Centre for Energy, the Environment and Natural Disasters

The Centre for Energy, the Environment and Natural Disasters will place Deakin Business School at the forefront of contemporary debates on energy, the environment and natural disasters.

The centre seeks to build upon the existing research and industry strengths in the Business School and substantially expand them.

Global development

Energy and the environment play a crucial role in global development.

The European Commission for Global Development has announced that one of the key components for global development post 2015 is to improve global and domestic regulatory and policy frameworks for oceans, water, soil, energy production, air, pollution and wildlife.

Similarly, the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future, reiterated the call by the General Assembly of the United Nations for what it described as a global agenda of change.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) report on 'Scientific Cooperation in Disaster Reduction and Conflict Resolution' has emphasised the need for strengthened scientific cooperation as a key element for improving capacity for disaster risk reduction and the restoration of biological diversity. It has also documented that many natural and man-made disasters are crucially linked to sharing natural resources and managing natural hazard risks.

There is also growing research evidence that the frequency and intensity of natural disasters are strongly related to the climate change and associated weather extremities, with strong implications on energy demand, supply, as well as the environment. All these indicate the obvious need for relating energy and environment policies with natural disaster for future sustainability of our global village.

Our focus

The focus for the Centre for Energy, the Environment and Natural Disasters (CEEND) is to:

  • accelerate the creation of long-term environmental strategies for achieving sustainable development
  • improve and facilitate domestic and global strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation
  • improve economical and social development in the use and exploitation of resources and environmental management among developing and developed countries
  • implement aspirational regulatory and policy goals for local and international communities to improve energy, resource and environmental management.
  • analyse the economic impact of natural disasters both for Australia and in international context,
  • and work collaboratively with the private and public sectors to generate research evidence for informed policy response on optimal disaster risk management.

These goals have been recognised by the Chief Scientist of Australia, which listed supporting the development of reliable, low-cost, sustainable energy supplies and enhancing the long term viability of Australia's resources industries as one of its core strategic research priorities.

CEEND will provide opportunities for research and engagement in these crucially important areas of domestic and global concern. It will seek to liaise with industry, government and academia.

Centre Research

In an interview with the Australian in August 2018, Centre Deputy director, Dr Shudda Rafiq has responded to the ACCC inquiry into retail electricity pricing, the National Energy Guarantee, as a good initiative but also an as example of “political myopia”, mired in an ideological debate between coal versus renewable energy. See his full comments in The Future Examined: Nuclear power should be part of energy mix.

Research grants

Optimizing Post-Disaster Recovery Interventions in Australia

Ulubasoglu. M. Optimizing Post-Disaster Recovery Interventions in Australia. Funding Body: The Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre, Australian Federal Government. Funding Amount: $560,000. Project Period: 2017-2020.

The primary objective of this research project is to estimate the sector-disaggregated economic effects of the QLD Floods 2010-11, the Black Saturday Bushfires 2009, and Cyclone Oswald 2013 to support the decision-making process in the design of post-disaster recovery interventions.

Research End Users
The project engages several end-users from various layers in the Australian Federal and State Governments, and benefits from their feedback with the purpose of providing a research output that could be utilised in informed decision-making. The project end-users include representatives from Emergency Management Australia within the Attorney General's Department, Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning, Victoria, and Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources, South Australia.

Pre-Disaster Multi-Hazard Damage and Economic Loss Estimation Model

Ulubasoglu, M. and Rajabifard, A. Pre-Disaster Multi-Hazard Damage and Economic Loss Estimation Model. Funding Body: The Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre, Australian Federal Government. Funding Amount: $525,000. Project Period: 2014-2016.

The emergency response system in Australia has proven to be effective in saving lives but the mitigation and preparedness phases in disaster risk reduction appear to be less successful in minimising the adverse economic impacts of natural disasters. This project investigates, at the national level, the economic impact of natural disasters on sectoral growth of the Australian economy.

Research End Users
The project engages several end-users from various layers in the Australian Federal and State Governments, and benefits from their feedback with the purpose of providing a research output that could be utilised in informed decision-making. The project end-users include representatives from Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources, South Australia, Attorney General's Department, Geoscience Australia, NSW Rural Fire Service, SA Rural Fire Service, and Country Fire Authority.

Developing Climate Inclusive Potential Loss and Damage Assessment Methodology for Flood Hazards

Ulubasoglu, M. and Guven, C. Developing Climate Inclusive Potential Loss and Damage Assessment Methodology for Flood Hazards. Funding Body: Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre, Bangkok, Thailand. Funding Amount: $25,500, Project Period: 2015-2018.

Selected publications

2018

  • Gunasekera, D 2018, 'Bridging the energy and meteorology information gap', in A Troccoli (ed), Weather & Climate Services for the Energy Industry, Palgrave McMillan, UK, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-68418-5_1
  • Newth, D and Gunasekera, D, 2018,  ‘Projected Changes in Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature under Alternative Climate Scenarios’ Atmosphere, vol. 9, pp. 187; doi:10.3390/atmos9050187

2017

  • Bhattacharya, M, Rafiq, S, & Bhattacharya, S 2017, 'Economic growth, technology and carbon dioxide emissions in an integrated framework: new evidence from India with policy implications for the coal sector', Applied Energy, vol. 204, pp. 667–678.
  • Rafiq, S, Nielsen, I, & Smyth, R 2017, 'Effect of internal migration on the environment in China', Energy Economics, vol. 64, pp. 31–44.
  • Rahman, MH, Anbarci, N, Bhattacharya, P, & Ulubasoglu, M 2017, 'Can extreme rainfall trigger democratic change? the role of flood-induced corruption', Public Choice, vol. 171, pp. 331–358.
  • Rahman, MH, Anbarci, N, Bhattacharya, P, & Ulubasoglu, M 2017, 'The shocking origins of political transitions? evidence from earthquakes', Southern Economic Journal, vol. 83, pp. 796–823.

2016

  • Rafiq, S, Sgro, P, & Apergis, N 2016, 'Asymmetric oil shocks and external balances of major oil exporting and importing countries', Energy Economics, vol. 56, pp. 42–50.
  • Rafiq, S, Salim, R, & Nielsen, I 2016, 'Urbanization, openness, emissions and energy intensity: a study of increasingly urbanized emerging economies', Energy Economics, vol. 56, pp. 20–28.
  • Rafiq, S, Salim, R, & Smyth, R 2016, 'The moderating role of firm age in the relationship between R&D expenditure and financial performance: evidence from Chinese and US mining firms', Economic Modelling, vol. 56, pp. 122–132.
  • Rafiq, S, & Bloch, H 2016, 'Explaining commodity prices through asymmetric oil shocks: evidence from nonlinear models', Resources Policy, vol. 50, pp. 34–48.
  • Rafiq, S, Salim, RA & Apergis, N 2015, 'Agriculture, trade openness and co2 emissions: evidence from linear and nonlinear panel estimations', The Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, vol. 60, pp. 1–18.

2015

  • Bhattacharya, M, Rafiq, S, & Bhattacharya, S 2015. 'The role of technology on the dynamics of coal consumption-economic growth: new evidence from China', Applied Energy, vol. 154, pp. 686–695.
  • Bloch, H, Rafiq, S, & Salim, RA 2015, 'Economic growth with coal, oil and renewable energy consumption in China: prospects for fuel substitution', Economic Modelling, vol. 44, pp. 104–115.
  • Newton, JD, Tsarenko, Y, Ferraro, C, & Sands, S 2015, 'Environmental concern and environmental purchase intentions: the mediating role of learning strategy', Journal of Business Research, vol. 68, no. 9, pp. 1974–1981.
  • Newton, JD, Newton, FJ, Salzberger, T, & Ewing, MT 2015, 'A cross-nationally validated model of environmental coaction', International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 3–4, pp. 350–365.
  • Yiyong, C, Newth, D, Finnigan, J, & Gunasekera, D 2015, ‘A hybrid energy-economy model for global integrated assessment of climate change, carbon mitigation and energy transformation’, Applied Energy, vol. 148, pp. 381–395.

2014

  • Gunasekera, D 2014, 'Renewables: the sky is the limit', Nature, vol. 514, p. 168.
  • Hanslow, K, Gunasekera, D, Cullen, B, & Newth, D 2014, 'Economic impacts of climate change on the Australian dairy sector', Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 60–77, doi: 10.1111/1467-8489.12021
  • Rafiq, S, Bloch, H, & Salim, RA 2014, 'Determinants of renewable energy adoption in China and India: a comparative analysis', Applied Economics, vol. 46, no. 22, pp. 2700–2710.
  • Rafiq, S, & Salim, RA 2014, 'Does oil price volatility matter for Asian emerging economies?' Economic Analysis and Policy, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 417–441.

Our Team

Director
Professor Mehmet Ulubasoglu

Deputy Director
Dr Shuddha Rafiq

Members

Deakin School of Business

Associate members

Research Fellow, Centre for Supply Chain & Logistics (CSCL), Faculty of Science, Engineering & Built Environment (SEBE)
Dr Don Gunasekera

Industry Manager

PhD students

Merve Kucuk

Bo Yu