HDR Spring School

Spring School is an opportunity for Faculty of Arts and Education Higher Degree by Research candidates to immerse themselves in a rich research environment and will be held Friday 1 October 2021.

About Spring School

Spring School is an opportunity for Faculty of Arts and Education Higher Degree by Research candidates to immerse themselves in a rich research environment and network with peers.

Registrations are taken on a first come basis (registrations are date and time stamped when received) and Winter School is capped at 70 attendees, due to COVID and room capacity restrictions.  Registrations will be open for a 7 day period unless capacity is reached prior. Once capacity numbers have been reached a waiting list will be kept and offers made if a place becomes available.

Candidates must sign up for workshops at the time of registration

Program Information

9.00am – 9.40am

Registration and morning tea

9.40am – 10.10am

Welcome to Country and Opening Presentation

Professor Mark Rose -  Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indigenous Strategy and Innovation

10.10am – 10.30am

Welcome

Professor Vanessa Lemm – Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts and Education

10.30am – 10.40am

Professor Andrea Witcomb – Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Arts and Education

10.45am – 12.00

Workshops – Session 1


Pathways within and beyond Academic

Dr Mary Iliadis, Dr Laura Bedford, Dr Monique Mann

The aim of the presentation is to foster critical thinking among the HDR cohort about possibilities and pathways within and beyond the academy.


Thesis Examination - What Examiners Look for

Dr Trace Ollis

This workshop focusses on the final stage of the PhD process and draws on current research on what examiners’ look for when they are marking a PhD (Golding et al, (2014). Examiners want research students to be successful and they generally go in to the examination process with good will, they want the student to pass, but there are also certain requirements they expect the student to meet. This workshop introduces students to the elements that are necessary to ensure a PhD has the epistemological, theoretical and methodological rigour for a successful examination. It explores what making a 'contribution to knowledge' means and discusses issues such as the use of quality writing, tone and researcher voice in the final thesis. This workshop is a must for all research students who are in the mid to final stages of candidature.


How to get published… and read: Get your work out there successfully and strategically

Dr Lucinda McKnight and Amy Sellars

This presentation covers both how to successfully and strategically publish your work, and also how to promote it so that it is actually read and makes a difference in the world.

Lucinda and Amy have worked together since Lucinda was a PhD student at Deakin, and offer a practical account of how collaboration can lead to great outcomes, both in terms of publication and creating an academic profile and social media presence targeted at a range of career directions.


Structure of a Literature Review

Associate Professor Andrew Skourdoumbis

The notion of mapping the field; The idea of finding a ‘gap’ in the literature; How a LR is directed at answering the major research question; How a LR is about setting up an argument focusing on what is important; highlighting important debates and disagreements about the problem under study and discussing the various theories or theory that informs the various views or major view taken and identifying what the silences are. The workshop will work with candidates to illustrate the nature of how a LR is about providing aspects of the theoretical framework setting up the particular view or explanation of the world or of individuals and how it works in order to produce knowledge about the problem under study

12.00 – 1.30pm

Lunch – large games mobile massage

1.30pm – 3.00pm

Workshops – Session 2


Impact and engagement: the new research endeavour…

Dr Peta White and Alfred Deakin Professor Russell Tytler

It used to be that just getting published was the aim of the game. Now, however the goal posts have shifted and we aspire towards collecting evidence of how our research has impact through

broader community engagement. Why has this shift occurred and how do we do it? Peta and Russell have been involved in a couple of research projects that have attended to developing impact and they now design their research differently. In this workshop they will unpack some strategies for planning research for impact and engagement.


Allyship and Decolonial Research Practices: being not Indigenous and not queer in First Peoples and LGBTIQA+ research

Dr Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli

In this workshop, with practical examples from academia, advocacy and activism, we will explore theories, methods and debates regarding decolonial research, such as the work of Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Gilbert Valadez & Anne Rene Elsbree. We will also explore what it means to be an ally, and what it does not mean. The work of Clare Land and Jen Margaret, Rachel McKinnon and Beverley D'Angelo will be used to talk about Allies Behaving Badly, White Fragility and Being an Accomplice


Managing your thesis

Professor Andrea Witcomb

Don’t know how to manage the thesis writing?

This workshop will introduce you to an approach that will help you at the outset to structure your argument and work out what goes where. No longer will you feel lost, uncertain and or confused about how to approach this work.


Your Confirmation

Dr Donna Frieze and Dr Kate Hall

This workshop will guide you through the stages of confirmation. We will discuss its components, the format of your written document, expectations of your panel and dissect examples of confirmation documents. In addition, we will discuss tips regarding your public confirmation presentation and will role-play a realistic scenario regarding your private panel.

3.00pm – 4.30pm

Whole group activity - speed thesis

4.30pm – 5.30pm

Drinks and Nibbles

Keynote speaker

Professor Vanessa Lemm, Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts and Education, will open the 2021 Spring School

Vanessa Lemm, Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts and Education

Workshops for Spring School

Pathways within and beyond Academic

Dr Mary Iliadis, Dr Laura Bedford, Dr Monique Mann

The aim of the presentation is to foster critical thinking among the HDR cohort about possibilities and pathways within and beyond the academy.

Structure of a Literature Review

Associate Professor Andrew Skourdoumbis

The notion of mapping the field; The idea of finding a ‘gap’ in the literature; How a LR is directed at answering the major research question; How a LR is about setting up an argument focusing on what is important; highlighting important debates and disagreements about the problem under study and discussing the various theories or theory that informs the various views or major view taken and identifying what the silences are. The workshop will work with candidates to illustrate the nature of how a LR is about providing aspects of the theoretical framework setting up the particular view or explanation of the world or of individuals and how it works in order to produce knowledge about the problem under study

Thesis Examination - What Examiners Look for

Dr Trace Ollis

This workshop focusses on the final stage of the PhD process and draws on current research on what examiners’ look for when they are marking a PhD (Golding et al, (2014). Examiners want research students to be successful and they generally go in to the examination process with good will, they want the student to pass, but there are also certain requirements they expect the student to meet. This workshop introduces students to the elements that are necessary to ensure a PhD has the epistemological, theoretical and methodological rigour for a successful examination. It explores what making a 'contribution to knowledge' means and discusses issues such as the use of quality writing, tone and researcher voice in the final thesis. This workshop is a must for all research students who are in the mid  to final stages of candidature.

How to get published… and read: Get your work out there successfully and strategically

Dr Lucinda McKnight and Amy Sellars

This presentation covers both how to successfully and strategically publish your work, and also how to promote it so that it is actually read and makes a difference in the world.

Lucinda and Amy have worked together since Lucinda was a PhD student at Deakin, and offer a practical account of how collaboration can lead to great outcomes, both in terms of publication and creating an academic profile and social media presence targeted at a range of career directions.

Your Confirmation

Dr Donna Frieze and Dr Kate Hall

This workshop will guide you through the stages of confirmation. We will discuss its components, the format of your written document, expectations of your panel and dissect examples of confirmation documents. In addition, we will discuss tips regarding your public confirmation presentation and will role-play a realistic scenario regarding your private panel.

Managing your thesis

Professor Andrea Witcomb

Don’t know how to manage the thesis writing?

This workshop will introduce you to an approach that will help you at the outset to structure your argument and work out what goes where. No longer will you feel lost, uncertain and or confused about how to approach this work.

Impact and engagement: the new research endeavour…

Dr Peta White and Alfred Deakin Professor Russell Tytler

It used to be that just getting published was the aim of the game. Now, however the goal posts have shifted and we aspire towards collecting evidence of how our research has impact through broader community engagement. Why has this shift occurred and how do we do it? Peta and Russell have been involved in a couple of research projects that have attended to developing impact and they now design their research differently. In this workshop they will unpack some strategies for planning research for impact and engagement.

Allyship and Decolonial Research Practices: being not Indigenous and not queer in First Peoples and LGBTIQA+ research

Dr Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli

In this workshop, with practical examples from academia, advocacy and activism, we will explore theories, methods and debates regarding decolonial research, such as the work of Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Gilbert Valadez & Anne Rene Elsbree. We will also explore what it means to be an ally, and what it does not mean. The work of Clare Land and Jen Margaret, Rachel McKinnon and Beverley D'Angelo will be used to talk about Allies Behaving Badly, White Fragility and Being an Accomplice..

Enquiries

Lisa Morwood and Kylie Koulkoudinas
Senior HDR Advisors
Faculty of Arts and Education
Deakin University
Locked Bag 20000
Geelong VIC 3220


Email: artsed-hdr@deakin.edu.au

Registration

Registrations will be opening soon and an email with registration details will be sent to all candidates.

Reimbursements

The Faculty isn't reimbursing travel or accommodation expenses for the 2021 Spring School

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