HDR Summer School

Summer School is an opportunity for Faculty of Arts and Education Higher Degree by Research candidates to immerse themselves in a rich research environment.

7-9 February 2020

Deakin University Geelong Waterfront Campus

About Summer School

Summer School is an opportunity for Faculty of Arts and Education Higher Degree by Research candidates to immerse themselves in a rich research environment from Friday morning until Sunday lunch time.

Late phase candidates will be invited to undertake a 20 minute presentation.  Interest in presenting is to be included with your registration.

The poster session is open to all candidates to showcase their work. A poster presentation provides a forum to share your work with the colleagues who are most interested in your field of research. There will be prizes awarded to the "Best Poster Presentation" as judged by a panel of academics and a "People's Choice" prize as judged by all Summer School attendees, this year.  You can download tips for assisting with your poster presentation. (PDF, 149.9 KB)

Communication and Creative Arts students are encouraged to register to exhibit some of their work but it must be easily transportable, not take up too much space and managed entirely by the student, please contact the Faculty Office for further information.

The Faculty 3MT competition will be held and entry for this will be on the registration page.

Candidates must sign up for workshops and reading groups at the time of registration.

Program Information

The program is now online to review.  Registrations are taken on a first come basis (registrations are date and time stamped when received) and Summer School is capped at 160 attendees.  Registrations will be open for a 3 week period unless capacity is reached prior.  Once capacity numbers have been reached a waiting list will be kept and offers made if a place becomes available.

Keynote speaker

Professor Raewyn Connell - Friday 7 February 10.30am - Costa Lecture Theatre

Raewyn Connell is Professor Emerita, University of Sydney, and Life Member of the National Tertiary Education Union.  She has taught in several countries and is a widely-cited sociological researcher.  Her recent books include The Good University; Gênero em termos reais; and Gender in World Perspective (with Rebecca Pearse). Her work has been translated into nineteen languages. Raewyn has been active in the labour movement, the peace movement, and work for gender equality. Details at www.raewynconnell.net and Twitter @raewynconnell.

Mr Wayne Schwass - Sunday 9 February - 10.00am - Costa Lecture Theatre

Since capturing Australia’s attention as one of the most successful football players in AFL history, Wayne Schwass has gone on to make a name for himself in more ways than one.  Born in New Zealand and raised in Warrnambool, Western Victoria, Wayne Schwass began playing Aussie Rules football at the age of ten. But with his undeniable talent and passion, it was not long before he was recruited to join the AFL— so in 1986, Wayne began playing for the North Melbourne Football Club.  Wayne went from strength to strength, quickly becoming one of the most highly-rated players in AFL history. Wayne played 282 games at the elite level for fourteen and a half years, both with the North Melbourne Football Club (1988- 1997) and the Sydney Swans (1998-2002). Since retiring in 2002, Wayne has established himself as a highly respected AFL broadcaster on TV, radio, print and online. However, in addition to his work within the sporting world, Wayne has also become a passionate advocate for mental health awareness.  Wayne’s passion for health and wellbeing ultimately drew him back to mental health advocacy—and it was this same passion that led him to create ‘Puka Up’. Launched in 2017, Puka Up is a social enterprise focusing on mental health, emotional wellbeing and, importantly, suicide prevention. According to Wayne, the PukaUp vision is to ‘create the environments for every person to have authentic and genuine conversations about mental health and emotional wellbeing’.

Accommodation

Accommodation can be requested with your registration and is for the room only and for a single person only. Once requested and booked there will be no alterations to bookings.  Any no shows or cancellations from 6 January 2020 will result in the accommodation cost being charged to candidates. If you wish to make your own accommodation arrangements please ensure you book as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. It is preferable to stay in the Geelong Waterfront area for easy access to the Waterfront campus. You can claim the accommodation only by submitting a Summer School reimbursement form post Summer School. There is a cap of $200 per night.

Workshops

Allocations to workshops will be on a first come first serve basis from the registration process. Once sessions are filled they will be removed from the available options on the registration page. It is expected that all Summer School attendees participate in the workshops.

Data Analysis

Associate Professor Andrea Gallant and Associate Professor Amanda Mooney

The Analysing Qualitative Data workshop is a hands on working session where you will be analysing pieces of your own raw data. You need to bring the following to the session;

1. A section of raw data and or analysed data

2. Analytical framework if they have designed one eg particularly those who have begun their analysis

3. Methodology

4. Research questions

This is a very practical session, we will focus on getting an analytical framework designed so you can take this to your supervisors to discuss and modify based on their input/advice. We will also get you to analyse some of your data (for those of you that have this) so that you can see what is working and where changes needs to be made to the analytical framework.

Designing and Managing your Thesis

Professor Andrea Witcomb

Don’t know how to manage the thesis writing? This workshop will introduce you to an approach that will help you at the outset to structure your argument and work out what goes where. No longer will you feel lost, uncertain and or confused about how to approach this work.

What Examiners Look For

Dr Trace Ollis

This workshop focuses on the final stage of the PhD process and draws on current research on what examiners look for when they are marking a PhD (Golding et al, (2014). Examiners want research students to be successful and they generally go into the examination process with good will, they want the student to pass. This workshop introduced students to the elements that are necessary to ensure a PhD has the epistemological, theoretical and methodological rigour to ensure success. It explores what making a 'contribution to knowledge' means and discusses issues such as the use of writing, tone and researcher voice in the final editorial process. This workshop is a must for all research students in the last stage of their PhD

Where to Publish

Research Librarians - Library Research Services team

Have you ever wondered how to find out more about a journal or publisher than what you can read on its website? Or what “Impact Factor”, “Q1 Journal” or “predatory publisher” means? Perhaps you need to know what to consider when publishing from your thesis? This workshop will answer all these questions and more, connecting you with the tools you need to make informed, strategic decisions about publishing your research.

  • Develop your publishing plan by addressing key questions about your goals, audience, and time line
  • Discover open access options and Deakin Research Online
  • Learn key approaches and tools to evaluate the quality and impact of scholarly publications
  • Who to contact for help?

Exegesis writing: trajectories of creative discovery

Dr Antonia Pont and Associate Professor Jondi Keane

This very practical session will address the integration of your project in both the theory and practice components and workshop your specific exegesis outline. What is your contribution to practice-knowledge and how will you say/approach it to invite a reader into what you have discovered over the course of the project? We will discuss how to think about the timeline of the writing in relation to the production of creative work and, based on your exegesis outlines, will run a series of exercises that address what will be discussed in each section and the thought/argument/proposition that maps out the trajectory of the exegesis. We will at all times track how the artefact and your exegetical work align.

Your Confirmation

Dr Donna Frieze and Dr Kate Hall

This workshop will guide you through the stages of confirmation. We will discuss its components, the format of your written document, expectations of your panel and dissect examples of confirmation documents. In addition, we will discuss tips regarding your public confirmation presentation and will role-play a realistic scenario regarding your private panel.

Critical Dis/ability Studies: A Reading Group and Workshop

Dr Kim Davies

Critical dis/ability studies* is an emerging cross-disciplinary field that questions the taken-for-granted nature (?) of ‘ability’ and ‘disability’ and their mundane but powerful effects in everyday life. In this connected sequence of Reading Group and Workshop, we will canvass the key pivot points in the trajectory of disability scholarship, from the early and formative definitional struggles differentiating ‘disability’ and ‘impairment’,  the disciplinary and culture wars waged between advocates of the Medical and Social models of disability, through Davis’ (1995) interrogation of normalcy and Campbell’s’(2009) naming of ableism to McCruer’s (2006) queer ‘cripping’ of compulsory ablebodiedness and recent engagements with postcolonialism (Mills, 2014; Soldatic & Grech, 2016) and affect theory (Goodley, Liddiard & Runswick Cole, 2017; Pluquailec, 2018).  In the follow-up Workshop, participants will take-up the conceptual framework developed in the Reading Group to collaboratively unpack popular media representations of ‘disability’, reflexively consider a personal artefact related to dis/ability and with support, identify ways that critical approaches to ‘ability’ can contribute to and enhance their own work and scholarship. The group will conclude with a collective guerrilla arts activity to undo our own dis/abilities. The Critical Dis/ability Studies Reading Group and Workshop will be of interest to scholars engaged in Humanities, Creative Arts and Social Sciences (including Education), and while most benefit will be gained from participation in both sessions,  the Reading Group and Workshop can be taken separately.

Editing Your Thesis

Dr Kate Hall

Arguably the most important of all the stages of writing, editing is what gives your work an edge. A polished thesis says a great deal about the research it contains, and careful editing can save you from needing to make post-examination revisions. This workshop offers hints and tips for incisive thesis editing, with a particular focus on structure, clarity, word choices, grammar and syntax, identifying and avoiding repetition, reference checking and more. Discover the differences between proofreading and editing, and why these are such crucial elements in clear and coherent writing. Information about faculty-approved editorial and proofreading services will also be provided.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Twenty-First Century Survey Research

Professor Andrew Singleton

This session is an introduction to the latest innovations and developments in survey research. It is intended as a primer for those interested in incorporating some statistics (primary or secondary) into their research, or for those who want to find out more about the state of the field. The presentation will cover: problems with traditional opinion polls; the adequacy of online surveys and survey panels; and innovations in data analysis and data visualisation. No prior knowledge or mathematical ability required! Suitable for students in all disciplines. Content warning: there will be some reference to donuts during the talk.

Making your research matter outside academia

Dr Helen Young

Scholars are increasingly being asked to do research that has an impact on outside their discipline and the academy. This workshop introduces key concepts and principles for designing and conducting engaged and impactful research.

Structure of Literature Review

Associate Professor Andrew Skourdoumbis

In this workshop candidates will be taken through major aspects of a Literature Review including: The notion of mapping the field; The idea of finding a ‘gap’ in the literature; How a LR is directed at answering the major research question; How a LR is about setting up an argument focusing on what is important; highlighting important debates and disagreements about the problem under study and discussing the various theories or theory that informs the various views or major view taken and identifying what the silences are. The workshop will work with candidates to illustrate the nature of how a LR is about providing aspects of the theoretical framework setting up the particular view or explanation of the world or of individuals and how it works in order to produce knowledge about the problem under study.

Reading Groups

Allocations to reading groups will be on a first come first serve basis from the registration process. Once groups are filled they will be removed from the available options on the registration page. It is expected that all Summer School attendees participate in the reading groups

The reading groups cover a range of different interests in small working groups. Each reading group has a theme and a short reading or readings that all participants are expected to have read prior to Summer School.  The readings will be sent out with the Summer School confirmation email.

Group 1 – Case Study Research Data as Poetry Text

Dr Trace Ollis and Dr Cheryl Ryan

In this session we explore the use of case study methodology and methods in education research, drawing on the work of Merriam (2009). We show some examples of how in-depth case studies are constructed from data, and how data can be used (as text) in the genre of poetry. The poems (as case studies) speak of adult learners’ experiences of returning to study after not having completed secondary school.

Group 2 – Critical Dis/ability Studies

Dr Kim Davies

Critical dis/ability studies* is an emerging cross-disciplinary field that questions the taken-for-granted nature (?) of ‘ability’ and ‘disability’ and their mundane but powerful effects in everyday life. In this connected sequence of Reading Group and Workshop, we will canvass the key pivot points in the trajectory of disability scholarship, from the early and formative definitional struggles differentiating ‘disability’ and ‘impairment’,  the disciplinary and culture wars waged between advocates of the Medical and Social models of disability, through Davis’ (1995) interrogation of normalcy and Campbell’s’(2009) naming of ableism to McCruer’s (2006) queer ‘cripping’ of compulsory ablebodiedness and recent engagements with postcolonialism (Mills, 2014; Soldatic & Grech, 2016) and affect theory (Goodley, Liddiard & Runswick Cole, 2017; Pluquailec, 2018).

In the follow-up Workshop, participants will take-up the conceptual framework developed in the Reading Group to collaboratively unpack popular media representations of ‘disability’, reflexively consider a personal artefact related to dis/ability and with support, identify ways that critical approaches to ‘ability’ can contribute to and enhance their own work and scholarship. The group will conclude with a collective guerrilla arts activity to undo our own dis/abilities.

The Critical Dis/ability Studies Reading Group and Workshop will be of interest to scholars engaged in Humanities, Creative Arts and Social Sciences (including Education), and while most benefit will be gained from participation in both sessions,  the Reading Group and Workshop can be taken separately.

Group 3 – The ‘Practice Turn’ in Social Science Research

Associate Professor Radhika Gorur

In recent years, there has been a ‘turn to practice’ in researching social change. But what does this mean and how is it done? What are some of the main ontological and methodological implications of using practice-based theories to research organisations, communities, policies, scientific practice and social situations? How are agency, power, action and change conceptualized in practice theories? In this reading group, we will explore some of the main underpinnings of practice theories and explore how they are used in a variety of different fields. We will discuss the epistemological implications and the politics of the ‘practice turn’ in research.

Group 4 - Approaching the Field: Exploring the Challenges of Ethics and the Power Dynamics between the Researcher and the Researched

Dr David Tittensor

This reading group will explore the challenges that the biomedical ethics model presents for both Anthropology and the wider social sciences when researchers are undertaking sensitive topics. Alongside this, the group will also examine the difficulties that arise when the power dynamic between the researcher and the researched is inverted. In doing so, alternative strategies will be discussed.

Group 5 -Trust and Moral Phenomenology

Associate Professor Patrick Stokes

Trust has been a pivotal topic from philosophy and psychology to politics and economics, yet with little agreement over its nature or value. One figure who centralises trust in his work, yet who has been until recently largely absent from these discussions, is the Danish philosopher K.E. Løgstrup (1905-81) currently enjoying something of a minor renaissance in Anglophone moral philosophy. In this session we’ll be exploring the chapter on trust in Løgstrup’s 1956 masterwork The Ethical Demand. Can trust really be more basic than distrust, as Løgstrup claims? Should trust have priority over distrust, or should we – as Alasdair MacIntyre has insisted – instead aim for an Aristotelian virtuous mean between credulity and suspicion?

Group 6 -Ethics and principles: a humanitarian perspective

Dr Nazanin Zadeh-Cummins

This reading group will examine Hugo Slim’s article on the four humanitarian principles: humanity, neutrality, impartiality, and solidarity. Though the article is rooted in humanitarian study and practice – Slim has extensive experience in both and is now Head of Policy at the International Committee of the Red Cross – it also engaged with wide-ranging topics including law, transnational relations, non-state actors, morality, psychology, and conflict studies. The group will begin by unpacking the four principles, with students invited to bring the perspectives of their own fields/experiences, and turn to the feasibility of Slim’s recommendations in the present day.

Group 7 – “Surveillance and Visibility.”

Dr Luke Heemsbergen

The Digital Prism (Flyverbom 2019) suggests that digital technologies and the surveillance they afford do not make the world more open and transparent. Instead, they intensify the need to consider what to make (in)visible and how to manage the visibility of ourselves and others. Visibility is a form of government that allows the world we live in to be seen and known in specific ways. This reading group will use a chapter from Flyverbom’s recent book to explore the issues that cross digital media and political control, as understood through the social category of visibility.

Group 8 -AR Dystopian Futures: InSight - What’s your Score?

Professor Sean Redmond

In the short film Sight (2012) we enter a near future world where AR apps shape and effect work, leisure, and sexual and romantic relationships. These apps - grafted into one’s eyeballs – transmit real-time ratings information as if life is a game that is played, and where status accrues from the scores one receives. In Sight human interactions become layered and levered by mirrored if invisible screens, so that self and selfhood are audited and impression managed. The question that Sight addresses, as does much of contemporary screen science fiction, is what happens to the human condition where the technologies of the self removes ones selfhood? In this session/workshop/seminar, we will watch and discuss Sight, drawing on the ideas of a set reading to help us explore this version of an AR dystopian future. What’s your score?

Group 9 - “What do you do with the “outsider” in your school!”

Professor Tarquam McKenna

Debate around inclusion of all people based on diversity policies is still happening. This session will focus on identifying the students and staff who are ‘othered’ in our schools and critique notions of only “one way” of belonging - especially in schools. These students are the ‘outliers’ but they have a truth to tell. These students are fringe dwellers but life circumstances might have prevailed that brought them to the fringe. The workshop will be limited to 15, experiential in process and product and draw on each attendees practice based engagement with an outlier to examine the stories of diversity and authentic acceptance.

Group 10 - "Self Focused Methodologies: Is it good research or just good therapy?"

Dr Peta White

Self-focused methodologies (such as self-study, autoethnography, collaborative autoethnography, autobiography, some participatory action research and many arts-based methodologies etc.) can be powerful tools for inquiry around practice (especially social pursuits such as teaching, nursing, activism…). I have found that through self-focused methodologies I can ask more of myself than I can ask of others. I can push myself to go deeper, reveal more, and develop greater insight. These methodologies are useful to clarify our understanding of our self, our practice, and, if framed through critical theory, to bring about change in our practice or the practice of others. As an environmental activist I believe that you can only change yourself, so researching with methodologies that align with this philosophy feels comfortable yet empowering. Of course, these methodologies rarely tell only your story, so there are ethical implications to this research, we will explore these. And our views/reflections/ideas are often best mediated through the lens of others so we will also discuss the implications of using critical friends as a research method – to keep us honest and open. However, not everyone shares this comfort with self-focused methodologies. How do you tackle the question - Is it good research or just good therapy? In this reading group we will unpack some methodologies that are self-focused and explore how they are good research (and maybe good therapy too).

Group 11 - The dynamic of the slow

Dr Rosemary Woodcock

Climate action presupposes associated juris-political activity as a matter of urgency. Yet we/they/those who could are slow to act. Rather than ‘slow’ be associated necessarily with a form of ‘inaction’, is there a particular dynamic (a core energy, power, agency, intelligence) within slowness? Creative practice is slow in process and in its unfolding. What can we draw from this? What should we do?

Group 12 - Queer Phenomenology, Sara Ahmed

Dr Rea Dennis

A chance to engage with Ahmed’s unique capacity to re-orient, disorient and critique complacency in expressive language, cultural practices and experience. Gets some fresh eyes for your research journey.

Papers

Call for Expressions of Interest in Presenting: Presentations for 2020 will again be restricted to late phase candidates in the first instance and then candidates who have completed their data collection who are in a position to present (preliminary) findings.

Presenters will have 30 minutes (20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions).

Submissions should take the form of a 250 word abstract and must be emailed to artsed-research@deakin.edu.au by 22 November 2019.

Enquiries

Lisa Morwood
Senior HDR Advisor
Faculty of Arts and Education
Deakin University
Locked Bag 20000
Geelong VIC 3220

Ph +61 3 522 71254
Email: artsed-research@deakin.edu.au

Registration

Reimbursements

Reimbursements will be processed as soon as possible after Summer School. Reimbursement requests must be lodged on Deakin UniFi by no later than Friday 13 March 2020. You must upload the Summer School reimbursement form (provided by the Faculty Research Office) along with your receipts.

Gender and Sexuality

There will be a meet and greet for HDRs and supervisors researching in the Gender and Sexuality.  Registration for this Saturday lunchtime session is required

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