ARC Discovery Awards for 2004

 


Faculty of Arts

School of Communication and Creative Arts
School of Social and International Studies

Faculty of Business and Law

School of Accounting and Finance

Faculty of Education

School of Scientific and Development Studies
School of Social and Cultural Studies

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Science

School of Health Sciences
School of Psychology

Faculty of Science and Technology

School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
School of Ecology and Environment
School of Engineering and Technology
School of Information Technology


Faculty of Arts

School of Social and International Studies

Title: Capacity-building in Indonesian Islamic NGOs

Dr GJ Barton, A/Prof SM Kenny

2004 : $40,000
2005 : $50,000
2006 : $50,000
2007 : $60,000

Category: 3701 - SOCIOLOGY

Summary: This study aims to understand and monitor forms and applications of capacity-building in progressive Islamic/Muslim NGOs in Indonesia, over a four year period, in the context of profound social, economic and political change, in order to better understand how best to strengthen such groups and to assist them to become more effective. It will significantly increase our understanding of the complex cultural issues that influence these groups in their efforts to professionalise, build capacity and contribute to civil society. It will identify areas in which Western misunderstandings of Muslim culture and society have limited the effectiveness of capacity building programs.

Externally led grants

Title: Labour Matters: The Recomposition of Trade Union Action in a Globalising Era: Australia and Canada1983-2003

Prof C Lipsig-Mumme, A/Prof LI Hancock, Dr JD Buchanan, A/Prof R Lambert, Prof S McBride

2004 : $45,000
2005 : $40,000
2006 : $40,000

Category: 3502 - BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

Administering Institution: Monash University

Summary: Trade unions are struggling to craft innovative responses to globalisation's pressures, while seeking to shore up their traditional role in 'porous' national economies. We compare Australia with Canada 1983-2003: semi-peripheral countries facing similar pressures from globalisation, but responding differently in governance and trade union action. Labour innovation is set against the backdrop of changes in employment regulation and employment security. We examine innovation through national and transnational union campaigns that parallel in two countries, to evaluate innovation in Australia. Postgraduate research training in internationally comparative social science methodology is provided and results disseminated in academic, practitioner and public fora.

School of Communication and Creative Arts

Title: Spaces of Becoming: Spatial Strategies and the Formation of Modern Identities in Urban South Asia

Dr S Srivastava

2004 : $35,000
2005 : $52,000
2006 : $31,000

Category: 3703 - ANTHROPOLOGY

Summary: The intensification of urbanisation in South Asia calls for new ways of understanding the politics of identity, and social complexity. This project will explore ways in which urban spaces (such as places of worship, streetscapes, markets, festival grounds, procession routes, and 'neighbourhoods') are used by different groups as a fundamental principle of organising social relations, including transmission of culture and creation of identity. This interdisciplinary project argues that historicism - an exclusive temporal emphasis - can not capture the fundamental relationship between spaces and social processes that shapes contemporary cultural and social complexity in South Asia.

Title: Australian Literature and the Sacred: Contesting the Myth of Australian Secularism

Dr LM McCredden, Dr FM Devlin-Glass, A/Prof BD Ashcroft

2004 : $24,000
2005 : $23,906
2006 : $25,283
2007 : $24,000 (54% of request)

Category: 4202 - LITERATURE STUDIES

Summary: The dominant myth of Australian culture has stressed its modern, post-religious secularism. This project, focusing on Australian literature since 1940, challenges this most tenacious myth, current in the wider culture and in Australian literary scholarship. It will investigate how the contemporary sacred is transforming in the context of urgent recent claims to the sacred by indigenous peoples, migrants and women. This project will redefine and systematize what sacredness might mean in a supposedly secular Australian culture. It will produce a new model of the sacred in Australian literary history and make significant interventions in post-colonial debates

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Faculty of Business and Law

School of Accounting and Finance

Title: A Longitudinal Study of Recurrent Audit Failure in Australian Corporate Collapses from 1885 to the present

Prof GD Carnegie, A/Prof B O'Connell

2004 : $45,000
2005 : $50,000

Category: 3501 - ACCOUNTING, AUDITING AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Summary: As starkly illustrated with Enron in the US and with HIH in Australia, corporate collapse and audit failure may be interrelated. In response to repeated instances of audit failure, legislative and other reforms are typically adopted in order to ensure that auditor indiscretions are curtailed. Unfortunately, audit failure persists. This longitudinal Australian study of audit failure in the context of corporate collapse from the mid 1880s aims to enhance an understanding of audit failure and why it recurs. The study's findings are expected to inform future enquires and court cases and assist in developing public policy and future legislative reforms.

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Faculty of Education

School of Scientific and Development Studies

Externally led grant

Title: Maximising Success in Mathematics for Disadvantaged Students

Prof PA Sullivan, Ms JA Mousley, Prof RL Zevenbergen

2004 : $50,000
2005 : $60,000
2006 : $60,000

Category: 3302 - CURRICULUM STUDIES

Administering Institution: La Trobe University

Summary: This project aims to identify strategies that teachers can use to overcome the obvious disadvantage some school students experience in learning mathematics. Currently working class and Indigenous students in Australian schools are performing very much worse than their peers in mathematics. Some currently recommended teaching strategies may be actually exacerbating this disadvantage. This project will identify the factors contributing to the lack of success of these students, and offer strategies that teachers can use to ensure that students from disadvantaged backgrounds have the same opportunities to learn mathematics as other students.

School of Social and Cultural Studies

Title: Indigenous Teachers: Understanding their Professional Pathways and Career Experiences

Dr N Santoro, A/Prof J Reid, Dr C McConaghy

2004 : $65,000
2005 : $45,000
2006 : $42,000
2007 : $43,000

Category: 3303 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

Summary: There is an urgent need to understand the nature of the professional experience of Indigenous teachers in Australian schools. This project will produce significant new knowledge about the career experiences of former and current Indigenous educators, about the prior life experience of Indigenous teachers beginning their careers in NSW and Victorian schools, and in-depth case studies of their first three years as teachers. It will provide vital information for state and federal education and teacher education policy formation, contribute to social theory with regard to institutional racism, 'whiteness' and Australian education and advance methodologies for research about Indigenous issues.

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Faculty of Health and Behavioural Science

School of Health Sciences

Title: Personal and environmental influences on changes in adolescents' food consumption behaviours

Dr DA Crawford, Prof A Worsley

2004 : $85,000
2005 : $85,000
2006 : $85,000
2007 : $43,000

Category: 3212 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES

Summary: This project will track the eating behaviours of two groups of randomly selected adolescents between the ages of 12 and 16 years, for three years. The aims are to assess the changes that occur in their eating behaviour and to examine the influence of family, school, mass media and intrapersonal variables during this period so that predictive models can be built. This will facilitate the implementation of life skills education and the prevention of obesity, non-communicable diseases and nutrient deficiencies.


Title: Intracellular localisation of insulin signalling proteins in human skeletal muscle following exercise

Dr KF Howlett, Prof M Hargreaves

2004 : $55,000
2005 : $55,000
2006 : $55,000 (87% of request)

Category: 2701 - BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY

Summary: The metabolic action of insulin in skeletal muscle is enhanced by exercise, but the underlying mechanisms mediating this are unknown. Insulin receptor substrate proteins are key mediators in the intracellular insulin signalling pathway and play a central role in regulating many metabolic events. Our aim is to examine the hypothesis that exercise induces a novel subcellular redistribution of these insulin receptor substrate proteins in skeletal muscle, such that the metabolic action of insulin is enhanced. Elucidating the mechanisms whereby exercise enhances insulin action underpins the development of new treatments and therapies with the aim of improving skeletal muscle function in health and disease.

Externally led grant

Title: Regulatory mechanisms in skeletal muscle lipid hydrolysis

A/Prof MA Febbraio, Prof M Hargreaves, Dr MJ Watt, Prof LL Spriet

2004 : $75,000
2005 : $75,000
2006 : $75,000

Category: 2701 - BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY

Administering Institution: RMIT University

Summary: The regulation of intramuscular triglyceride (fat) utilisation by human skeletal muscle is largely unknown. Our contention is that the specialized protein enzyme, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), has a fundamental role in intramuscular triacylglycerol utilisation and is regulated by both intramuscular levels of key metabolites and circulating hormone concentrations. We also propose control points subsequent to HSL activation are important for triglyceride hydrolysis. Our proposed project examines these factors and will enhance our understanding of the regulation of muscle fat use, thereby leading to potential metabolic strategies (nutritional, pharmacological) that enhance skeletal muscle function at rest and during exercise.

School of Psychology

Title: The etiology of social anxiety and its impact on development across the lifespan

Dr KA Moore, Dr DJ Mellor

2004 : $40,000
2005 : $40,000 (50% of request – 2 instead of 3 yrs)

Category: 3801 - PSYCHOLOGY

Summary: Social anxiety is a distressing early-onset disorder often associated with other psychiatric conditions in later life. This study will extend our previous work that has identified factors associated with its onset. We propose that these factors and the social anxiety itself may disrupt psychosocial development, at the time of onset, and throughout the lifespan. We aim to investigate these innovative hypotheses through a sequence of three studies, with adults, children and adolescents. The results will inform prevention and early intervention regimes, thereby reducing both the incidence of social anxiety and the burden of the disorder.

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Faculty of Science and Technology

School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

Externally led grant

Title: Bacterial Cell Division: Discovering how it begins and the network of protein interactions it requires

Dr EJ Harry, Prof J Errington, Dr PL Beech, Prof D Ehrlich

2004 : $100,000
2005 : $100,000
2006 : $100,000

Category: 2703 - MICROBIOLOGY

Administering Institution: The University of Sydney

Summary: All cells must coordinate cell division with chromosome replication to ensure that the DNA is partitioned equally into newborn cells. We will establish the defect of a novel mutant blocked in the earliest stage of cell division in bacteria to obtain unique information about this vital regulatory step. We will use our newly discovered protein interaction network to establish what role protein interactions play in integrating cell division with other biological pathways in the cell to ensure its tight regulation. Our discoveries will facilitate the design of new antibiotics that target cell division to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria and bioterrorism organisms.

School of Ecology and Environment

Title: Late palaeozoic palaeogeography of Central Asia: A palaeobiogeographical approach using improved biostratigraphy

Dr ZQ Chen

2004 : $70,000
2005 : $70,000
2006 : $70,000

Category: 2601 - GEOLOGY

Summary: Fossil data from Central Asia (Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, NW China, Mongolia, Altaids) indicate significant degree of palaeo-latitudinal variation in biogeographical patterns across the Palaeo-Tethys and its flanking shelves during Late Palaeozoic, but details of these patterns and implications for enhancing contemporaneous palaeogeographical models are virtually unknown. This project will analyse the biogeographical patterns of Late Palaeozoic brachiopod, coral, fusulinid faunas using advanced statistical methods, and integrate biogeographical signals with palaeomagnetic data to constrain models for the Late Palaeozoic geological evolution of Central Asia-a vast region that is known to bear enormous potential for natural resources but remains geologically little explored.

Externally led grant

Title: Refining Restoration Ecology: Is Range of Historical Variability an appropriate concept to guide ecosystem management and restoration?

Dr ID Lunt, Dr A Bennett, Dr I Oliver

2004 : $50,000

Category: 2707 - ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION

Administering Institution: Charles Sturt University

Summary: Ecosystem restoration is an urgent task in many Australian landscapes. Range of Historical Variability (RHV) theory provides an influential but largely untested framework to guide restoration activities. We will test the RHV proposition that biodiversity conservation is enhanced if the structure of altered ecosystems is restored within the pre-settlement range. Plants, vertebratesand invertebrates will be compared between unrestored Callitris woodlands dominated by post-settlement regrowth, and restored stands where regrowth has been reduced within the RHV. This will be the first test of RHV theory to encompass a range of taxonomic and functional groups at both local and landscape scales.

School of Engineering and Technology

Title: Modelling twinning transitions in light metals: a new foundation for alloy and process development

Dr MR Barnett

2004 : $117,000
2005 : $117,000
2006 : $117,000
2007 : $117,000
2008 : $117,000

Category: 2913 - METALLURGY

Summary: Australia’s quest to become a world leader in light metals technology is being held back by a lack of quantitative understanding of the metallurgical behaviour of magnesium, which is the lightest engineering metal, and titanium, which is the strongest light metal. In particular, there is poor knowledge of the influence of material parameters on deformation twinning. This knowledge is vital for efficient production and optimised alloy and part design. This proposal aims to develop a quantitative understanding oftransitions in twinning activation for improved performance in fatigue, crash behaviour, structural integrity, forming, forging, extruding, hot rolling and annealing.

Title: Developing Intelligent Systems for Manufacturing Control

Dr Y Frayman, Dr BF Rolfe

2004 : $60,000
2005 : $60,000
2006 : $60,000

Category: 2903 - MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING

Summary: The primary aim of this project is to develop control systems that interactively learn from the environment to increase the capabilities and performance of manufacturing processes. To achieve this we propose to develop manufacturing control systems that can automatically adapt to the changes in the process under control. Since these systems are expected to operate with limited or no human intervention, they need to be intelligent enough to be able to learn from a changing environment and adapt correspondingly in order to achieve and maintain performance objectives.

Title: The development of optimum microstructures in hot worked metals

Prof PD Hodgson, Dr MR Barnett, Prof JH Beynon, Prof WM Rainforth

2004 : $75,000
2005 : $75,000
2006 : $80,000

Category: 2913 - METALLURGY

Summary: Hot working is used to obtain the shape and properties of a wide range of metal products. At present our knowledge of how to control the forming process and properties of the final product is limited to laboratory conditions that do not apply in industry. This work will systematically study the deformation behaviour of a range of metals, including steel, titanium, aluminium, magnesium and copper from standard laboratory to real industrial conditions. We will develop advanced models to predict the properties of these metals for any hot working process and identify opportunities to develop new high strength products.

School of Information Technology

Title: A Model for IT Security Outsourcing of Critical Services

A/Prof MJ Warren A/Prof WE Hutchinson

2004 : $40,000
2005 : $40,000 (89% of request)

Category: 2801 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Summary: IT security outsourcing is the establishment of a contractual relationship with an outside vendor to assume responsibility for one or more security functions. The decision-making process associated with outsourcing security is complex. To improve the effectiveness of the decision-making process a conceptual model that integrates security benefits, costs and their respective performance measures will be developed. This model will support management in their aim of overseeing IT security effectively. The research will make a valuable contribution towards determining the impact of IT security outsourcing within Australia.

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Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

1st December 2009