Your health and safety while on placements

The following aspects of health, safety and wellbeing are a reminder of what you should expect during your placement.

Know your Placement Supervisor
You should know who your supervisor is during your time at the placement organisation. Your supervisor will be able to provide you with guidance about what your role is, and what duties you are expected to carry out. They should also be available for you to talk to if you are unsure about any aspects of your placement.

Receive an Induction
You should be given an induction to the placement organisation during your first day. It needs to outline the workplace, the people and where you will be located. An induction must also cover general safety aspects like emergency procedures, evacuations and first aid arrangements.

Identification of Hazards
If there are any hazards that you could potentially encounter during your placement, they should be made clear to you along with any extra training and protective equipment or clothing you are required to wear. Hazards might be in the form of materials (e.g. chemicals), equipment, activities, or the locations you are required to work with them.

Travel Safety
It is an inherent risk of practical placements that students will have to travel to and from a venue. You may even have to travel long distances to attended regional placements or fly to interstate or International placements. It is important in these instances that you as a student, are informed and provided with options to minimise your risks as far as is reasonably practicable.

THINGS TO CONSIDER

  • Allowing a reasonable time frame for traveling between appointments.
  • Ensuring colleagues and placement supervisors do not expect you to take calls while you are traveling.
  • Understanding that if you feel unfit to drive or ride you do not have to.
  • Seeking overnight accommodation if you are required to travel a long distance home after a long day.
  • Ensuring long distance travel or late work requirements are not followed by early commitments the following day.
  • Seek alternative transport, such as a taxi, when appropriate.
  • Try to use public transport whenever practical. The Deakin Bus Services are a free, convenient and sustainable mode of transport for Deakin staff and students, servicing the Geelong campuses.

* Refer to Deakin's Safe Travel Policy

DRIVER FATIGUE

Warning signs:

  • Feeling tired or sleepy.
  • Lane drifting.
  • Variations in speed.
  • Delayed reactions.
  • Reduced concentration.
  • Constant yawning.
  • Drifting into micro sleeps.
  • Nodding head, lapses in concentration.
  • Heavy or sore eyes, blurred vision.
  • Sweaty hands, impatience.
  • Reduced steering control, the vehicle wanders.
  • No recollection of the last few kilometers travelled.

Managing Driver Fatigue:

  • Better understand the signs of fatigue.
  • Ensure you have sufficient sleep before driving.
  • Don’t feel compelled to drive when you are feeling tired.
  • Drink plenty of water and avoid alcohol consumption prior to driving.
  • Take rest breaks with exercise after every two hours of driving.
  • Share the driving, where possible.
  • Stop and have a powernap if you feel drowsy.

What to do if there is an accident or incident
You should be clear about the emergency response procedures, but you will also need to report any incidents (no matter how minor) to the Placement Supervisor and the Health WIL team.

Your Safety & Security
Any threats or incidents that affect your wellbeing in relation to bullying, discrimination, sexual harassment and sexual assault are considered serious and will be managed in accordance with University policy. Contact the Health WIL team as soon as possible if you have any concerns.

Feeling overwhelmed?
If you are feeling overwhelmed you should speak with someone - it could be your Placement Supervisor, your Unit Chair, the WIL team or Deakin's free student counselling service.

Remember that while you are on your placement you are representing Deakin University and are required to:

  • Conduct yourself professionally in accordance with placement requirements of the University and the host organisation
  • Complete all training requirements (including safety training) required by the host organisation
  • Comply with relevant policies and procedures of the University, including the Student Code of Conduct, and external regulatory requirements (including standards of conduct and visa requirements)
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