Bachelor of Science

Course summary for local students

Year2017 course information
Award granted Bachelor of Science
Campus

Offered at Burwood (Melbourne), Waurn Ponds (Geelong), Warrnambool

Cloud CampusNo
Length3 years full-time or part-time equivalent
Next available intake

March (Trimester 1), July (Trimester 2)

Tuition fee rateAvailable fee rates for 2017 can be found at www.deakin.edu.au/fees
LevelUndergraduate
Faculty contacts

Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment
Tel 03 9244 6699
Email: sebe@deakin.edu.au

www.deakin.edu.au/life-environmental-sciences

Clearly-in ATAR
Burwood (Melbourne): 66.80
Waurn Ponds (Geelong): 57.00
CRICOS course code083996G
VTAC Codes1400314401 - Waurn Ponds (Geelong), Commonwealth Supported Place (HECS)
1400514401 - Burwood (Melbourne), Commonwealth Supported Place (HECS)
1400714401 - Warrnambool, Commonwealth Supported Place (HECS)
Deakin course code S320

Course sub-headings

Course overview

Science at Deakin is a flexible degree that allows you to explore a diverse range of science-related study areas before you choose to specialise in at least one area of interest as you progress through the course. The degree is about more than just laboratory work, and prepares you for a diverse range of real-life settings in which today's science graduates work. Majors are available in Animal Biology, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Chemistry and Materials Science, Environmental Science, Geography, Human Biology, Mathematical Modelling, Natural History and Plant Biology.

Throughout the course you’ll gain experience through practical programs undertaken in modern teaching laboratories, complete a Community Science Project and have an opportunity to undertake an Industry-Based Learning placement, which will provide you with valuable work experience before you graduate.

This course is available as a single degree or as a combined degree course with Arts, Commerce, Law and Teaching.

Units in the course may include assessment hurdle requirements.

Fees and charges

Fees and charges vary depending on your course, your fee category and the year you started. To find out about the fees and charges that apply to you, visit www.deakin.edu.au/fees.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this course may find career opportunities in government institutions, in roles such as quality assurance, occupational health and safety, research, planning, management or marketing; science related industries, working in pharmaceutical production or pharmaceutical sales; biomedical science areas such as research or hospital and laboratory science; quality assurance in analytical and diagnostic laboratories; the food industry in quality control; environment and natural resources, fisheries resource management, aquaculture management, teaching, information technology, mathematics or science journalism to name a few.

Course Learning Outcomes

Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes (DGLOs)

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

1.  Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities: appropriate to the level of study related to a discipline or profession.

  • Apply a broad and coherent knowledge of the scientific disciplines of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and the environment within the chosen major area(s) of study to demonstrate a deep understanding of scientific facts, scientific practices and the edifice of science.
  • Apply technical knowledge and skills and use them in a range of activities, in a professional and/or academic setting within the major area(s) of study; this application of technical knowledge and skills being characterised by demonstrable in-depth knowledge of scientific methods and tools, and demonstrable proficiency in the utilisation of chosen major area(s) knowledge.
  • Use hypotheses, laws, facts and theories to investigate, test, analyse, and evaluate scientific data and demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility to argue about characteristics and aspects of scientific theory in the advancement of science.

2.  Communication: using oral, written and interpersonal communication to inform, motivate and effect change.

  • Demonstrate listening skills and the ability to use a range of communication skills to accommodate, encourage and answer audience questions.
  • Articulate the boundaries or limits of scientific information, experimental or field data, discuss error, probability, uncertainty, conclusions and arguments.
  • Judge how well to present essential details of scientific procedures, key observations, results and conclusions in a professional manner using appropriate style, language and references including local, national, and international contributions or contexts.

3.  Digital literacy: using technologies to find, use and disseminate information.

  • Use well-developed technical skills, judgement and responsibility to independently locate, analyse, evaluate the merits of, synthesise and disseminate scientific literature, information, data and results.

4.  Critical thinking: evaluating information using critical and analytical thinking and judgment.

  • Locate and evaluate scientific information from multiple sources and use scientific methods and frameworks to structure and plan observations, experimentation or fieldwork investigations.
  • Use critical and analytical thinking and judgement to analyse, synthesise and generate an integrated knowledge, formulate hypotheses and test them against evidence-based scientific concepts and principles.

5.  Problem solving: creating solutions to authentic (real world and ill-defined) problems.

  • Use initiative and creativity in planning, identifying and using multiple approaches to recognise, clarify, construct and solve problems taking into account relevant contextual factors.
  • Advocate scientific methodologies, hypotheses, laws, facts and principles to create solutions to authentic real world problems.

 

6. Self-management:          working and learning independently, and taking responsibility for personal actions.

  • Take personal, professional and social responsibility within changing professional science contexts to develop autonomy as learners and evaluate own performance.
  • Work autonomously, responsibly and safely to solve unstructured problems and actively apply knowledge of regulatory frameworks and scientific methodologies to make informed choices.

7. Teamwork: working and learning with others from different disciplines and backgrounds.

  • Work independently and collaboratively as a team to contribute towards achieving team goals and thereby demonstrate interpersonal skills including the ability to brainstorm, negotiate, resolve conflicts, managing difficult and awkward conversations, provide constructive feedback and work in diverse professional, social and cultural contexts.

8.  Global citizenship: engaging ethically and productively in the professional context and with diverse communities and cultures in a global context

  • Apply scientific knowledge and skills with a high level of autonomy, judgement, responsibility and accountability in collaboration with others to articulate the place and importance of science in the local and global community.

 Approved by Faculty Board 14 July 2016

Course rules

To complete the Bachelor of Science, students must attain 24 credit points. Most units (think of units as ‘subjects’) are equal to 1 credit point. So that means in order to gain 24 credit points, you’ll need to study 24 units (AKA ‘subjects’) over your entire degree. Most students choose to study 4 units per trimester, and usually undertake two trimesters each year.

The 24 credit points include 8 core units (these are compulsory), 10 elective units (you can choose which ones to study) and 6 units from a major study (you will be required to complete at least one major).

 

Major sequences

Refer to the details of each major sequence for availability.
Students must complete at least one major from the following areas:

 

Course structure

Core

SLE111Cells and Genes

SLE103Ecology and the Environment

SIT191Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis

SLE123Physics for the Life Sciences

SLE209History and Philosophy of Science

EES200Communicating Science

SLE352Community Science Project #

SLE010Laboratory and Fieldwork Safety Induction Program (0 credit points)

STP010Introduction to Work Placements (0 credit points)

Chemistry - choose one from:

SLE133Chemistry in Our World ^

SLE155Chemistry for the Professional Sciences ^

^Note: Students who have not completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE133 Chemistry in Our World in Trimester 1.  Students who have completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences in Trimester 2.

# Must have successfully completed STP010 Introduction to Work Placements (0 credit point unit)

Electives

Select from a range of elective units offered across many courses. In some cases you may even be able to choose elective units from a completely different discipline area (subject to meeting unit requirements).

Entry requirements - general

Deakin University offers admission to undergraduate courses through a number of Admission categories.

In all categories of admission, selection is based primarily on academic merit as indicated by an applicant's previous academic record.

For more information on the Admission Criteria and Selection Policy visit The Guide.

Entry requirements - specific

Applicants should have successfully completed VCE or equivalent. Refer to the VTAC Guide for the latest pre-requisite information www.vtac.edu.au

Those aged 21 or over on 1 January and who do not hold VCE or equivalent should apply under Alternative Admission. This category is open to those who do not satisfy normal entrance requirements, but can demonstrate relevant work or life experience.

Credit for prior learning - general

The University aims to provide students with as much credit as possible for approved prior study or informal learning which exceeds the normal entrance requirements for the course and is within the constraints of the course regulations. Students are required to complete a minimum of one-third of the course at Deakin University, or four credit points, whichever is the greater. In the case of certificates, including graduate certificates, a minimum of two credit points within the course must be completed at Deakin.

You can also refer to the Credit for Prior Learning System which outlines the credit that may be granted towards a Deakin University degree.

Credit for prior learning - specific

The Faculty may give credit towards a BSc for previous tertiary study and other approved forms of post-secondary study or experience. This previous study need not have led to a complete qualification; for example, a student may be given credit after completing the first year of a course at another institution. All applications for advanced standing must be made initially to the Selection/Enrolment Officer who will advise students of the necessary procedures.

All applications are considered on merit and usually no credit will be given for subjects/courses/units completed more than seven years prior to the request. For the BSc the maximum credit for prior learning that can be granted is 16 credit points. This may include up to 8 credits for non-science studies.

How to apply

Check our Trimester 3 site to see if this course is having a Trimester 3 intake.

Applications for Trimester 3 are made directly to the University through the Applicant Portal.

For information on the application process and closing dates, see the Apply web page. Please note that closing dates may vary for individual courses.

Workload

You can expect to participate in a range of teaching activities each week. This could include classes, seminars, practicals and online interaction. You can refer to the individual unit details in the course structure for more information. You will also need to study and complete assessment tasks in your own time.

Work experience

You will have an opportunity to undertake a discipline-specific Industry-Based Learning placement as part of your course. This will provide you with the opportunity to apply and consolidate what you are learning in your course, experience workplace culture and workplace practices, explore career options and develop a professional network before you graduate. deakin.edu.au/sebe/students/wil.