Dr Jamie Byrne

STAFF PROFILE

Position

Lecturer, Psychology

Faculty

Faculty of Health

Department

School of Psychology

Campus

Melbourne Burwood Campus

Contact

jamie.byrne@deakin.edu.au
+61 3 924 46853

Biography

Jamie Byrne completed her Clinical PhD looking at the interactions between circadian rhythms (body clock), sleep, and the reward system. She uses neuroimaging, physiological, behavioural, and psychological methods to interrogate how these three important (and interrelated) domains of functioning may be involved in the emergence of mental illnesses. 

Dr Byrne gives talks to school and parent groups aimed at educating the community on the importance of sleep and circadian rhythm hygiene, and its relevance to mental health and learning outcomes.

Read more on Jamie's profile

Career highlights

Byrne, J. E. M. & Murray, G. (2019). Circadian and sleep modulation of positive affect. In J. Gruber (Ed.) Oxford Handbook of Positive Emotion and Psychopathology

Byrne, J. E. M., Tremain, H., Leitan, N. D., Keating, C., Johnson, S. L. & Murray, G. (2019). Circadian modulation of reward function: Is there an evidentiary signal in existing neuroimaging studies?. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 99, 251-274. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.025

Byrne, J. E. M., Bullock, B., Brydon, A. & Murray, G. (2019). A psychometric investigation of the SCRAM questionnaire. Chronobiology International, 36(2), 265-275. https://doi.org/10.1080/07420528.2018.1533850

Murray, G., Orr, C., Byrne, J. E. M., Hughes, M. E., Rossell, S. L., & Johnson, S. L. (2018). Effect of time of day on reward circuitry: Further thoughts on methods, prompted by Steel et al 2018. Retrieved from https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.12245

Byrne, J. E. M., Bullock, B. & Murray, G. (2017). Development of a novel measure of sleep, circadian rhythms, and mood: The SCRAM Questionnaire. Frontiers in Psychology, 8(2105). doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02105

Byrne, J. E. M. & Murray, G. (2017). The sleep and circadian modulation of neural reward pathways: A systematic review protocol. Systematic Reviews, 6(237). doi:10.1186/s13643-017-0631-3

Byrne, J. E. M., Hughes, M. E., Rossell, S. L., Johnson, S. L., & Murray, G. (2017). Time of day differences in neural reward functioning in healthy young men. The Journal of Neuroscience, 37(37), 8895-8900. doi:10.1523/jneurosci.0918-17.2017

Byrne, J. E. M. & Murray, G. (2017) Diurnal rhythms in psychological reward functioning in healthy young men: ‘wanting’, liking and learning. Chronobiology International, 34(2), 287-295. doi: 10.1080/07420528.2016.1272607

Beanland, V., Le, R. K. & Byrne, J. E. M. (2016). Object-scene relationships vary the magnitude of target prevalence effects in visual search. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42(6), 766-775. doi: 10.1037/xhp0000183

Research interests

Circadian rhythms, sleep, reward, positive emotions/mood, bipolar disorder, mental illness, mechanisms involved in mental illness onset

Teaching interests

Clinical psychology

Units taught

HPS105

HPY210

Knowledge areas

Circadian rhythms, sleep, reward, positive emotions/mood, bipolar disorder, mental illness, mechanisms involved in mental illness onset

Expertise

Jamie Byrne completed her Clinical PhD looking at the interactions between circadian rhythms (body clock), sleep, and the reward system. Dr Byrne uses neuroimaging, physiological, behavioural, and psychological methods to interrogate how these three important (and interrelated) domains of functioning may be involved in the emergence of mental illnesses.
  • Counselling
  • Psychology

Projects

The BEAT study. Investigation of the neural mechanisms involved in circadian rhythms of momentary reward motivation

Mental health correlates of grit. A preliminary investigation of how the construct of grit relates to the risk and course of serious mental health disorders (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder).

COGSBD study. Examining the relationship between perception, cognition and emotion processing in bipolar disorder by adopting a variety of methods to probe their underlying cognitive, genetic and biological correlates through the use of neuroimaging, neuropsychological, clinical and genetic measures

Publications

Filter by

2019

Circadian modulation of human reward function: is there an evidentiary signal in existing neuroimaging studies?

Jamie Byrne, Hailey Tremain, Nuwan Leitan, Charlotte Keating, Sheri Johnson, Greg Murray

(2019), Vol. 99, pp. 251-274, Neuroscience & biobehavioral reviews, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, C1

journal

Funded Projects at Deakin

No Funded Projects at Deakin found

Supervisions

No completed student supervisions to report