aged 45 to 64, it firstly analyses national data sets to track the impact of the current policy mix in terms of income security, industrial relations, housing, health, education and training and work/life. Secondly, it Draws on qualitative data to further examine how these transitions are played out. The research will develop a new policy matrix for older workers that addresses risk, social exclusion and social protection.

School of Social Inquiry


Title: New Trends in Foundation Formation

Dr Sue Kenny, Dr KM Brown, Ms E Cham

2002: $20,000
2003: $20,000

Industry Partner(s): Philanthropy Australia

Summary: The encouragement of philanthropic giving is a current priority of governments globally. The creation of foundations is one strategy for expanding philanthropic activity, with profound implications for public policy and existing foundations. Working with Philanthropy Australia, this study will explore the concept of charitable foundations and recent trends in foundation formation such as the development of 'community owned' enterprises and pressures on business to become more 'socially responsible'. The study will produce data of vital importance to informed policy making and to the effectiveness of philanthropic foundations.


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Faculty of Health and Behavioral Science

School of Nursing

Title: Investigating consumer partnerships in the context of complex health service delivery

Dr Sally Jane Wellard, Dr C Beanland, Ms ME Lewis

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s):
Box Hill Hospital
Cabrini Hospital

Summary: Whilst increased consumer participation has been demonstrated to improve health outcomes, there has been no translation to people with chronic illness using acute care services. People with chronic conditions represent an increasing proportion of health care consumers and due to the existence of co-morbidities their needs are usually complex. Despite this, they have been marginalised in the current development of participatory models of service delivery. This project will investigate the determinants of participation for consumers during episodes of acute health care, identify barriers to their participation, and develop testable strategies for increasing effective consumer participation in acute health care services.


School of Psychology

Title: Development of an intervention to enhance rural and regional service delivery to human service clients

A/Prof Valerie A Clarke, Dr DJ Higgins

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s): Department of Human Services (Barwon-South West Region)

Summary:A proactive program managing organisational stress and isolation in rural community service organisations is urgently needed to reduce unplanned absences and costly staff turnover among professionals working in a difficult environment. The intervention program focuses on extremely high risk regional workers - professional staff having daily contact with potentially difficult clients (e.g., persons suffering from neglect, abuse, Drugs). Strategies at both organisational and individual levels will be aimed at preventing rather than merely reducing stress. An educational package will be developed, subjected to two cycles of process and outcome evaluation, and prepared for use in this and other regional/rural organisations.


Title: Safe and unsafe workplace behaviour: the impact of organisational culture and climate

Dr Dorothy Hutton, Mr P Silk, Mr J Hayes, Mr GT Walker, Mr PJ Hester

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s):1

Industry Partner(s):
KAAL Australia Pty Ltd
Kmart Australia

Summary: This APA(I) project involves a study of safety cultures of organisations and safety climates of workgroups. It will develop and trial safety interventions derived from an understanding of the normative and individual psychological contracts of safety. It is hypothesized that such contracts will impact on safety behaviors and injury rate. The project will be conducted in collaboration with Kmart and KAAL (Alcoa) who experience very different levels of risk. The ultimate aim is to develop a better understanding of the complex human systems which impact on safety behaviors and injury rates in organisations.



Title: Videoconferenced supervision for trainee professionals: Unintended effects

Dr Robyn Miller, Dr R King

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s): South West Healthcare

Summary: Government agencies are investing heavily in videoconferencing networks for purposes that include the education and supervision of trainee professionals. This initiative is seen to promote equity of access for professionals in remote regions. Yet the assumed equivalence between videoconferencing and face-to-face communication remains untested. The teaching principles underlying face-to-face communication may be inappropriate for videoconferenced supervison. Aims of the project are to develop an investigative framework for videoconferenced supervision and to determine how videoconferencing affects the learning and affiliation processes in supervision. The main outcome will be the identification of principles to establish standards of best practice for videoconferenced supervision.


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Faculty of Science and Technology

School of Architecture and Building

Title: Embodied energy modelling of individual commercial buildings

Dr Graham John Treloar, Dr BD Ilozor

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s):Sinclair Knight Merz Pty LTD

Summary: This research will develop a method for modelling the energy embodied in individual commercial building construction. Construction material manufacturing emissions are well known in most industries, but the total embodied energy of the construction supply chain is difficult to model for individual buildings. For efficient commercial buildings, the embodied energy can represent up to 40 years of operational energy. The results will be used to develop cost effective strategies for optimising the total life cycle energy of individual commercial buildings. This will in part improve the environmental performance of the Australian construction industry.



Title: Natural and Artificial Lighting Control the Energy and Visual Optimisation for a Low Energy Building

Dr Mark Brandt Luther

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s):Clipsal Integrated Systems

Summary:Artificial lighting is highlighted as the most significant area of opportunity to reduce energy as well as greenhouse emission. The application of integrated daylight design together with artificial lighting control is researched. Control strategies of switching and dimming the artificial daylighting in conjunction with set-point levels, user preferences and daylighting maximisation are measured. The goal is to find the most effective saving strategies whilst maintaining visual comfort.


Title: Researching the Development of Benchmarks for Determining both Relative and Sustainable Levels of Infrastructure for the Aged within Regional Victoria

Dr Alexander John Rollo, Dr GJ Byrne

2002: $45,090
2003: $45,090
2004: $45,090

APA(I) Award(s): 2

Industry Partner(s):
City of Greater Bendigo
Warrnambool City Council

Summary: The decline of country towns and subsequent population shifts to larger regional centres often places significant stress on the facilities within these larger centres. Of particular importance to local government are the implications regarding the provision of services for the aged. This project will research the development of benchmarks and indicators to assist local governments to understand the current and future needs of their aged communities. The research will comprise a pilot study involving the Cities of Bendigo and Warrnambool to establish the current situation regarding physical infrastructure and service provision and indicating future needs as the demographic profiles change.


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School of Biological and Chemical Sciences


Title:Development of molecular markers for resistance to blackleg disease (Leptos phaeria maculans) in canola

Dr Morley Somasundaram Muralitharan, Dr GP Kadkol, Dr DM Cahill, Dr T Stevenson, Dr SF Chandler

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s):1

Industry Partner(s):Nugrain

Summary:Canola (Brassica napus) is a valuable oil seed crop grown in many parts of the world and contributes annually $A450 million to the Australian economy. The overall aim of this project is to develop molecular markers for blackleg resistance using Australian germplasm along with evaluation in Australian disease nurseries which are regarded worldwide to develop the highest levels of disease pressure. Once molecular marker systems are developed and evaluated, they will be applied to facilitate the selection of Nugrain's (Industry Partner) canola breeding programs. Any molecular markers and QT. developed for Australian cultivars would find commercial application in breeding programmes .


Title: The Synthesis and Analysis of Certain Explosives and Illicit Drugs for Improved Forensic Detection

Dr Simon Wyndham Lewis, A/Prof NW Barnett, Dr PJ Scammells

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s):
Victoria Forensic Science Centre
South Australia Forensic Science

Summary: There is an increasing demand within law enforcement agencies, worldwide, for selective and sensitive methods for the determination of illicit substances. Over the last decade Deakin University chemists have played a major role in establishing the utility of chemiluminescent reactions for the determination of a variety of pharmaceutical opiates in process streams. This project seeks to build upon these successes, in order to develop innovative analytical strategies for forensic detection of certain illicit Drugs and explosives. The results of this research have the potential to revolutionise key aspects of forensic analysis.


School of Ecology and Environment

Title: Design and Development of DNA Oligonucleotide Microarrays (Biochips) for Fish Species Identification From Processed Food Products

Dr Christopher Mervyn Austin, Dr LJ Laurenson, Dr SA Wilcox

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s): GeneScan Australia

Summary: Australia's seafood industry (valued at A$2 billion/annum) imports and exports a wide variety of fish and shellfish products. This industry is open to exploitation, specifically in respect of product labelling. A rapid and reliable method for identifying commercial and endangered fish species in seafood products is urgently needed for effective management and regulation of the industry. New genetic biochip technology enables any species or strains of an organism to be rapidly, and accurately, identified by non-experts. In collaboration with GeneScan Australia, this project applies this new technology to develop a diagnostic tool for checking the labelling of Australian seafood products.


Title: Grazing as a management tool for biodiversity conservation: adaptive management strategies for threatened grassland ecosystems

Prof Gordon Anthony Duff, Br I Lunt, Dr F Coates

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s):1

Industry Partner(s): Parks Victoria

Summary: Lowland temperate grasslands are threatened Australian ecosystems that support an important, and in many cases threatened, biota. These habitats are significantly underrepresented in the reserve system, and occur in bioregions that have been subjected to extensive vegetation clearing, intensive production and high stocking densities. This project will develop strategies for maintenance of species and habitat diversity in grasslands through the application of adaptive management principles informed by rigorous ecological research. Outcomes include best-practise approaches to the interaction between research and biodiversity conservation.

Title: Improving water use efficiency of grapevine production in the Great Western region using effluent water and soil amelioration practises

Dr Graeme Allinson, A/Prof F Stagnitti, Dr R Armstrong

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s):
Grampians Regional Water Authority
Department of Natural Resources and Environment
Grampians Winemakers Inc.

Summary: Irrigation of vineyards with municipal wastewater is a desirable option for the viticulturists of the Great Western region of Victoria, but only if vineyard soil structure is not adversely affected. This project will (1) study the impact of dissolved chemicals in the waste water on the structure of the local sandy soils; (2) model the data to enhance understanding of the key chemical and physical mechanisms controlling grey water impact in heterogeneous environments. The resulting predictive tools will have direct application in the Great Western regions vineyards, and for irrigation of grey water in vineyards across Australia.


Title:Monitoring and Modelling Hydrogeochemical Interactions with Groundwater: Implications for Mine Dewatering on Groundwater, River and Lake Chemistry

A/Prof John Edwin Sherwood, A/Prof F Stagnitti, Mr J Hill

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s): Alcoa World Alumina Australia

Summary: Alcoa operates a power station and brown coal mine at Anglesea is western Victoria. Following heavy rain in 2000 acidic water entered the Anglesea estuary causing precipitation of iron and aluminium flocs and fish kills. Estuary closure to tourism resulted. This project will identify the cause(s) of this phenomenon by modelling groundwater movement and studying geochemical processes. The resultant hydrogeochemical model will also be applied to simulating longer term water quality changes in the catchment arising from current mine dewatering operations and future rewatering following mine closure.


Title: Planning for the adaptive management of wetland rehabilitation; Kanyapella Basin Case Study

Dr Kimberley James, Mr R Drew

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s):1

Industry Partner(s): Field and Game Australia Inc.

Summary: Australia's ephemeral wetlands are being lost or degraded primarily through Drainage. There is a pressing need to conserve the ecological character of remaining systems, and rehabilitate degraded ones. Rehabilitation is invariably constrained by water availability, community expectations and uncertainty about ecosystem responses to different water regimes. This project applies the adaptive management model to wetland rehabilitation. Adaptive management addresses uncertainty through experiments integrated into the rehabilitation process. It uses monitoring, and information feedback loops to inform current management actions. A generic model for the adaptive management of wetland rehabilitation will be developed which will predict responses to different re-wetting scenarios.


Title:Vegetation change in coastal Parks and Reserves: risk assessment and management of woody invaders

Prof Gordon Anthony Duff, Dr D Simmons, Dr F Coates

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s):Parks Victoria

Summary: Coastal health ecosystems contain some of the highest diversity of plant species for any vegetation type within temperate Australia. These communities exist within and outside the Reserve system, but even those within Parks and Reserves may be undergoing rapid change in structure and composition as a result of invading environmental weeds, resulting in a significant loss of biological diversity. As agriculture, tourism and other developments place increasing pressure on these diminishing ecosystems, the maintenance of their biodiversity takes on increasing importance. This project will identify threatening processes and devise cost-effective, practicable management strategies in a context of competing stakeholder interests.


School of Engineering and Technology


Title:A Distributed Virtual Factory in Agile Manufacturing

A/Prof Saeid Nahavandi, Dr L Kong, Dr A Kouzani

2002: $92,033
2003: $111,752
2004: $71,381

APA(I) Award(s): 2

Industry Partner(s): Backwell IXL

Summary: The aim of this research is to develop an Intelligent Distributed Virtual Factory consisting of several distributed precise simulation models connected by several synchronisation mechanisms named Time Bucker algorithms. Intelligent Distributed Virtual Factory will then be applied into precise evaluations of the whole manufacturing system under two major types of manufacturing operational logics, PULL and PUSH methods.


Title: Controlling and Predicting the Pilling Propensity of Fabrics

Prof Xungai Wang, Dr L Wang

2002: $45,090
2003: $45,090
2004: $45,090

APA(I) Award(s): 2

Industry Partner(s):
Australian Country Spinners Pty LTD
A & B Knitwear Pty LTD
Casaveen Holding Co.
Calcoup Inc Pty LTD
Country Road Clothing Co. Pty LTD
Graham Walters & Assoc. Pty LTD
Macquarie Textile Group LTD
Riverina Wool Combing Pty LTD

Summary: Pilling adversely affects the appearance of fabrics and garments. It is one of the most serious quality problems for the textile industry, particularly the wool industry. This project will examine and control the key factors that contribute to fabric pilling in the fibre-to-fibre conversion processes. It also aims to predict fabric pilling performance from these factors. This will help the industry, along the fibre to fabric chain, to understand the mechanism of pilling and to work together to manage and control this long-standing problem for the benefit of the textile industry as well as textile consumers.


Title: Development of a Microstructure Model for Process and Product Development

Prof Peter Damien Hodgson, Dr MR Barnett

2002: $72,000
2003: $64,000
2004: $64,000

APA(I) Award(s): 1

Industry Partner(s): Smorgon Steel

Summary: It is possible to mathematically model the evolution of the microstructure of steel during hot rolling and cooling to room temperature. By linking the microstructure to the product performance these models can be used for computer based development of new products and processes. The current work involves an extension of these concepts to the Smorgon Steel minimill. The project involves the development of new equations to handle the high residual content from the use of remelted scrap and the use of these models to enhance current and future local and export grades.


Title: Exploiting Annealing Reactions for New Steel Grade Development

Dr Matthew Robert Barnett, Dr E Pereloma

2002: $45,090
2003: $45,090
2004: $45,090

APA(I) Award(s): 2

Industry Partner(s): BHP Steel

Summary: Overseas steel markets are demanding thinner and cheaper formable products. The proposed work aims to establish how the reactions that take place during annealing can be exploited to create new products to meet these needs. The processes of recrystallization texture development, which controls the ease with which the product can be Drawn into shapes, precipitate dissolution, which impacts on surface quality, and creep, which can lead to annealing defects in thin products will be studied. The objective is use the knowledge generated to remove over-design of processing parameters and steel composition to develop new cost effective export grades.


Title:Hot Rolling Model for Control of Nb Bearing Steels

Prof Peter Damian Hodgson, Dr MR Barnett

2002: $22,545
2003: $22,545
2004: $22,545

APA(I) Award(s):1

Industry Partner(s): BHP Steel

Summary: High strength NB bearing strip steels are used to reduce the weight of automotive and construction products. The manufacture of theses steels is challenging because of difficulties encountered in maintaining constant properties and strip thickness. The aim of the current work is to develop a model for NB bearing steels that describes the effect processing conditions and composition on the microstructure evolution during hot rolling. The model to be developed will incorporate a new approach to describing dynamic recrystallization and will lead to better property and dimensional control. It will also assist in new grade development.


Title: The characterization and processing of Australian grown hemp fibres

Prof Xungai Wang, Adj/Prof P Brady, Dr L Wang, Dr A Kaynak

2002: $130,000
2003: $108,000
2004: $ 86,000

APA(I) Award(s): 2

Industry Partner(s): Fibrenova LTD

Summary: This project will, for the first time, systematically examine the characteristics and processing behaviour of Australian grown hemp fibres. The hemp industry is an emerging new industry in rural Australia. This research will tackle a number of complex problems concerning characterization, degumming, and processing of Australian grown hemp, and will engineer the finest and softest yarns as well as industrial products from this hemp. This will position the local hemp industry, as well as the fibre processing industry in a very strong position to meet the growing demand world wide on this "green" fibre.


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Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

1st December 2009