Deakin University Animal Ethics Committee

The Deakin University Animal Ethics Committee (AEC) is responsible for approving and monitoring the use of animals in research and teaching at Deakin University. The primary responsibility of the AEC is to ensure that all institutional activities are conducted in compliance with Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1986 (and corresponding Regulations 2008; and the Australian code of practice for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes (8th Edition 2013).

Deakin University Animal Ethics Committee (AEC)

Deakin University has two Animal Ethics Committee's as follows:

  • Animal Ethics Committee Burwood (AECB)
  • Animal Ethics Committee Geelong (AECG)
Deakin University AEC Term of Reference

Each Committee functions independently, conducting business separately and in accordance with the responsibilities under Section 2.3 of the Australian Code of Practice for the Care and Use of Animals for Scientific Purposes 8th Edition (the Code). 

In accordance with the Code, an AEC must comprise at least four persons, one from each of the following categories:

  • Category A: Veterinary surgeon with experience relevant to the activities of the institution
  • Category B: Scientist or teacher with substantial recent experience in animal based research or teaching
  • Category C: a person with demonstrable commitment to, and established experience in, furthering the welfare of animals, who is not employed by or otherwise associated with the institution, and who is not involved in the care and use of animals for scientific purposes
  • Category D: Layperson who has never engaged in the use of animals for scientific purposes beyond their undergraduate education and who is independent of the institution
Role of the Animal Ethics Committee

The primary responsibility of the AECs is to ensure on behalf of Deakin University that all activities relating to the care and use of animals is conducted in compliance with the Code. The role of the AEC is to ensure that the use of animals is justified, provides due consideration for the welfare of the animals involved and incorporates the principles of Replacement, Reduction and Refinement (the 3R's).

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