2022 HDR Reconnecting Conference

About the 2022 HDR Reconnecting Conference

The Faculty is delighted to announce that the 2022 HDR Reconnecting Conference will be held at the Geelong Waterfront campus on Friday 4th and Saturday 5th February 2022.

Registrations are taken on a first come basis (registrations are date and time stamped when received) and in line with COVID and room capacity restrictions applicable at the time of the conference, attendance numbers may need to be capped.  Registrations will be open for a 7 day period unless capacity is reached prior. Once capacity numbers have been reached a waiting list will be kept and offers made if a place becomes available.

The 2022 Reconnecting Conference will be on a smaller scale from previous years.  It will be for 2 full days.  The Faculty won't be providing accommodation or travel, attendees will need to book their own and seek reimbursement after the event.  Please be aware that the Faculty will not be able to reimburse for flights.  These will be candidates personal costs. All attendees must be fully vaccinated and provided this evidence prior through the  Deakin’s online Vaccination Status form. QR code check in and vaccination status will be checked when entering this event.

Program Information

Friday 4th February 2022

9.00am

Arrival – collect name tags

Lower Level 2 Costa Hall Outer Foyer

9.15am

Opening

Welcome to Country

Reconnecting – Faculty Welcome – Professor Andrea Witcomb, Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Arts and Education

D2.193

9.45am

Keynote Speaker – “Connecting to the Culture: The PhD Journey”

Professor Richard Frankland

Professor of Interdisciplinary Art

Faculty of Arts and Education, School of Communication and Creative Arts

D2.193

10.30am

Professor Vanessa Lemm

Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts and Education

D2.193

11.00am

Mini Movement Breaks

Dr Lucinda McKnight

D2.193

11.15am

Meet the Team – Faculty Research Services and Graduate Research Academy

D2.193

12.00pm

Lunch

A time for candidates to arrange to meet with their Supervisor

Lower Level 2 Costa Hall Outer Foyer

1.15pm

Workshops – Session 1

What Examiners look for

A/Prof Trace Ollis

Year 1 of your PhD – Towards Confirmation

Dr Maree Pardy

Analysis, results and knowledge: Messy to neat?

A/Prof Julianne Lynch

The exegesis in Creative Research

Professor David McCooey

Dr Olivia Millard

My Ethics Application

Rhiannon Clanchy


Is research still a colonial practice?

Professor Mark Rose

The Structure of argument

A/Professor George Duke

2.30pm

Workshops – Session 2

How to get your work published and read

Dr Lucinda McKnight

Ms Amy Sellers


From PhD to Post doc

Dr Luci Pangrazio

Developing and evidencing skills during your HDR candidature

Dr Daniela Kaleva

Value adding: What DUSA can add to your PhD experience?

Ms Georgia Harris

Does Anyone Know What You Did Last Summer?: Harnessing Social Media as a Researcher

Dr Adam Brown

Dr Emily Wade

3.30pm

Afternoon tea

Lower Level 2 Costa Hall Outer Foyer

4.00pm

Student Presentations

Late Phase Presentations

Facilitator:             A/Prof Trace Ollis

Mid Phase Presentations

Facilitator:             Dr Maree Pardy

Pre -Confirmation Presentations

Facilitator: A/Prof Rea Dennis

5.30pm

Conclusion Day 1

Saturday 5th February 2022

9.15am

Arrival

Lower Level 2 Costa Hall Outer Foyer

9.30am

Reading Groups

Dark Social Studies: Critical perspectives on AI

A/Prof Toija Cinque

The animal body in the politics of capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy

Dr Yamini Narayanan

The power and politics of time

Dr Marilyn Stendera

What are some creative ways of presenting the discussion?

Dr Glenn Auld

Polluted/ polluting young people

Dr Eve Mayes

Critical Policy Scholarship

Dr Tebeje Molla

Cultural Politics and the Authoritarian Personality: What Is Authoritarian Culture?

A/Prof Geoff Boucher

Decolonising Cultural Heritage: Challenges, Opportunities, Limitations

Dr Jason Gibson

Materiality and Us, Dr Lienors Torre

10.30am

School Sessions

Communication and Creative Arts

Education/REDI/Cradle

Humanities and Social Sciences/ADI

12.00pm

Lunch

Poster Presentation judging

Lower Level 2 Costa Hall Outer Foyer

1.00pm

Workshops

“Axiology”: How values lead your research

Prof Gabby Fletcher

Progressing Creative Research with Methodology

Prof Stefan Greuter

Digital Research Methodologies

Dr Earvin Cabalquinto

Storytelling in the thesis: what voices to use and where?

Dr Kate Hall

Dr Donna Frieze

Researching with others: Keys to collaboration

Prof Katya Johanson and Prof Hilary Glow

Hitchhikers Guide to 21st century Survey Results

Prof Andrew Singleton

Writing the Abstract: A short writing workshop

Dr Joanne O’Mara

Settler Researchers and first nations participants and histories

A/Prof Emily Potter

A/Prof Tiffany Shellam

2.00pm

Life After the PhD

Panel Discussion

D2.193

3.00pm

Afternoon tea

Lower Level 2 Costa Hall Outer Foyer

3.30pm

3MT

D2.193

4.30pm

3MT and Poster Presentations Winners Announced

Plenary

Evaluation

D2.193

Registration

Capacity for the conference has now been reached

Keynote speakers

“Connecting to the Culture: The PhD Journey”

Professor Richard Frankland

Richard is Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts, in the School of Communication and Creative Arts – Faculty of Arts and Education, on Deakin University’s Warrnambool campus and is working to build a healing centre on Gunditjmara country. With a PhD in Visual and Performing Arts from University of Melbourne (2019) Richard was formerly the Head of Programs and Curriculum at The Wilin Centre and Associate Dean (Inclusion & Diversity) – Victorian College of the Arts – University of Melbourne (2017-2020).

From 2016-2019 Richard has been involved in Treaty Consultations in which Aboriginal people in Victoria called on the Victorian Government to negotiate a treaty and in 2018 spoke about this work at the Gama Festival.

Richard’s company Koorreen Enterprises has been involved in significant culture building work over the past ten years. In 2014, it was named as a finalist in the Business Category, of the Australian Human Rights Commission Awards for the work in Lateral Violence Education prevention programs and Community Capacity Building and continues to present Cultural Awareness Sessions to work places and community groups with our current client list including Courts Victoria, Dept of Justice, VACCA, Suicide Prevention Program – Western Plains Regional Development Inc, Parrawang Youth Arts, Dept of Health Human Services (Victoria).

Richard is a creative, One of Australia’s most experienced Aboriginal singer/songwriters, an author and a film maker, Richard is a proud Gunditjmara man who has worked as a Soldier, Fisherman, and Field Officer during the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. His work with the Royal Commission led to his appearance as presenter in the award winning Australian documentary Who Killed Malcolm Smith? Richard has written, directed and produced over fifty video, documentary and film projects including the award winning No Way to Forget, After Mabo, Harry’s War and The Convincing Ground documentaries.

Richard’s other awards and recognition include Victorian Regional Achievement & Community Awards nominations, Green Room nomination in the Category of Theatre Companies for Best Production and Best Ensemble for Walking into the Bigness which has since been published by Currency Press (2017). Richard is also an acclaimed musician whose music features on the soundtracks to many of his films.

Professor Vanessa Lemm

Professor Vanessa Lemm is the Executive Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University. As Executive Dean she is a member of the University Executive and leads the Faculty of Arts and Education which includes the School of Communication and Creative Arts, School of Education, School of Humanities and Social Sciences as well as the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation and the National Indigenous Knowledges Education Research Innovation Institute.

Workshops being held at the 2022 Reconnecting Conference

Session 1 - Friday 4th February - 1.15pm

Is research still a colonial practice?

Professor Mark Rose,  Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indigenous Strategy and Innovation

In this session Professor Mark Rose will share the background to writing his seminal article The silent apartheid, and engage participants in critically considering even the smallest ways in which they can decanter their research thinking and practice to contribute to research cultures that reflect first people’s first approaches

What Examiners look for

Associate Professor Trace Ollis, Senior Lecturer in Education (Applied Learning) , School of Education

This workshop focusses on the final stage of the PhD process and draws on current research on what examiners’ look for when they are marking a PhD (Golding et al, (2014).

Examiners want research students to be successful and they generally go in to the examination process with good will, they want the student to pass, but there are also certain requirements they expect the student to meet. This workshop introduces students to the elements that are necessary to ensure a PhD has the epistemological, theoretical and methodological rigour for a successful examination. It explores what making a 'contribution to knowledge' means and discusses issues such as the use of quality writing, tone and researcher voice in the final thesis. This workshop is a must for all research students who are in the mid to final stages of candidature.

The exegesis in Creative Research

Professor David McCooey, Personal Chair (Writing and Literature) and Dr Olivia Millard, Senior Lecturer in Art and Performance, School of Communication and Creative Arts

The exegesis is often a source of confusion and anxiety for HDR candidates undertaking creative research. This workshop will help you understand the different models of exegesis, and the ways in which the exegesis relates (both practically and theoretically) to the creative artefact.

Analysis, results and knowledge: Messy to neat?

Provocation by Associate Professor Juli Lynch, Associate Professor of Education (Pedagogy and Curriculum), School of Education
Discussants:
Dr Joanna Cruickshank, Senior Lecturer in History, School of Humanities and Social Sciences
Dr Glenn Auld, Senior Lecturer in Education (Language and Literacy), School of Education
Dr Anne Wilson, Senior Lecturer Art and Performance, School of Communication and Creative Arts

Mid-candidature usually involves moving from 'analysis' to 'results' to 'claims to knowledge'. Different approaches to this work will be considered in this session, together with how theory-methodology interactions can suggest a way forward. Participants will have an opportunity to share their own ideas and approaches.

Year 1 of your PhD – Towards Confirmation

Dr Maree Pardy, Senior Lecturer, International and Community Development, School of Humanities and Social Science

Elements of a research project - Problem, Questions, Literature and Approach

My Ethics Application

Miss Rhiannon Clanchy, Human Research Ethics & Integrity Adviser,  Deakin Research Integrity

This session will briefly introduce the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (updated 2018), describe the types of ethics applications and ethics review at Deakin, provide useful tips on how to avoid some common pitfalls and outline where to seek help for human research ethics questions.

The Structure of Argument

Associate Professor George Duke, Associate Professor in Philosophy, School of Humanities and Social Science

This session will cover the central principles of good argumentation.  It will allow you to identify the structure of successful arguments and also to spot some of the most common logical fallacies.  This will be a practical workshop, so please bring pen and paper or laptop.

Session 2 - Friday 4th February - 2.30pm

Developing and evidencing skills during your HDR candidature

Dr Daniela Kaleva, Program Manager, Researcher Development, Graduate Research Academy

Strategize your research and career progress by learning how to plan, access and evidence your
skills!
Purposefully selecting opportunities to develop skills throughout your candidature will assist you to gain experience, build evidence of your capabilities and fill identified skills gaps during your candidature. This workshop will explore different types of skills, how to plan skills development and opportunities for skills development that are available to you within Deakin and externally.

Does Anyone Know What You Did Last Summer?: Harnessing Social Media as a Researcher

Dr Adam Brown, Senior Lecturer in Communication and Ms Emily Wade, Lecturer in Communication, School of Communication and Creative Arts

How do you make your research - and yourself - visible in a post-Covid world? The notion of ‘publish of perish’ has long been joined by the phrase ‘be visible or vanish’, and this isn’t just for fancy alliteration. This presentation will explore what it means to build an online presence, network, and portfolio while undertaking a PhD. From making invaluable contacts on Twitter and LinkedIn, to keeping yourself motivated and open to feedback by dabbling in some media-making, we’ll be guided by your passions in this interactive and hands-on session. Bring your phone (like we needed to mention it... ;)

From PhD to Post Doc

Dr Luci Pangrazio, Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Language and Literacy, School of Education

This workshop session will explore pathways leading from a PhD into employment and other career opportunities. Covering both academic and industry possibilities we will discuss the importance of building your individual career ‘narrative’. Please bring any documents such as your CV or a research proposal that would be useful to share and receive feedback on.

Value adding: What DUSA can add to your PhD experience?

Ms Georgia Harris, DUSA Senior Advocate

The HDR journey can be a growth experience, it can shape you as a student and deliver the achievement of being an expert in your field of study.  How can DUSA add to your PhD experience?  This presentation will provide an overview of the support and advice we can offer, which includes both academic and welfare support opportunities.

How to get your work published and read

Dr Lucinda McKnight, Senior Lecturer in Education (Pedagogy and Curriculum), School of Education and Ms Amy Sellers, Liaison Librarian, Client Services

This presentation covers both how to successfully and strategically publish your work, and also how to promote it so that it is actually read and makes a difference in the world. Lucinda and Amy have worked together since Lucinda was a PhD student at Deakin, and offer a practical account of how collaboration can lead to great outcomes, both in terms of publication and creating an academic profile and social media presence targeted at a range of career directions

Saturday 5th February - 1.00pm

Hitchhikers Guide to 21st century Survey Results

Professor Andrew Singleton, Associate Head of School (Research),  School of Humanities and Social Sciences

This session is an introduction to the latest innovations and developments in survey research. It is intended as a primer for those interested in incorporating some statistics (primary or secondary) into their research, or for those who want to find out more about the state of the field. The presentation will cover: problems with traditional opinion polls; the adequacy of online surveys and survey panels; and innovations in data analysis and data visualisation. No prior knowledge or mathematical ability required! Suitable for students in all disciplines.

Progressing Creative Research with Methodology

Professor Stefan Greuter, Professor in Design, School of Communication and Creative Arts

Methodology is the central and most crucial aspect of any research endeavor. This workshop will provide an overview of defining research problems, framing research questions, formulation of hypothesis, exploring data sources, data collection
methods and tools and data analysis techniques.

Researching with others: Keys to collaboration

Professor Katya Johanson, Professor in Audience Research, School of Communications and Creative Arts and Professor Hilary Glow, Professor in Arts and Cultural Management, Deakin Business School

While a PhD in arts, education and humanities is still often a singular, solitary production, it is the beginning of a research career that is inevitably highly collaborative. The many benefits of research collaboration include increasing your productivity and the robustness of your research, expanding your networks and reputation, and finding more stimulation and enjoyment in the work you do. But coming straight from a PhD, it is often difficult to know how to start a collaboration. This session discusses how to start thinking collaboratively about your research. Katya and Hilary will discuss how to build productive relationships with your research participants and stakeholders, peers and colleagues at different levels of seniority.

Writing the Abstract: A short writing workshop

Dr Joanne O’Mara, Associate Professor of Language and Literature Education, School  of Education

Abstracts are short texts that contain the argument of your thesis. Rather than leave it until the thesis is finished, abstracts are short texts that can be drafted and built on through the process. In this workshop we draw on the work of Kamler and Thomson (De-Tox Your Writing 2016) to examine the construction of thesis abstracts. We’ll draft our own aspirational thesis abstract—all in an hour!

Digital Research Methodologies

Dr Earvin Cabalquinto, Lecturer in Communication, School of Communication and Creative Arts and  member of the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation

How do we approach and analyse a research participant’s digital lifeworld? What innovative methods can we explore to generate rich and critical data? What are the ethical considerations in designing our research methods? How do we manage unexpected scenarios during our fieldwork? Drawing upon my expertise on using digital media research methods in migration and mobilities research, I offer practical tips on addressing these inquiries.

Settler Researchers and first nations participants and histories

Associate Professor Emily Potter, Associate Professor in Writing and Literature, School of Communication and Creative Arts and Associate Professor Tiffany Shellam, Associate Professor in History, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

This session will consider questions of collaboration, consultation and other modes of ethical practice that come to the fore when non-indigenous researchers undertake projects with Indigenous communities and that concern Indigenous subjects. We will talk through our own experiences from the disciplinary frameworks of History and Literary Studies and invite students to reflect on their own projects, practices, and protocols.

Storytelling in the Thesis: Using your Voice to Create a Compelling Research Narrative

Dr Donna-Lee Frieze and Dr Kate Hall, Faculty Graduate Academic Skills Advisors, Research Services Portfolio

All research tells a story and yours will contribute to the multitude of different narratives in your field. We consider ways to find your voice and deploy it with clarity as you add your voice to existing discourses. We demonstrate how researcher positioning emerges from this process and workshop ways to tell your own story.

Reading Groups

Saturday 5th February - 9.30am

Dark Social Studies: Critical perspectives on AI

Associate Professor Toija  Cinque,  Senior Lecturer in Communication, School of Communication and Creative Arts

Algorithms, big and small data are today shaping our sociocultural and technical relations and our everyday experiences. Digital culture and communication are inevitably changing as media infrastructures, media practices and social environments become increasingly datafied while machines are beginning to realize people’s emotions and thoughts. This reading group
critically examines how these changes affect our cultural, social and emotional lives and the pressures and opportunities occasioned by reconfiguring social connection, specifically:
· What are the consequences of using algorithms and big data to represent the digital identity?
· What if technology could help improve conversations online?
· What are the societal implications of a world that has been customized to reflect our interests?
· What happens when the data used to train AI is biased and/or old?
· What value is provided for homes or businesses connected by ‘smart’ technology?

Readings

  • Cinque, T. (2021). ‘The Darker Turn of Intimate Machines: Dark Webs and (Post)Social
    Media’ in The Dark Social: Online Practices of Resistance, Motility and Power, Continuum
    Special Edition, Vol.,35(5), pp 679-691. The article is published open access and available via
  • Verdegem, P. (ed) (2021). ‘Introduction: Why We Need Critical Perspectives on AI’, in AI for
    Everyone? Critical Perspectives, London, University of Westminster Press, pp 1-18. The book is
    published open access and available via

Polluted/ polluting young people

Dr Eve Mayes,  Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Education

This reading group will consider the onto-epistemological, political and methodological perplexities and possibilities of undertaking research related to children and young people and planetary pollution. The group will explore some of the potential affordances of using ‘post-’ theories and methodologies to ‘decentre’ the child amidst the climate crisis, as well as explore some critiques of the politics and ethics of these theories and methodologies (Kraftl, 2020). Reading Leboirin (2021), the group will discuss anticolonial enactments of non-innocent care in research on colonised Country.

Readings:

  • Kraftl, P. (2020). After Childhood: Re-Thinking Environment, Materiality and Media in Children's Lives. [Chapter 2: Childhood Studies, after childhood (pp. 20-34)] London & New York: Routledge. [NOTE: References are a separate chapter to download.]
  • Leboirin, M. (2021). Pollution is Colonialism. [Chapter 3: An Anti-Colonial Pollution Science) (pp. 113-156)] London & New York: Duke University Press.

What are some creative ways of presenting the discussion?

Dr Glenn Auld, Senior Lecturer in Education (Language and Literacy), School of Education

The difference between the finding(s) and discussion chapters is often confusing for students. In this reading group we will explore the structure of the discussion chapter and some strategies to write it. We will look back your analysis and forward to you conclusion. We will consider the following questions: How is the discussion chapter different to the findings chapter(s)? What questions can I ask to guide writing my discussion? What are some creative ways of presenting the discussion?

Reading:

  • Evans, D., Gruba, P., & Zobel, J. (2014). The Discussion or Interpretation. In D. Evans, P. Gruba, & J. Zobel (Eds.), How to Write a Better Thesis (pp. 113-119). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04286-2_9

The power and politics of time

Dr Marilyn Stendera,  Lecturer in Philosophy, School of Humanities and Social Science

Humans are thoroughly temporal creatures: Our lives are shaped by memory and anticipation, the need to act at the right moment, the feeling of events going by too fast or too slowly. As graduate researchers, you probably have a particularly intense experience of this, with milestones and deadlines and the worry that there is somehow both too much and not enough time. But what exactly is this pervasive yet elusive thing? In this reading group, we’re going to take a short tour through a range of different attempts to grapple with this question and, crucially, its political implications. Time, as we will see, is not neutral; the ways in which we conceptualise, inhabit and relate to it are deeply shaped by power structures – and can also generate opportunities for uncovering, interrogating and resisting the latter. Some of the questions we will explore include:

  • What do we mean when we’re talking about time, especially in our work – natural time, lived time, clock time, social time? What are the relationships between these temporal registers?
  • Whose time are we talking about? Are we – implicitly or explicitly – adopting particular temporal frameworks or hegemonies? How can this impact our research?
  • How do the power structures that we inhabit shape our experience of time? How can reflecting on these temporal imaginaries open up opportunities for critique?
  • How does time feature in and operate in your project and your self-understanding as a researcher?

Readings:

The animal body in the politics of capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy

Dr Yamini Narayanan, Senior Lecturer in International and Community Development, School of Humanities and Social Science

Much of our research in the humanities and social sciences is focussed on the layered, intricate and often combined oppressions of capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy. As scholars, we are on an ongoing quest to understand the various ways in which this assemblage of capitalism-colonialism-patriarchy continues to pervade contemporary lives globally; as such, we are concerned with complicating and attending to new ideas of complicity and solidarity through the lens of different subaltern politics. This session asks – what comes to light when the animal body is the prism through which the assemblage of capitalism-colonialism-patriarchy is examined? The animal body – and particularly the farmed animal body – is so ubiquitous in everyday human life as to be virtually unseeable, except perhaps in thoroughly objectified and commodified forms. This session explores the idea that interrogating species as a political category enables a fuller understanding of the ways in which capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy operate. Focussing on the farmed animal body, this session explores this configuration in two distinct geographies – the settler-colonial context of the United States, and the contemporary politics of Hindu fascism in postcolonial India.

Readings:

Cultural Politics and the Authoritarian Personality: What Is Authoritarian Culture?

Associate Professor Geoff Boucher, Associate Professor of Writing and Literature, School of Communication and Creative Arts

Gamergate. Puppygate. QAnon. The Capitol Riot. Armed rightwing militias and the survivalist or second civil war literature that feeds the destructive imagination. Anti-lockdown "freedom" rallies. Conspiracy theories. The explosive growth of authoritarian micro-parties who hide their prejudicial ideologies behind libertarian slogans. Authoritarian populism as a political virus. And this is not just America--it's here too; and elsewhere.

What can arts and humanities researchers who are committed to democratic citizenship, human rights and cultural tolerance do about all of this? Well, understanding it would be a good start. This reading group is about making a start on that task. It is also about, more broadly, the methodological and substantive questions of how best to think about cultural politics.

We'll begin by looking at the authoritarian personality, via an article on Bob Altemeyer's "rightwing authoritarianism" test scale. That's a light-hearted piece (not!!), but it is not a challenging read:

The, we will have a look at the political expression of the authoritarian personality, noticing its distinctively "cultural" turn, the way that culture wars flow naturally from the proposed positions.

I apologise (not really!) for not setting the full-throated madness of a completely explicit racist and sexist, white supremacist and masculine domination, diatribe. But I don't actually want to damage anyone. De Benoist and Champetier are important, because they show how today's more sophisticated authoritarian right conceals prejudice behind libertarian phrases and the rhetoric of cultural difference.

Against this background, we'll have a look at an authoritarian fiction. It won't be anything sickening (at least, not at the level of manifest content), so Mike Ma or Matthew Bracken or The Turner Diaries are off the table. Instead, we'll read a harmless little story about elves--what could possibly go wrong (except for the fact that the author is a neo-Nazi)?

Readings:

  • Bob Altemeyer, "Highly Dominating, Highly Authoritarian Personalities," The Journal of Social Psychology 144(4): pp. 421-448.
  • Alain de Benoist and Charles Champetier, Manifesto for a European Renaissance (London: Arktos; 2012), pp. 11-47.
  • Vox Day, from Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy (Arktos, London, 2019). A short story from the collection, of no more than 12-20 pages.

Decolonising Cultural Heritage: Challenges, Opportunities, Limitations

Dr Jason Gibson,  Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Alfred Deakin Institute

This reading group will critically engage with theories of decolonisation in relation Indigenous cultural heritage collections and archives in Australia. We will critically examine the political objectives and theoretical origins of decolonisation and think critically about its prospects for transformative change/s in the cultural heritage and museum sector. By scrutinising the making of museum collections, the diversity of Indigenous experiences with collectors and the repatriation/return of collections back into communities, we will think broadly about future of museum and source community relationships into the future.

Readings

  • Morphy, H. “Different Locals: Reflections on Indigenous Australian Collections.” Museums, Infinity and the Culture of Protocols: Ethnographic Collections and Source Communities. Routledge, London, 2020, pp.26-51
  • Dan, Hicks. “Necrography.” The Brutish Museums: The Benin Bronzes, Colonial Violence and Cultural Restitution, Pluto Press, 2020, pp. 25–36, https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctv18msmcr.7

Critical Policy Scholarship

Dr Tebeje Molla Mekonnen, DECRA Research Fellow, School of Education

In this reading group, participants will start with reflections on the theoretical foundations of critical policy research. Then they will explore methodological assumptions, analytical goals, and shifts in empirical contexts of critical policy inquiry. The discussion will be guided by the following questions:

  • What is ‘critical’ about critical policy scholarship?
  • Is objectivity attainable/desirable in policy research?
  • Why is reflexive positionality important in critical policy analysis?

Reading

Materiality and Us

Dr Lienors Torre

The visible matter we recognise forms a very small part of the universe and yet it forms the basis of our world and ourselves. This materiality is also in constant flux. This reading group explores the implication of material objects and how we view them upon our consciousness and identity.

Readings

  • How to be Animal: A New History of What it Means to be Human by Melanie Challenger, Chapter 3. The Civil War of the Mind pg73-142
  • The Craftsman by Richard Sennett Chapter 4. Material Consciousness pg119-146

3MT Competition

HDR students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis topic and its significance in language appropriate to an intelligent but non-specialist audience. This is am invaluable opportunity to practice your communication skills in a supportive environment and it gives you the chance to distill the essence of your research into a succinct and engaging sound bite. If you win, you will be the Faculty's representative in the University 3MT later in the year, then onto the Asia/Pacific finals.

Rules

  • A single PowerPoint slide is permitted (no slide transitions are permitted)
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, instruments, musical, laboratory etc.) are permitted
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum. Competitors exceeding 3 minutes will be disqualified
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final

Prizes:

  • Winner - $500
  • Runner -Up - $250
  • "The Andrea Gallant Encouragement Award" - People's choice - $250

Please register via the registration link and request the entry form, by emailing Margaret McKay, prior to the Reconnecting Conference. No entries will be taken on the day

Poster Presentations

PURPOSES
* To educate others about your research findings;
* To get feedback/critique from peers before submitting a manuscript for publication;
* To network with other scholars who are interested in the same research

Prizes for Poster presentations will be:

* $250 for Best Poster presentation

* $100 for 2 x Runner-up

The Faculty provides funding up to $100  to assist with expenses in the preparation of posters.  This can be claimed by uploading the 2022 Reconnecting Conference Reimbursement Application form and the associated receipts into Deakin UniFi.

Poster Presentation tips

Student Presentations

All candidates are invited to do a presentation on their thesis.  This presentation is 15 minutes duration, with 5 minutes at the end for questions and answers.  Please indicate in the registration form if you will be doing a presentation.  The 500 word abstract need to be submitted to artsed-hdr@deakin.edu.au by no later than Tuesday 21 December  2021.

Enquiries

Lisa Morwood, Kylie Koulkoudinas and Margaret McKay
Email: artsed-hdr@deakin.edu.au

Reimbursements

Reimbursements can be applied for after the 2022 Reconnecting Conference, by uploading the 2022 Reconnecting Conference Reimbursement Application form and the associated receipts into Deakin UniFi.

Guidelines

TRAVEL:

  • Travel will only be reimbursed for candidates.
  • Travel will only be reimbursed for Victorian remote and interstate candidates.
  • Candidates based in Geelong and Melbourne cannot claim travel reimbursement.
  • Claims are accepted for bus or train fares and private vehicle (65¢ per kilometre) up to a maximum of $300.
  • Taxi fares and hire car expenses will not be reimbursed
  • Airfares will not be reimbursed

ACCOMMODATION:

  • Victorian remote and Melbourne based candidates – 1 night up to a maximum of $200.
  • Interstate candidates – 2 nights up to a maximum of $200 per night
  • Breakfast, dinner and parking costs will not be reimbursed.

RECEIPTS:

  • receipts relating to your expenditure must be loaded into Deakin UniFi with this claim form at the conclusion of the Reconnecting Conference.
  • ATM/EFTPOS receipts, bank statements, booking confirmations and unpaid invoices, will not be accepted.

Accommodation options

The following are some suggestions for accommodation close to the Waterfront campus.

  • Rydges Geelong - Corner Gheringhap & Myers Street Geelong (03) 5223 6200
  • R Hotel Geelong -  10 Bellerine Street, Geelong -  (03) 4206 0500
  • Admiralty Inn - 66 McKillop Street, Geelong - (03)  5221 4288
  • Best Western Geelong Motor Inn - 30 Keera Street Geelong - (03) 5224 4777
  • Quest Geelong - 16 - 18 The Esplanade South - (03) 5228 2000
  • Belmercer Motel - 12 - 14 Mercer Street, Geelong - (03) 5229 9021

The use of shared accommodation services and hostels requires travellers to accept all responsibility for personal risk and safety. It is expected that travellers carry out appropriate due diligence before departure and/or on arrival which includes:

1.Providing a copy of the shared accommodation services commercial Public Liability Insurance for fee paying guests;

2.Evidencing that the property provides a safe and secure environment and is in a safe neighbourhood;

3.Privacy: the property gives the traveller the opportunity for a private environment.

If booking Airbnb please check with the Airbnb host that they have access to, and coverage under, the Host Insurance Program and that you have undertaken your own due diligence as per the above points 2 and 3 to ensure that the property is safe and the hosts are trustworthy.

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