Alfred Deakin Research Institute

Past Events

ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Ukraine and Russia: Entangled Histories and Contemporary Tensions
12 August 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Filip Slaveski presented.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI Thinker in Residence Workshop: Professor Lynn Meskell, Stanford University
15 August 2014

You are invited to a special workshop with Professor Lynn Meskell to discuss her work. Professor Meskell is currently in residence as ADRI’s Thinker in Residence and is living for a little while with her colleagues in cultural heritage. Her work concerns the politics and ethics of heritage today. As a committed believer in cosmopolitanism as an ethical stance that should guide scholarly and professional
endeavours in the heritage field, Professor Meskell's work critiques the ways in which the fields of archaeology and anthropology continue to resist engagement and recognition of the political implications of work they undertake in the field. She has worked as an archaeologist in Egypt, South Africa and Turkey. While maintaining her archaeological research, Profesor Meskell is also undertaking a large study of the World Heritage system with a particular interest in the implications of the increasing politicization of the World Heritage Committee on the local communities who live around World Heritage sites.

Professor Meskell’s work is made possible by a fascinating cross-over which blends her archaeological approach with ethnography and which is informed by cultural theory. So, if you want to know how to immerse yourself in ethnographic work, how to study the politics of cultural institutions, how to manage the politics of fieldwork and how to think about all this in relation to today’s increasingly globalized interconnected world, come and participate in our conversation with her. We will travel the world, discuss cosmopolitanism as both an idea and a practice, and think about the value of ethnographic approaches to studying practitioners at work.


HDR Workshop: Writing to be Read
5th August

This programme, comprising of 2 workshops a month apart, is aimed at those who are thinking about improving their writing and communicating their research to a broader audience. In the first instance, the programme is open to all currently-enrolled higher degree by research students in the Faculty of Arts and Education.

The workshop features:

  • Dennis Glover, columnist, speechwriter
  • Jennifer Kloester, biographer, novelist
  • John Watson, The Conversation

Part I: Producing a Readable Thesis/Book with Dr. John Hirst
5 August, Melbourne

How can PhD students write academically rigorous theses which captivate broad audiences beyond the assessors who are paid to read them? How can students turn good theses into successful books?  John Hirst, one of Australia's most eminent historians who has published some 15 books, will answer these questions in this interactive workshop. Students should bring an appetite to practice the art of writing or, as will often be the case, re-writing.

5th August
2-4pm
Melbourne City Campus
Level 3
550 Bourke Street
Conference Room

For further information, email: jo.collins@deakin.edu.au



ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars
: Liminal States: (Post)colonialism and the Politics of Asylum in Australia's Regional Resettlement Arrangement
29 July 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Victoria Stead presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: States of Conservation: Protection, Politics and Pacting within UNESCO's World Heritage Committee
30th July 2014

Presenter: Prof. Lynn Meskell, Stanford University, USA and Thinker-in-Residence, Deakin University

Abstract:
The title, States of Conservation, deliberately references the two 'states' that today occupy critical yet oppositional nodes within UNESCO's 1972 Convention and its conservation agenda. It recalls the State of Conservation reports commissioned by the World Heritage Center in conjunction with its Advisory Bodies that relay the condition of World Heritage properties to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee. But more critically, 'states' here also refers to the most powerful, emergent players in World Heritage site inscription and protection processes — the States Parties or member states of the 1972 Convention. In this talk I contend that as the rush for World Heritage inscription increases and economic and geo-political pacting between nations intensifies, the resources, concerns and commitments for conservation of sites already inscribed dramatically declines. I trace the national economic interests, international political pacting, and voting blocs through which particular countries increasingly set the World Heritage agenda and recast UNESCO as an agency for global branding rather than global conservation.

Biography:
Lynn Meskell is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Archaeology Center at Stanford University. She received her BA (Hons) First Class and the University Medal from the University of Sydney in 1994. For her Phd in Archaeology (1994-1997), she was awarded the Kings College scholarship from Cambridge University. She held the Salvesen Junior Research Fellowship at New College, Oxford University (1997-1999) before accepting a position at Columbia University in New York City where she became Professor in 2005. From that time onwards she has been Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and Honorary Professor at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. In 1999 she founded the Journal of Social Archaeology, for which she serves as Editor. She has been awarded grants and fellowships including those from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Australian Research Council, the American Academy in Rome, the School of American Research and Deakin University. Some of her recent books and edited collections include Embedding Ethics (2005, Berg) and Cosmopolitan Archaeologies (2009, Duke UP) and The Nature of Culture: The New South Africa (2012, Blackwells). Her new research focuses on the role of UNESCO in terms of heritage rights, sovereignty and international politics.

5:30pm
Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Meeting Room 3

Contact Yamini Narayanan at y.narayanan@deakin.edu.au


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Development, Heritage, Environment, and Contemporary Histories in the Owen Stanleys: The Kokoda WWII Oral History Project
15 July 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Born and raised in PNG, Dr Jonathan Ritchie presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Conference: 19th George Rudé Seminar in French History and Civilisation
10-12 July 2014

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute and The Faculty of Arts and Education of Deakin University were honoured to be hosts for the 19th George Rudé Seminar in French History and Civilisation, which was held at the Geelong Waterfront Campus between 10 and 12 July 2014.

Established in 1978 to honour George Rudé's contributions to the study of French history in Australasia, the George Rudé Seminar is a biennial conference that brings together specialists in French history and cultural from Australia, New Zealand and around the world.

Since 2005, a peer-reviewed selection of papers for each seminar has been published on-line through H-France.

The 2014 Seminar was organised with the collaboration of three Melbourne universities: the University of Melbourne, Monash University, and Latrobe University. We are pleased to welcome Pamela Pilbeam, Jean-Yves Mollier, John Merriman, Philippe Minard, Timothy Tackett, Marissa Linton, and Simon Kitson.

The Seminar was followed by a special one-day public seminar commemorating the centenary of the start of the First World War. This seminar, 'France 1914', will be held in the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, on 15 July 2014.

Alfred Deakin Research Institute
Waterfront Campus
Geelong, VIC
Australia

For more information, please visit the conference website.


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Children of the Revolution: Indonesia's Early Colombo Plan Scholars and their Journey to Australia
1 July 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Indonesia specialist, Dr Jemma Purdey, presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: Towards a pedagogy of feeling - Understanding how museums create a space for cross-cultural encounters
25th June 2014

Presenter: Prof. Andrea Witcomb, Deakin University

Abstract:

In this paper I engaged with two developments - a growing understanding that citizenship involves political activity on the part of citizens in the public sphere and that affective relationships are an important aspect of this activity - to engage with the increasing use of affective interpretation strategies within exhibitions. I argued that the use of these strategies can be understood as the beginning of a new moment in museological practice that is concerned not so much with finding ways to become more pluralistic in who is represented within museums but in building opportunities for cross-cultural encounters in ways that question established relationships between self and other. I call this new moment a 'pedagogy of feeling', marking it as distinctive from both a 'pedagogy of walking' (Bennett 1995), a term used by Tony Bennett to encapsulate the specific exhibition strategies that supported evolutionary narratives, and a 'pedagogy of listening' which I suggest marks the moment in which exhibition practices were concerned with finding ways to increase the number of voices found in museum exhibitions as part of a civic program to encourage greater degrees of tolerance. Central to a 'pedagogy of feeling' is, I argue, the idea of a 'terrible gift (Simon 2006) which is enacted through an exhibition syntax that uses a wide variety of affective or sensorial interpretation strategies.

Biography:

Andrea Witcomb is Professor of Cultural Heritage and Director of the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific and Deputy Director of the Alfred Deakin Research Institute at Deakin University, in Melbourne, Australia. She has a long standing research interest in relations between museums and communities and in the use of immersive interpretation strategies, interests that first came to light in her book ReImagining the Museum: Beyond the Mausoleum (Routledge 2003). In her recent work she has combined these interests to focus more closely on the ways in which museums and heritage sites stage cross-cultural encounters. Recent publications deal with the affective power of objects and places and the use of affective forms of interpretation in exhibitions and heritage sites. She is currently leading two projects funded by the Australian Research Council - one on Australia's collecting sector and its engagement with cultural diversity and changing understandings of citizenship, the other on Australia's extra-territorial war heritage where she is focusing on the impact of cross-cultural collective memories for how these sites are managed and interpreted.

5:30pm
Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Meeting Room 3

DINNER: The seminar was followed by dinner at Bar Humbug.


ADRI Public Seminars: Camp Followers and the Minimum Wage
20 June 2014

The ADRI Seminars are a lunchtime series open to the public, where ourresearchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic. Deakin University's Melbourne City Campus, with its lush and stylish setting, offers a calming respite from the hustle and bustle of Melbourne's CBD.

There probably isn't a more enjoyable way to spend your lunch-break!

Presented by Professor Chris Doucouliagos.

1pm-2:30pm
Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3
550 Bourke Street

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Inequality, Human Capital and Economic Development
17 June 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Dr Md Rabiul Islam, presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Contemporary History Seminar: Rewriting the History of the World Game in Australia
2 June 2014

Dr Roy Hay

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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Book Launch: A History of Football in Australia: A game of two halves
2nd June 2014

by Roy Hay (ADRI Honorary Fellow) & Bill Murray

Since the creation of the A-League in 2005, success in the World Cup in Germany in 2006 and Australia's entry into the Asian Confederation, football in Australia has grown enormously in popularity and participation. A History of Football in Australia: A Game of Two Halves details many of the thousands of Australians who have played, supported and followed football, over a history that exceeds 150 years. It is a rich history that has its roots in immigration and a rapidly evolving national identity.

Fully illustrated with over 400 images, this comprehensive book tells the story of the game in a lively and provocative account. It covers the development of the clubs, the battle to compete in the World Cup, the foundation and growth of the A-league and the various ups and downs along the way. It is the story of a code that is growing in stature for Australians.


2pm to 4pm
The Atrium
Sally Walker Building
Deakin University Waterfront Campus

For further info:

jo.collins@deakin.edu.au / 5227 1464


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Health Service Utilisation Among Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Groups in Australia: Findings from HILDA
3 June 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Leading demographer and social epidemiologist, Associate Professor Santosh Jatrana presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: Childhood, Commemoration and Cultural Heritage
28 May 2014

Presenter:

Prof. Kate Darian-Smith, University of Melbourne

Kate Darian-Smith is Professor of Australian Studies and History, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, and Professor of Cultural Studies, Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning. She has published widely on many aspects of Australian history, including on memory studies and the histories of childhood and children's play, and is co-editor (with Carla Pascoe) of Children, Childhood and Cultural Heritage (Routledge, 2013).

Abstract:

This paper examined how the histories and cultural heritage of children in Australia have been publicly commemorated, and how this has altered over time. Examples range from the memorialization of the lives and deaths of white children in the colonial period to the politicized and contested public commemorations of Indigenous children removed from their families, and the recent memorials and exhibitions acknowledging children who were institutionalized or sent to Australia as child migrants. Issues raised through these case studies include the concepts of children's rights, Indigenous rights and human rights more generally - and the connections between human rights discourse, cultural heritage and the past.

5:30pm
Deakin City Campus
Meeting Room 3
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Comfortable Modernities: Between Cool Histories and Hot Development
20 May 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Professor Tim Winter, Research Chair of Cultural Heritage presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Public Lecture and Roundtable: The 10,000-Mile-Long Mirror
5 May 2014

Dr Richard Rabinowitz, President of American History Worskshop

Richard Rabinowitz is one of the leading public historians in the United States, with over 45 years of experience in creating new museums and exhibitions on every aspect of American history and culture.
As founder and president since 1980 of American History Workshop, Dr. Rabinowitz has led the creative work of scholars, curators, educators, artists, architects, designers, and institutional planners in fashioning over 500 successful and innovative history programs at sites like the New-York Historical Society, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York; the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute; the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati; and state heritage parks and local and regional historical societies in 33 states and the District of Columbia.

At this public lecture, Dr Richard Rabinowitz, President of American History Worskshop, reflected on the experience of exploring Australia’s museum culture, a process he has found most useful in making him aware of the distinctiveness of his own approach and that of his compatriots in the US. He ruminated on the differences between American and Australian museum cultures, focusing in particular on differences in national attitudes and practices in public history, pedagogy, institutional politics and financing. Key themes he addressed included:

WHAT, PRECISELY, IS THE SUBJECT OF HISTORY? - realizing the power of museums to engage visitors as kinesthetic (embodied) and socially enmeshed learners

EXPERIENCE VS. INFORMATION - themes vs. stories; showing off what WE know

IS THERE AN AUSTRALIAN CUISINE? - the radical disengagement in the US from national narratives, and the contrast with Australia

THE REAL STUFF [collection objects, sites] AND THE “OTHER” STUFF - the interpretive toolbox as an equal focal-point of visitor attentiveness

5:30pm to 7.30pm
Deakin University Melbourne City Centre
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne

More info: Professor Andrea Witcomb: andrea.witcomb@deakin.edu.au


Launch: ADRI-Sustineo Pacific Index
6 May 2014

The Pacific Index is the result of research collaboration between sustainability Sustineo and the Alfred Deakin Research Institute (ADRI), headed by:

Professor Mark McGillivray (Chief Investigator and leader for the International Development research group, ADRI)
and Andrew Rowe (Managing Director, Sustineo).

The 3-year project was partly funded by an ARC Linkage grant and the results were presented at the official launch in Canberra on Tuesday 6 May.

The Pacific Index (PI) is a multidimensional index that ranks the relative contribution of 22 donor countries assistance to Pacific countries. It ranks the donor countries on the basis of seven drivers of development:

  • foreign aid
  • trade
  • migration investment
  • security
  • the creation and dissemination of new technologies
  • and environmental sustainability.

The official release of the 2014 Pacific Index was followed by a presentation of the research and an interpretation of the results by Professor Mark McGillivray, and a question and answer session.

8.30am-11am
Regatta Point
Commonwealth Park
Canberra

For further information please contact Ms Jo Collins: jo.collins@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars:‘Look, Listen and Feel’: Towards a Pedagogy of Feeling in Museums
6 May 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Professor Andrea Witcomb presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Contemporary History Seminar: German New Guinea: Conscription and the Press
28 April 2014

Presented by Daniel Perri

German New Guinea, 1916. It has been two years since the fall of the colony after the Australian invasion. In Australia the New Guinea campaign is still in many people's minds thanks to the power of the jingoistic press and pro-conscription politicians. The newspapers are distributing an ever increasing number of unsubstantiated reports warning the public of German plots to use New Guinea as a naval and army outpost to attack Australia in the ambition to find a new home for a 'great white nation'. Under the backdrop of the call to arms campaign and the first conscription plebiscite this paper will examine how newspapers and politicians spread propaganda regarding the Germans in the Pacific islands to achieve their objective of persuading more men to join the war and maintain enthusiasm for the war effort.

1-2pm.
Burwood N1.05
Waurn Ponds ic1.108
Waterfront AD5.202


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Savage Minds, Wild Butterflies
22 April 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Gillian Tan, Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow, and Prize-winning author, Dr Robert Kenny, presented this seminar.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Book Launch: 'Remembering the Cold War' and 'The Dresden Firebombing'
3 April 2014

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute was proud to present Remembering the Cold War by Professor David Lowe and Dr Tony Joel and The Dresden Firebombing by Dr Tony Joel.

Internationally recognized historian Professor Joan Beaumont launched both books on 3 April at 6pm at Readings, St Kilda.

Increasingly we are captured by the memories of the past. But how is the past used to shape national identity, current day international relations and political identity?

6pm - 8pm
Readings
112 Acland St, St Kilda, Tel: 9525 3852

RSVP by Monday 31 March to Ms Jo Collins at jo.collins@deakin.edu.au or Tel: 03 5227 1464


Alfred Deakin Research Institute's 5th Anniversary Celebration
4 April 2014

An afternoon tea to celebrate the Alfred Deakin Research Institute's 5th anniversary!

At the event we articulated our future direction and celebrating our achievements to date. In doing so, we will launched the ADRI-Sustineo Pacific Index. This is a major initiative of ADRI's International Development Research Group. The index, the first of its kind for the Pacific, will provide a critical tool to assess rich country support for development in the region.

With a view to the future, we also launched our 2014-2017 Strategic Research Plan. The plan will help strengthen ADRI's profile as a leading humanities and social sciences research institute committed to pursuing research that makes a difference to Australia and the world.

ADRI's success is dependent on the support of the Deakin community. Over the past five years, we have enjoyed a close relationship with many areas of the University and know this will continue as ADRI moves forward.

2pm-4pm
The Atrium (enter via Western Beach Road).
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong

RSVP by 31st March to Jo Collins: jo.collins@deakin.edu.au


Contemporary History Seminar: Iron Ore and Australia's Relations with Asia, 1960-1976
7 April 2014

Presenter:

Dr David Lee, Director, Historical Publications and Research Unit, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Abstract:

In 1938 the Lyons Government imposed an embargo on the export of Australian iron ore. The motivation was strategic-to forestall Japanese interest in the development of known deposits of iron ore at Yampi Sound in north-west Western Australia. A contemporaneous geological assessment of Australia's iron ore resources concluded that they were so scarce that they needed to be conserved for the local Australian steel industry. The strategic motivation for the embargo disappeared in 1945 but the embargo endured for a further fifteen years. Finally, in 1960, pressure on the Australian balance of payments prompted the Menzies Government to relax the iron ore embargo to encourage exploration that might improve Australia's overseas income. The relaxation yielded stupendous results: the discovery of immense reserves and the establishment within fifteen years of an iron ore export industry in Western Australia's remote Pilbara which by 1976 had become the major supplier of the Japanese steel industry. This paper will examine the emergence of the new iron ore industry in Western Australia in the context of Australia's relationship with Japan.

1-2pm
Deakin Waurn Ponds Campus: ic1.108
Deakin Burwood Campus: N3.11
Deakin Waterfront Campus: ad5.004


Cultural Heritage Seminar: Reclamation: Making landscape in Pearl River Delta/reflections on the culture-nature binary
7 April 2014

Presenter:

Dr. Denis Bryne, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney

Denis Byrne joined the Institute in 2014 as a Senior Research Fellow specialising in heritage studies. He is an archaeologist whose work has been in Indigenous heritage conservation in Australia and in the cultural politics of heritage in Southeast Asia. His books Surface Collection (Rowman and Littlefield 2007) and Counterheritage (Routledge in press 2014) challenge Western-derived heritage practices in Asia and explore new approaches to the writing of archaeology and heritage. He is currently researching the transnational heritage of migration in the Australia-Asia sphere.

Abstract:

Since at least the Song Dynasty (960-1279) people in the Pearl River Delta have been 'reclaiming' the delta seascape to create new farmland. More recently reclamation in the Delta and up and down the China coast has been undertaken for port and airport construction, urban expansion, fish farm and theme park construction. The English term 'reclamation', implying a recovery of something already ours, is reflective of the modernity's vision of a subservient nature. But activity in the reclamation zone also speaks to the permeability of the land-sea border and the tension between human projects and natural processes, especially when we think of 21st century climate change and its promise of inundation. Reclamation seems like a good fact and metaphor for thinking about ICS's research theme 'Heritage and Environment' which, rather than just a combination of two research areas, is vitally interested in the culture-nature binary that haunts them and ways of transcending it.

The specific history of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta is entwined with the history of work-travel and immigration between there to California, Australia and other destinations and the transnational flow of environmental knowledge that accompanied it.

5:30pm
Deakin City Campus
Meeting Room 3
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne

The seminar will be followed by dinner around 7 p.m. at a nearby restaurant. Please RSVP for dinner booking

RSVP to Yamini Narayanan: y.narayanan@deakin.edu.au


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Wild Caterpillars, Savage Minds
8 April 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Gillian Tan, Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow, and Prize-winning author, Dr Robert Kenny, will be presenting.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.

ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Human Capital, Discrimination and the Gender Wage Gap in Bangladesh
25 March 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Salma Ahmed will be presenting.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Happiness, Income and Aspiration
11 March 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Professor Mark McGillivray presented.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Human capital, discrimination and the gender wage gap in Bangladesh
25 March 2014

The ADRI Seminars are a lunchtime series open to the public, where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic. Deakin University's Melbourne City Campus, with its lush and stylish setting, offers a calming respite from the hustle and bustle of Melbourne's CBD.

Dr Salma Ahmed, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in International Development, will be presenting.

There probably isn't a more enjoyable way to spend your lunch-break!

12-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Book Launch
19 February 2014

Dr Donna-Lee Frieze joined Pam Maclean in conversation about her new book:
Totally Unofficial: The Autobiography of Raphael Lemkin

Raphael Lemkin, a Polish Jew, altered international law and redefined the world's understanding of group rights. He invented the concept and word "genocide", propelled the idea into international legal status, and was twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.
He left behind a legacy of major contributions to international law, and an unpublished
autobiography.
Presented here for the first time is his own account of his life, from his boyhood in Poland to
his perilous escape from Nazi Europe, his arrival in the United States and his rise to influence
as an academic, thinker and revered lawyer of international criminal law.

Dr Donna-Lee Frieze taught a graduate unit on genocide at Deakin University, and is a 2013
- 2014 Prins Foundation Senior Scholar at the Center for Jewish History in New York City.
She has digitized Lemkin's entire autobiography, the original of which is held in the New York
Public Library.

Pam Maclean is an Honorary Fellow, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University.

7.30pm
Jewish Holocaust Centre
13 - 15 Selwyn Street, Elsternwick

Enquiries: 9528 1985 or admin@jhc.org.au


ADRI Lunchtime Seminar Series
4 January 2014

The ADRI Seminars are a lunchtime series open to the public, where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic. Deakin University's Melbourne City Campus, with its lush and stylish setting, offers a calming respite from the hustle and bustle of Melbourne's CBD.

There probably isn't a more enjoyable way to spend your lunch-break! Snacks provided.

1-2:30pm
Deakin University Melbourne City Campus
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Workshop: Multiple ontologies/ontological relativity workshop
17-18 December 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute's Sustainable Communities and Regions Cluster proudly presented this interdisciplinary workshop.

The notion that ontology, as a system of what there is in the world, could be multiple, or relative to another, stands in contrast to notions of singularity and absoluteness. At this level of formulation, multiplicity, or relativity, is defined in opposition to a unitary, and unifying, system, yet we can surmise nothing further about the implications of the multiple, or even what it means. This workshop is dedicated to the precise ways in which there could be, or are, multiple interpretations of multiple ontologies, leading to various meanings and applications. By encouraging constructive cross-disciplinary exchange, particularly in the disciplines of Anthropology, Literary Studies and Philosophy, the workshop aims to arrive at both a clearer articulation of multiplicity/relativity and a corollary clarification of difference, with implications for ethics and responsibility.

Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3
550 Bourke Street

REGISTRATIONS ARE NOW CLOSED.

For more information, please contact: Dr. Gillian G. Tan, gillian.tan@deakin.edu.au.


Seminar: Approaching cultural landscapes in post-settler New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the United States of America
9 December 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute and Parks Victoria held the final Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific (CHCAP) seminar for 2013 on Monday 9th December. We were delighted that Paulette Wallace (Deakin University) was our presenter.

The idea of cultural landscapes for heritage management has gained profile in recent times as a useful idea for moving away from restricting considerations of heritage as 'dots on maps', as a means of breaking through nature/culture dichotomies, and as a concept with the breadth to support indigenous heritage. Yet there is still a level of confusion surrounding cultural landscapes in relation to how this idea is applied in practice. How do you apply cultural landscapes for heritage management, and what is a cultural landscape approach? To explore these questions, this seminar will chart the genesis of Paulette's PhD research from an island in Wellington, New Zealand, to its examination of cultural landscapes for heritage management, to Paulette's search for answers in Australia, Canada and the United States, her return to New Zealand, and her recommendations for a cultural landscape approach for future heritage management in New Zealand's protected areas.

Paulette Wallace is a PhD Candidate at Deakin University. Prior to her move to Melbourne in March 2011, Paulette worked for the New Zealand Department of Conservation, maintaining and promoting historic places in and around Wellington city. Paulette is a former student of Museum and Heritage Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, where her initial interest in a career working in museums, was soon overshadowed by her interest in the management of heritage outside of the museum, and in areas recognised for both their indigenous and non-indigenous heritage values.

5:30pm for 6:30pm start
Deakin University Melbourne City Centre, Level 3, 550 Bourke Street.

THE EVENT WAS BOOKED OUT.

For further information contact Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Wicked Problems
15 November 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Brian Coffey, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

2:30-3:30pm
Deakin University Melbourne City Campus
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar
12 November 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Perri Campbell, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

12:30-1:30pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar:
6 November 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Grazyna Zajdow, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

12:30-1:30pm
Deakin University Burwood Campus

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Muse/Museal: The Lost Workshop and The Artificial Flower - a collection of writings and an exhibition
31 October 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the final Deakin Cultural Heritage seminar for 2013, delivered by Elizabeth Anya-Petrivna (RMIT/National Trust of Australia (Victoria)).

Outline of The Lost Workshop project:

The Lost Workshop is a contrivance - emerging out of the fragmented and meagre traces found in the historic record about artificial flower making. No substantial archival material exists detailing the work of Melbourne artificial florists, yet they thrived here. Despite these voids this project reveals the workings of a nineteenth century flower making studio as a place that can be 'imagined' both as a written and exhibited project. Can The Lost Workshop be found through instructions manuals or fit for purpose tools; perhaps in template illustrations or first person chronicles? Can it be evidenced in photographs and shop labels; maybe newspaper reports such as lost and found notices or classified advertisements?

The writing project attempts to find the flower makers of nineteenth century Melbourne by using the material objects at hand, many of which are found in museums, collections, archives and libraries. The workshops materialise as bijoux spaces, often in arcades trading alongside shops selling harmoniums, Turkish baths, theatres and other entertainments. The narrative follows the careers of five makers - each using different materials, methods, and scales of enterprise.

The exhibition in particular, will attempt to 'revitalise' a collection of flower making tools. These objects retain a practical memory of usage but the knowledge associated with them is missing or compromised. Inert, they are objects cut loose from the gestures and forms they were made for. But is this stasis an illusion? The exhibition looks back at these workplaces and the things that were made as 'vibrant'. The tools and workshop are reanimated in the context of an imagined place, where speculations can be dreamed, asking the audience to imagine working in The Lost Workshop. This is a place in which no one has worked recently and if anyone happens to visit - by using the artificial flower in their design practice - they only use a few tools and some materials from many; they take some knowledge from much. We try to imagine what this place looked like before it was lost; what does it still contain and what can happen here?

This project looks at the agency of objects in curation - their affect on the curator and the transmission of this 'affect' to the audience. Taking Jane Bennett's understanding of Object Oriented Ontology and her text 'Vibrant Matter' this study attempts to look at 'thingness' in both historic writing and exhibition - asking are historic objects ever passive and invert, especially when on exhibition, and if active how do we get the audience to notice their vitality?

Elizabeth Anya-Petrivna is a curator in the Cultural Collections Team of the National Trust of Australia (Victoria), whose responsibilities include the Trust's outstanding costume collection. Elizabeth has curated a suite of exhibitions at Como House on mid-twentieth century Melbourne fashion and design. This trilogy of shows followed the process of fashion making from the workroom - to the salon - to the magazine. She is currently completing her PhD at RMIT University entitled 'The Lost Workshop', a project based exploration of the artisanal production of artificial flowers in the nineteenth century.

5:15pm for 5;30pm start
Royal Historical Society of Victoria
239 A'Beckett Street, Melbourne (entry via William Street).

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: An Ecology of Religion
29 October 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Gillian Tan, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

12:30-1:30pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Higher Degree Research Information Session: 'What's It All About Alfie?' Having a stellar start to a research career
24 October 2013

Melbourne Burwood Campus hosted an Information Session for HDR students. It provided an opportunity for staff to hear from some of the Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellows and gain insight into their research projects and career development.

There were 2 keynote speakers: Professor Jane den Hollander, our Vice Chancellor and Professor Fethi Mansouri, Director, Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation.

A researcher herself, the VC's visit offered a rare chance to learn about the University's future directions and ambitions in relation to its research.

Later in the afternoon Professor Mansouri spoke about how to grow a research career as an ECR.

Researchers and academics from all disciplines attended. The presentations were of particular interest to early career researchers. Following the formal presentations there was lunch and time for networking.

9:00am - 2:00pm
Lecture Theatre 2
I2.05, Deakin University's Melbourne Burwood Campus

Please contact Liesl Freeman for more information.


Seminar: Remaking Asylum in Post-War France - Refugees, Repatriation and the Return to Normalcy
15 October 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Greg Burgess, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

12:30-1:30pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
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For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Students' Journey Towards Developing (some) Professional Practices
9 October 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Kieran Lim, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

Abstract: 

Government policy, and universities themselves, now require graduates to have a set of generic or employability skills. At Deakin, the Graduate Learning Outcomes include (inter alia), communication, digital literacy and (global) citizenship. This Brown Bag Seminar will discuss some studies on students' attitudes towards professional communication practices, OH&S and some ethical issues, as well as self-assessment of their ability to use digital technology. It is argued that different professional and social cultures have different expectations, and these influence students' attitudes and abilities. As more students choose to study combined degrees, or take elective units outside their home disciplines, the clash of cultures hinders learning.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Deakin Policy Forum: Coal Seam and Shale Gas: The Implications of Gas Developments in Australia, US and Globally
8 October 2013

This Deakin Policy Forum raised key questions regarding the revolution in energy markets globally, associated with newly commercial technology in the coal seam gas and shale gas sectors of the energy market. There has been debate in the US about the extent or longevity of the boom in unconventional hydrocarbon production from shales, and in Australia about massive LNG exports using coal seam gas. Domestic gas market impacts and impacts on ground water and other industries have also been controversial.

New research suggests the boom is real, substantial and highly beneficial across the community if well managed. Australia has substantial potential to produce its own shale gas, as well as CSG, and those resources are likely to help maintain Australia's position as a major LNG exporter, and relatively low-priced region for natural gas, for many decades to come.

Speaker Information
- Professor Peter Hartley, BHP Billiton Professor, University of Western Australia and Rice University, Houston
- Dr Peter Stone, Deputy Director, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, CSIRO
- Mr David Byers, CEO, Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association (APPEA)
- Associate Professor Samantha Hepburn, Faculty of Business and Law, Deakin Universty

The policy forum was chaired by Professor Michael Porter, Research Professor of Public Policy, Alfred Deakin Research Institute


Public Lecture: The United Nations and the Origins of the Genocide Convention 1946 to 1948
23 September 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute held a public lecture by Professor Jost Dülffer, from the Historisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, in Germany.

Monday 23 September, 2013
5.00pm for 5.30pm lecture, concludes at 6.30pm
Deakin University Melbourne City Centre
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street, Melbourne

The origins of the Genocide Convention are mostly very much personalized, stressing the impact of individuals such as Raphael Lemkin and others. Whatever personal influences meant in this case, they were embedded in an international setting of the Post-War era.

This contribution argues that the interests of the great powers, the permanent members of the UN Security Council were important and played a major role in the negotiations which dragged on for a long time. Thus, it was not by chance that the UN Human Rights Convention was negotiated and passed
separately, but almost in a direct parallel: The Genocide Declaration dated from 9 December 1948 (Resolution 260), while the Human Rights Declaration was passed by the General Assembly on 10 December 1948.

This gives a hint as to the importance attached to the two Declarations in international politics at this time. This also points to the minor importance which the Genocide Declaration developed in the next years to come.


Conference: Preaching Australia: Religion, Public Conversation and the Sermon
19-20 September 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute co-sponsored this conference with St Mark's National Theological Centre, at Charles Sturt University, in Canberra.

Two very senior historians of Australia - Alan Atkinson (UNE/USyd) and Hilary Carey (Uni of Newcastle) were the plenary speakers.

Visit their website.

For further information, please contact Joanna Cruickshank at: joanna.cruickshank@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Trajectories in Health Behaviour of Immigrants in Australia: A Longitudinal Study
17 September 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by PhD candidate, Mr Suresh Joshi, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Language as a Social Determinant of Health
11 September 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Associate Professor Ismet Fanany and Dr Rebecca Fanany, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Rethinking The Museum Experience
2 September 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute and the Immigration Museum Victoria hosted a lunchtime seminar, featuring Philipp Schorch (Alfred Deakin Research Institute ) and Andrea Witcomb (Deputy Director, Alfred Deakin Research Institute) and LauraJane Smith (ANU).

Although it is widely acknowledged that museums produce experiences, the nature of these experiences has proven to be difficult to formulate and substantiate. In this seminar, three museum scholars attempt to rethink the museum experience through research conducted at the Immigration Museum. The insights emerging from these research projects will be of interest to museum scholars, students and professionals, particularly those working in the areas of visitor research, concept development, exhibition design, interpretation and education.

Please RSVP to IMRSVP@museum.vic.gov.au


Seminar: Travel, Museums, Meaning
29 August 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Instute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the sixth of Deakin's Cultural Heritage seminars for 2013, delivered by Phillip Schorch (Deakin University).

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Book Launch: Gardens of Fire: An investigative memoir by Dr Robert Kenny
27 August 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute launched ADRI Visiting Fellow, Dr Robert Kenny's latest book: Gardens of Fire: An investigative memoir.

The Black Saturday bushfires of 7 February 2009 were the most catastrophic in Australia's history; one hundred and seventy three people lost their lives and over two thousand homes were destroyed.

In Redesdale, Robert Kenny was prepared with a sound fire plan, but the reality of the fire was more ferocious and more unpredictable than he could have imagined - by the end of the day, his house and the life contained within were gone.

Gardens of Fire extends his experience of watching his life go up in flames to an investigation of the idea that, as humans, we are children of fire.


Seminar: Spontaneity and Perfection: MacIntyre vs Logstrup
20 August 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, jointly with the Center for Citizenship and Globalisation, hosted a seminar by Dr Patrick Stokes, Deakin University, as part of the 2013 Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au


Policy Forum: Australia and Papua New Guinea
13th August 2013

The Federal Election had been called, but where is the policy debate?

Join us for a Policy Forum on Australia and Papua New Guinea, concerning the Regional Resettlement Agreement, otherwise known as 'The PNG Solution'. Featuring:

  • His Excellency Charles W. Leipani, Papua New Guinea's High Commissioner to Australia
  • Mr Rowan Callick, Asia-Pacific Editor for The Australian
  • Ms Jo Chandler, freelance journalist and Honorary Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Research Institute
  • Ms Stephanie Copus-Campbell, Executive Director, Harold Mitchell Foundation

Event flyer here

Download the program

Any further queries please email Ms Jo Collins
jo.collins@deakin.edu.au
or phone (03) 5227 1464


Seminar: Museums, Migration and Meanings
14th August 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Philipp Schorch, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Nietzsche on Truth in Politics
6 August 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, jointly with the Center for Citizenship and Globalisation, hosted a seminar by Professor Rosalyn Diprose, University of New South Wales, as part of the 2013 Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Narrowing the Development Gap in ASEAN
6 August 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Mark McGillivray as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Understanding and Responding to the Migration of Health Professionals from India
23 July 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Associate Professor Santosh Jatrana, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Robots and Respect: The Case For and Against Lethal Autonomous Robots
23 July 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, jointly with the Center for Citizenship and Globalisation, hosted a seminar by Dr Rob Sparrow, Monash University, as part of the 2013 Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Museums and Social Inclusion
25 July 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Instute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the fifth of Deakin's Cultural Heritage seminars for 2013, delivered by Annette Tapp.

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Remembering the Cold War
12 July 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by our Director, Professor David Lowe, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: At the Periphery of Recognition: Childhood and Social Exclusion
16 July 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, jointly with the Center for Citizenship and Globalisation, hosted a seminar by Dr Joanne Faulkner, University of New South Wales, as part of the 2013 Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Colonial laws in contemporary PNG
25 June 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Andrew Barnao, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Commemorating Catastrophe: Victoria's Black Saturday Bushfires 2009
20 June 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Instute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the fourth of Deakin's Cultural Heritage seminars for 2013, delivered by Professor William Logan (Deakin University).

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: The impact of international engagement 1990-2010 on the political transition in Burma/Myanmar
5 June 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Anthony Ware, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: What does "LGBT Rights are Human Rights" Mean in Practice? Evidence from Kyrgyzstan
31 May 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Cai Wilkinson, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Jinhin Mongol/Real Mongolian: The Museums of Mongolia in the post socialist period
30 May 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Instute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the third of Deakin's Cultural Heritage seminars for 2013, delivered by Sally Watterson (University of Sydney).

Since its transition to democracy in 1999, Mongolia has undergone rapid change. Local and International scholarship has accelerated in the past two decades. A substantial amount has been written about an emerging new national identity and its linkage to historical precedents. Though museums are key purveyors of historical narratives, scholarship about Mongolia¹s museums has been minimal by comparison to other areas.

This research explores the ways in which key Mongolian museums have responded to changes under democracy. Further, it seeks to explore the extent to which museums responses reflect wider issues popular in Mongolian society. Using a group of case studies it will be demonstrated that a rich museum culture historically exists in Mongolia. However, museums were marginalized during the economic and political upheaval and each has thus needed to operate opportunistically rather than strategically. This lack of security has led museums at times to emphasize popular historical issues, rather than lead in scholarly revision of history.

Sally Watterson has 15 years experience working both locally and internationally in various roles in museums, historic houses and national parks. Her interests are management, curatorial and interpretation.

Sally holds a Graduate Diploma (Heritage Studies) University of New England and Bachelor of Arts (Art History) from the University of Sydney. She is currently consulting on a number of heritage projects in NSW and lecturing in Museum Studies at the University of Sydney.

Sally worked at the National Museum of Mongolia in a capacity building role from 2001 - 2003, and has continued to have a keen interest in the development of Museums in Mongolia. Sally is currently in the latter stages of candidature (Doctor of Philosophy) at Deakin University and her work explores impacts of the post socialist period on Mongolian Museums.

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Gender and Class in PNG: The Story of Stella
14 May 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Ceridwen Spark, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Vulnerability and Resilience to Economic Shocks in Melanesia
30 April 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Simon Feeny, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: The Joint Historical Archaeological Survey of the Anzac area, Gallipoli
23 April 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Instute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the second of Deakin's Cultural Heritage seminars for 2013, delivered by Cliff Ogleby (University of Melbourne).

This presentation will give an overview and preliminary results from the three government historical archaeological survey being undertaken on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. There have been three seasons of work to date, involving people from the University of Melbourne, The Australian Government, the New Zealand Government, the Turkish Government and the 18th March University in Canakkale.

The expedition combines extensive ground investigation looking for the remains of trenches and tunnels, the collection and conservation of artefacts, and mapping the results in a Geographic Information System. The 2012 season also employed ground penetrating radar (GPR) to detect trench remains under the main monuments at Lone Pine and the surrounds, The Nek and the car park at the 57th Battalion memorial.

Cliff is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Infrastructure Engineering at the University of Melbourne. He has over 30 years experience in the recording and documentation of cultural monuments, ranging from archaeological sites to rock paintings to buildings and structures. He is a foundation member of Australia ICOMOS, and has served on the ICOMOS ISC CIPA Heritage Documentation executive including 3 years as President. Cliff applies modern measurement and mapping technologies including photogrammetry, GIS, GPS, 3d laser scanning and field survey in archaeology and heritage documentation. He is also a member of the JHAS Gallipoli team

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: A Tale of Two Cities - Drought and Desalination in Perth and Melbourne
12 April 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Michael Porter and Sarah Hilborn, as part of the 2013 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Symposium: 'Leadership for the Next Generation: the third Alfred Deakin Research Institute symposium on Papua New Guinea
4-5 April 2013

The 2013 symposium focused on leadership as a challenge and as a way of understanding contemporary PNG.  With a new Government in PNG following the 2012 election, it is time to examine the issue that has dominated the nation's political discourse for so long.

Expressions of interest are now closed, but please visit the symposium website for further information, or contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: 'Sovereignty, translation and the integration of nature and culture in Asia-Pacific World Heritage'
21 March, 2013

The Alfred Deakin Research Instute and the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted the first of Deakin's Cultural Heritage seminars for 2013, delivered by Professor Ian Lilley (University of Queensland).

The World Heritage 'system' is having trouble accommodating Indigenous demands for recognition and involvement. The sticking points concern matters of sovereignty and translation. Sovereignty encompasses the perceived threat to the integrity of the nation-state from Indigenous claims on the one hand and what Indigenous people see as the affront to their autonomy represented by the universalizing processes of the World Heritage system on the other. Translation is central to this tension, because the parties involved seem largely unable to appreciate each other's presumptions and constraints. In terms of World Heritage policies, the problem has arisen largely because the we are not linking the priority '5 C's' together properly, especially when it comes to matching up 'communities' with 'communication'. This is probably most evident in the continuing separation of nature and culture in the World Heritage system, despite the fact that many of the communities we deal with have been communicating for some time that they don't approach their heritage this way. This seminar considers ways we all might do better in this connection, with a focus on our Asia-Pacific neighbourhood.

Ian Lilley is Professor in UQ's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit. He oversees ATSISU's research activities and the University's Indigenous postgraduate support program, and facilitates other research on Indigenous matters. He has undertaken archaeological and cultural heritage studies throughout mainland Australia as well as in Torres Strait, Papua New Guinea and various parts of the Pacific. He did his PhD fieldwork in PNG, investigating ancient indigenous trading systems. His current projects focus on World Heritage and Indigenous people, local capacity-building in cultural heritage management, globally and in the Asia-Pacific, and on developments in Pacific archaeology in New Caledonia, where he does field research with French colleagues. Ian is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities and the Society of Antiquaries of London as well as Secretary-General of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association and Convenor of the International Heritage Group NGO. He is a World Heritage Assessor for the UNESCO advisory body ICOMOS and Secretary-General of the ICOMOS International Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management. His other professional interests are archaeology and identity, archaeology's role in contemporary society and archaeological ethics.

See http://www.historyvictoria.org.au/about-us/our-headquarters

Please RSVP to Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Forum: 'The Economics of Health Prevention: Getting down to business'
14 March, 2013

With an Introduction from Professor Rob Carter, Head Deakin Health Economics and Director, this forum addressed the economics of health prevention from both a Government and Private Health perspective.

Dowload the program


Free Public Lecture: Chairman of Nobel Peace Prize-winning Panel, Dr R K Pachauri: 'The role of knowledge in promoting sustainable development and tackling climate change'
21 February 2013

Dr Rajendra K Pachauri

  • Chairperson of the Nobel Peace Prize (2007) winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
  • Director General, TERI - The Energy and Resources Institute (India)

It was Albert Einstein who said that problems cannot be solved at the level of awareness that created them. We now know that several human activities have in the past led to impacts such as the loss of biodiversity, pollution of our river systems and the air we breathe as well as an increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, leading to climate change. Fortunately, scientific knowledge and technological possibilities now make it possible for us to deal with some of these problems effectively, in a manner that could lead human society to a sustainable pattern of development. Institutions of higher learning have a special responsibility in developing and disseminating some of the solutions that we need. The presentation would essentially look at the issue of sustainable development and the challenge of climate change that new knowledge and its applications can deal with effectively within a reasonable window of time.

For further information, please contact adri-events@deakin.edu.au


Conference: 'Deleuze, Pragmatism and Post-Kantian Thought'
17-18 December 2012

The Deleuze, Pragmatism and Post-Kantian Thought Conference will be a point of convergence for a number of philosophical demands and developments. Firstly, there is at present a real need for some sustained work on the relationship between Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy and the tradition of American Pragmatism. There is a surprising lack of work on this topic, despite the fact that Deleuze refers to Pragmatism and cites the work of William James and Charles Sanders Peirce in a number of places. There is also a clear overlap between a number of Deleuzian and Pragmatist themes, including pluralism, constructivism, antirepresentationalism and opposition to the Cartesian conception of the subject. Secondly, there has been a growing interest in Deleuze’s relationship to the tradition of post-Kantian thought. Deleuze’s work on Kant and Nietzsche has received a substantial amount of attention, but a number of novel studies have also recently appeared on Deleuze’s reading of Maimon, and the complex and not merely hostile relationship that Deleuze has to Hegel. Finally, there has in recent years been a revival in American Pragmatist thought and the birth of what is now being called Neo-Pragmatism or the New Pragmatism. In the work of Rorty and Brandom in particular, this Neo-Pragmatism has taken on a specifically post-Kantian and Hegelian flavour, Hegel being understood by these thinkers to have developed an important, non-metaphysical and antirepresentationalist approach to the relationship between thought, the world and practical social activity. The conjunction of these demands and developments cry out for further exploration and present the conference’s participants with an opportunity to develop and extend new lines of philosophical inquiry.

Conference Schedule and Information


Workshop: Internet Freedom and the Law in Asia
10-11 December 2012

This workshop supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) / Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law, Munich / Faculty of Law,
Australian Catholic University / School of Law, and Alfred Deakin Research Institute.

The internet has been hailed as a formidable tool for the creative industries and the development of new business models. Opportunities created in this new environment are usually discussed without specific reference to cultural or regional peculiarities.

This workshop will take a different approach by focusing on the political economy of law in countries of the Asia-Pacific region in relation to the internet. It will focus on copyright, various cyber laws, competition law and other areas of law that have implications for the availability and distribution of content as well as for freedom of expression and privacy.

Speakers will come from disciplines such as law, communications and media studies, international relations and Asian studies.


Seminar: Neo-Liberalsim and the Self as Enterprise
11 December 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Associate Professor Peter Kelly, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Magic, Savage and Barbarian: Towards an Unpacking of the Backgrounds of an Anthropological Concept
6 December 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar by Richard Sutcliffe, School of Humanities and Social Science, Deakin University, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series. His paper is a critical exploration of the interrelationship between the concepts of magic and modernity in modern anthropology and social theory. It argues that this relationship has been fundamentally misconceived and that this misconception has far reaching implications concerning the understanding of modernity. On this basis, the paper proceeds to suggest an alternative approach that points towards a critical reconstruction the extensive historiography of magic as a significant counter-tradition within modern social imaginaries.

For further information, please contact Gillian G. Tan at gillian.tan@deakin.edu.au.


Seminar: What is social value? Reflecting on 20 years of practice
28 November 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by Chris Johnston, Director, Context Pty Ltd and Honorary Fellow, Deakin University.

For further information, please contact Dr Steven Cooke on 03 9244 6827 or email: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Conference: Contemporary History, the past that's still with us.
29-30 November 2012

The Contemporary Histories Research Group in the Alfred Deakin Research Institute invites papers from postgraduates, early career researchers, and others, from any field of Contemporary History, and from any related discipline (Politics, International Studies etc.) who would like to participate in a discussion about the nature of Contemporary History, and the problems of researching and writing Contemporary History.

Learn more about this conference.


Seminar: Dutch Disease or an “Australian Enlightenment”: Living with the Multi-Speed Economy
27 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Professor Michael Porter, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Symposium: Heritage in Times of Transformation: A special one-day symposium in honour of Professor Bill Logan
19 and 20 November 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific (CHCAP), in association with the Alfred Deakin Research Institute, is hosted a special symposium to honour the achievements of Professor Bill Logan as he approaches his official retirement from Deakin University. Professor Logan was the inaugural Director of CHCAP in 2002 and oversaw its development into one of the most vibrant and highly regarded research centres in the region. A cultural geographer, he has been recognised nationally and internationally for his contributions to the development of heritage studies, particularly for his contribution to our understanding of heritage issues both in Australia and in Vietnam.

The Symposium will open with a special keynote address by Professor Logan on the evening of the 19th of November at the Experimedia Room at the State Library of Victoria. This will be followed by a one day symposium to be held at the Burwood Campus of Deakin University on the 20th of November featuring three keynote addresses, the first from Dr Tim Winter, a senior Research Fellow from the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney, the second from Dr Gamini Wijesuriya, project Manager (Sites Unit) at ICCROM in Rome and the third from Professor Brenda Trofanenko from Acadia University, Canada.

Download the Program, Speaker Abstracts and Biographies

For further information, please contact A/Professor Andrea Witcombe at: andrea.witcomb@deakin.edu.au


Panel Discussion: Sports Journalists as Contemporary Historians
19 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institutes Contemporary Histories Research Group presented two of Australias most respected sports journalists Greg Baum and Gideon Haigh reflecting on their leading contributions to the writing of contemporary sports history.

Australia enjoys a strong tradition of journalists and commentators not only reporting and analysing the news but also writing what often serve as the first full-length accounts of contemporary history. While the political sphere has been well-served by prominent figures from Alan Reid and Hugh Lunn to Paul Kelly and George Megalogenis, the world of sport is perhaps the most prolific and popular genre for journalists publishing books. Indeed, many sports journalists wear a second hat as historians to write (or ghost-write) pathbreaking accounts of contemporary history. In doing so, they can fundamentally shape the direction of further scholarship and frame the key issues and arguments in future historiography. The importance of sports journalists, then, lies not just in the stories they uncover and being first to print but also in the ways in which they come to define the contours of debates that follow. Also, unlike historians of the future they often have enjoyed access to key players of the time while experiencing events from close quarters. Consequentially, the influential work of sports journalists/historians deserves special consideration by the broader historical profession.

The distinguished sports journalists Greg Baum and Gideon Haigh will discuss their respective
contributions to the first draft of history. Warwick Hadfield, Deakin Universitys Research Promotions and Communications Manager and the Sports Commentator on ABC Radio Nationals Breakfast program, will act as facilitator. There will be ample Q&A time to allow audience participation.

Greg Baum is Chief Sports Columnist and Associate Editor with The Age. He has authored, co-authored, or co-edited several sports books including Greg Baum The Waugh Era (ABC Books, Sydney, 2004). Gideon Haigh has three decades of experience as an independent journalist and author. Arguably the worlds pre-eminent cricket writer, his most recent publication is Gideon Haigh On Warne (Penguin, Melbourne, 2012).

For further information, please contact Dr Tony Joel at: tony.joel@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Ethical Implications of Nuclear Weapons, Proliferation and Nuclear Energy
13 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Adam Broinowski, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Presentation: The You Yangs in Historical Perspective
12 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a presentation byMs Heather Threadgold.

This presentation explores how the You Yangs were utilized by the Wathaurong Tribe. It considers the significance of the area's unique blend of natural resources, including food and water sources, which enabled permanent camp sites. The Wathaurong people thrived among surrounding abundant swampland and animal life - with roaming emu and kangaroo - while using the shelter of caves. And what can we learn from local sacred grounds including a nearby stone circle arrangement?

Matthew Flinders and John Batman among others recorded their visits to the You Yangs during early European contact. The You Yangs were described as a vantage point in the exploration of Corio Bay, along with sightings and observations of the last of the free-living Wathaurong. Drawing on these diary excerpts as well as artist companion drawings, Heather focuses on natural ecological representations of the region and questions how these historical perspectives continue to shape and reflect how we visualise the You Yangs today.

What is the historical significance of the You Yangs in tying together the Wathaurong territory? Through the utilisation of maps, photographs, and various illustrations, this presentation aims to provide the audience with a visual appreciation of how the You Yangs and surrounding area once looked like and how it has evolved particularly since the time of white settlement. Did you know, for instance, in the past the Wathaurong could expand their natural resources by walking across Corio Bay from the You Yangs to Point Henry?

Today, the You Yangs are the gateway to Wathaurong territory, Geelong, and the tourism trail of the Great Ocean Road. The presentation concludes by looking at ways in which the You Yangs can be better used to encourage schools, visitors, and the wider public to learn about the region's past.

The findings presented by Heather stem from archival and field research she recently conducted as part of a History Internship completed at the You Yangs Recreational Reserve, organised by Deakin University in collaboration with Parks Victoria.


Public Lecture: Impact Evaluations in International Development: Using Rigorous Evidence for Better Policies
5 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, together with Sustineo Pty Ltd, hosted a public lecture by Howard White.

Dr White is Executive Director of the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) and Adjunct Professor of International Development at the Alfred Deakin Research Institute of Deakin University.

As you may be aware, Dr White is a leading international authority on impact evaluations conducted in the field of international development. Prior to taking his position at 3ie Dr White led the impact evaluation rogramme of the World Bank's Independent Evaluation Group. Howard has worked extensively on development-related issues in countries across Africa and Asia and has published over 60 papers in internationally refereed journals and several books, focusing on aid effectiveness and poverty reduction. He is Managing Editor of the Journal of Development Studies and the Journal of Development Effectiveness. He has taught at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague and the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, and continues to engage worldwide via workshops and training opportunities for policymakers on topics related to development effectiveness and impact evaluation.


Symposium: Critical Junctures in Asia and the Pacific
9 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, in association with the Faculty of Arts and Education, hosted a symposium that will bring together ADRI members who are engaged in research concerned with states and societies in Asia and the Pacific region that are experiencing a moment of 'critical juncture'.

The concept of critical juncture is often associated with societies at a crossroads. It usually entails choices that are, or must be, made as a range of forces come to bear on local groups and communities: it marks a transition in which 'what was' will be radically different from 'what will be'.

This symposium aims to probe more deeply at these concerns. Where are the crossroads located? Do different methodological applications, such as longitudinal studies, affect how the crossroads are defined? What insights can we draw from theoretical models, such as critical transitions in ecology?

By drawing on research that focuses on processes of change and a broader understanding of social relations from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, we hope to contribute to discussions on critical junctures in the Asia and Pacific. These discussions will be in small-group 'roundtables' around themes including, but not limited to: political transitions; urban development; cultural heritage; environmental challenges; demographic factors; gender relations; planning; and new technologies.

ADRI members who would like to participate in this symposium are invited to submit a paper, around 4000 words of publishable standard, two weeks before the date of the symposium (ie. Friday, 26 October 2012). The paper should address how their work engages with the idea of critical juncture, with particular reference to societies and nations in the region.

At the symposium, they will then be asked to present a brief oral summary of their paper for discussion in the small groups. A rapporteur will be assigned to each group, with the responsibility to summarise and report on the points discussed at the plenary session. The symposium will end with a wider discussion on themes and directions for future research.

For further information, please contact Dr Gillian Tan at gillian.tan@deakin.edu.au or Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: What was Philosophical about Natural Philosophy?
30 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Professor Peter Harrison, from the University of Queensland, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: New Chinese Histories of Australia and the Pacific and why they should matter to Australian Policy-Makers
30 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Ms Sophie Loy-Wilson, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Affectivity and darkness; impressions of the Museum of Old and New Art
31 October 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by Dr Janice Baker, Deakin University

For further information, please contact Dr Steven Cooke on 03 9244 6827 or email: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Lecture: Turkey: morality vs. national security. The interconnection between security, democracy and history facing the Middle East
1 November 2012

A Public Lecture delivered by Taner Akcam discussing that the pitting of 'national interes't against morality as mutually exclusive is just plain wrong. Akcam will argue that any security policy in the Middle East that excludes 'morality' cannot ultimately be a realistic policy that will work, and that eventually it undermines national security. There is a strong interconnection between security, democracy and facing history in the Middle East. So therefore morality is a very real issue, and the acknowledgment of historic wrong doings must be integrated into a policy of national security.

For further information, please contact Donna Frieze at donna-lee.frieze@deakin.edu.au


Workshop: Intellectual property and cultural property: Rights discourses in the Asia-Pacific region
1-2 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, School of Law and Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific at Deakin University presented this workshop examining the various notions of property, in particular cultural property and intellectual property, and how they are employed in rights discourses in the Asia-Pacific region. Case studies will focus on Asia, Australia and North America.

In Asia, decentralisation policies following the Asian Financial Crisis of 1997/98 have led to a renewed focus on local identities and a revival of customary laws. In Asia as well as in Australia and North America, indigenous peoples have linked their struggle for recognition of their cultural identity and customary laws in an international indigenous movement that has become increasingly vocal.

International organisations such as UNESCO, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Convention on Biological Diversity under the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) have addressed aspects of these rights discourses in their various portfolios. National governments increasingly try to implement international model solutions and adjust them to local circumstances and the requirements of local communities.

Discussions about the relationship between various forms of property, heritage and culture go back a long time, but have gathered momentum since the decolonisation movement after World War II. The workshop will examine intellectual and cultural property in this context as property concepts which are used sometimes in connection with each other and at other times in a contradicting manner. In addition, it will also explore other forms of 'property' and 'rights' suggested as alternatives in the discussions.
Speakers will come from law and various social science disciplines such as heritage studies, Asian studies and anthropology.

Convener: Prof. Christoph Antons, School of Law, Deakin University


Seminar: Re-examining Human-nonhuman Relationships among Tibetan nomads, or Analogism in Eastern Tibet
1 November 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar by Gillian G. Tan, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Gillian Tan at gillian.tan@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: How smart can Geelong be in tackling young people's disadvantage?
24 October 2012

As part of the Smart Geelong Network's Research and Innovation Expo

A forum hosted by the Alfred Deakin Research Institute

Panellists

* Dr Perri Campbell (Alfred Deakin Research Institute)
* Associate Professor Lyn Harrison (School of Education, Deakin University)
* Professor Christopher Hickey (School of Education, Deakin University)
* Associate Professor Peter Kelly (Alfred Deakin Research Institute)
* Mr Ken Massari (College Assistant Principal Retention, Northern Bay P-12 College)
* Ms Anne-Marie Ryan (Executive Officer, Geelong Region Local Learning and
Employment Network [LLEN])


Seminar: General Ethics and the Theory of Responsive Cohesion
16 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Professor Warwick Fox, from the University of Central Lancashire, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Developing a Research Framework Policy: How Post-War Research Legitimised Australian Governance
16 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Hannah Forsyth, University of Sydney, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Adorno after Kiefer
9 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar by Dr Geoff Boucher, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: The Spirit of Development and the Anthropology of Spirit: Kant, Hegel and Madonna in Malawi
4 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar by Alan Thorold, School of Humanities and Social Science, Deakin University, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series.


Seminar: Parody and Truth in Nietzsche’s Genealogy
2 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Dr Andrew Inkpin, from The University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Fractured Lives, Digital Selves: Women and Warblogs in post-Invasion Iraq
2 October 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Perri Campbell, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Measuring the deconstruction of heritage and spikes of violence in Iraq
26 September 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by Dr Ben Isakhan, Deakin University.

For further information, please contact Dr Steven Cooke on 03 9244 6827 or email: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Power, Government and Strategy: Foucault’s Reconsideration of Power after 1976
18 September 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Professor Paul Patton, from the University of New South Wales, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Challenging heteronormativity through football and education: Activism and/or Assimilation?
17 September 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute is hosted a seminar by Dr Jayne Caudwell, Principal Lecturer, Brighton University.

The Justin Campaign (UK-based voluntary organisation) seeks to celebrate the life of Justin Fashanu and challenge discrimination based on sexuality and gender identity at all levels of the game of football. It was established on 2nd May, 2008, ten years after the young black British, openly gay footballer, took his own life. Since its inception, The Justin Campaign has successfully worked with local (schools, youth clubs, prisons), national (city Prides, colleges and universities) and international groups (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender groups and football clubs) to promote inclusion and equality; specifically, to raise awareness of LGBT issues within football cultures and football communities.

As participant volunteer Director of Education for the campaign, I have organised and delivered activities, events and projects for and with young people. In this paper, I focus on two specific events: 'Tackle Homophobia' young men's football team and their participation at CupDenmark 2012 (July 26th-29th) and the 'Justin Student Football Festival' at the University of Brighton (May 2nd, 2012).

Despite both events receiving glowing reports and positive feedback from participants, I take a reflexive-turn to explore the extent to which non-normative sexualities, in these football contexts, work to challenge prevailing structures of sexuality (heteronormativity). From my (privileged) position as feminist-queer scholar, I ask now-familiar questions concerning the relationships and tensions between activism and assimilation.

Jayne is Course Leader for BA(hons) Sport Studies & BA(hons) Sport Studies with Physical Education. She was acting Programme Leader (2011-2012) for Sport and Leisure Cultures Area (BA Sport Journalism; BA Sport and Leisure Management; BA Sport Studies & BA Sport Studies with Physical Education). She teaches socio-cultural approaches to sport and leisure and engages with qualitative research methodologies, gender theory and theories of sexuality. Jayne has written on sports
such as football, boxing and rowing and she is editor of Sport, Sexualities and Queer/Theory, Women's Football in the UK: Continuing with Gender Analyses, and co-editor of Sexualities, Spaces and Leisure Studies.

Read more about Jayne's presentation here.


Seminar: Nietzsche’s Politics of the Event
11 September 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Professor Vanessa Lemm, from the University of New South Wales, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Re-imagining relationships, re-imagining rights: enacting the imaginary among Kubo of Papua New Guinea
6 September 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar by Monica Minnegal, School of Social and Political Sciences and Peter Dwyer, Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series.


Seminar: Tubal Sterilization in India
4 September 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Samba Pasupuleti, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Messianic sovereignty: reading Nietzsche with Benjamin
4 September 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Dr Justine McGill, from La Trobe University, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Deakin Week

After the Year of the Protestor: Young People, Social Media and new forms of Democracy

In recent years, both in Australia and abroad, we've seen young people finding new and innovative ways of communicating opinions and ideas, challenging traditional thinking and creating new methods of activism. In the wake of Kony 2012, the Occupy Movement and the Arab Spring, are we bearing witness to new cultures of democracy?

Speakers included:

Mr Sam McLean, Deputy National Director, GetUp! Australia
Mr McLean joined GetUp in 2007 as a volunteer and has recently been appointed the new National Director of the organisation. GetUp is an independent community organisation giving everyday Australians opportunities to get involved and hold politicians accountable on important issues. Whether it is sending an email to an MP, engaging with the media, attending an event or helping to get a television ad on the air, GetUp's 600,000 members take targeted, coordinated and strategic action.

Ms Jan Owen AM, Chief Executive Officer, Foundation for Young Australians
Ms Owen is a pioneer of the youth sector in Australia. She is a highly regarded social entrepreneur, innovator and child and youth advocate. She has previously held various leadership roles across the sector and currently serves on the boards of several youth, gender, health and social investment organisations.

Associate Professor Peter Kelly, Principal Research Fellow in Social Science, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University
Associate Professor Kelly is a social theorist/social researcher who has published extensively on young people, the practice of youth studies; social theory and globalisation.

Dr Perri Campbell, Research Fellow, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University
Dr Campbell's research interest lies at the crossroads of gender studies, critical social theory, media and youth studies, in particular, she focusses on the use of digital communication technologies in post-conflict zones, most notably Iraq.


Seminar: Muse/Museal - a fashion exhibition and a grotto
29 August 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by Elizabeth Anya-Petrivina, National Trust of Australia (Victoria)/RMIT.

For further information, please contact Dr Steven Cooke on 03 9244 6827 or email: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Eclipse of Practical Reason
21 August 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Dr George Duke, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Environment and Religiosity on the Tibetan Plateau, or, How to Love a Yak
21 August 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Dr Gillian Tan, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: Divided minds, selves, egos and internal objects
14 August 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Dr Tamas Pataki, from The University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Sean Bowden at: sean.bowden@deakin.edu.au

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: The Impact of Remittances in Small Island Developing States
7 August 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a seminar by Associate Professor Simon Feeny and Dr Sasi Iamsiraroj, as part of the 2012 Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au


Seminar: The Art of Time
7 August 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Associate Professor Erin Manning, from Concordia Unicersity, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Laughing/crying/thinking: the dilemma of Islamic oratory
6 August 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar Julian Millie, School of Political and Social Inquiry, Monash University, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series.


Seminar: Expressive Agency in Deleuze’s Logic of Sense
31 July 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hostied a seminar by Dr Sean Bowden, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: In Popper’s Midrash: Is Karl Popper a Jewish philosopher?
24 July 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hostied a seminar by Alexander Naraniecki, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: A taste of ashes: vengefulness and impossible reciprocity in Beauvoir
17 July 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hostied a seminar by Dr Marguerite La Caze, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: Bonhoeffer: Kierkegaard’s ‘single individual’ in a ‘state of exception’
10 July 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted a seminar by Petra Brown, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Philosophy Seminar Series.

2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series Full Program


Seminar: From epitheatrical text to epitheatrical space: an anthropologist in nineteenth century Beijing
5 July 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted a seminar by Dr Mark Stevenson, School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Victoria University, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series.


Seminar: Negotiating veterans heritage in the lead up to the centenary of World War I
27 June 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by Dr Marina Larsson (Veterans unit, Department of Planning and Community Development).


Deakin Policy Forum: Living within the Multi-Speed Economy: The Opportunities and Adjustments with Resource Development
25 June

Australia is enjoying a period of economic growth associated with the development of its natural resourceendowments. This has led to an historic rise in Australia's terms and trade. Along with this growth have come structural adjustment pressures and a range of associated challenges. This seminar, through presentations from some of Australia's leading political, policy and academic leaders, will consider the opportunities and adjustments associated with resources development.

The Deakin Policy Forum also featured the launch of a landmark report by Deloitte Access Economics, the Economic Contribution of the Australian Oil and Gas Industry, which examines the key role the growth of Australia's oil and gas industry will play in Australia's future economic development and resillience to a challenging international environment.

Panel of Speakers
The Hon Ian Macfarlane MP; Mr Gary Banks AO, Chairman, Productivity Commission; Mr David Byers, Chief Executive, Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association; Professor Warwick McKibbin, Director, Research School of Economics, Australian National University; Mr Chris Richadson, Director, Deloitte Access Economics.


Deakin Policy Forum: New Developments in China: Political, Economic and Education
18 June

This Deakin Policy Forum, hosted jointly by the Alfred Deakin Research Institute and the ANZ Bank was an informal discussion on developments, challenges and opportunities emerging in the economies, the educational systems and in technology, in our respective countries, in what has recently been described as the 'Third Industrial Revolution'.

Panel of Speakers
Dr Geoff Raby AO, Former Ambassador to China; Mr Rowan Callick, Asia Pacific Editor, The Australian, Dr David Gruen, Executive Director, Macroeconomic Group, Australian Treasury and; Ms Amy Auster, Chief of Staff, CEO Asia Pacific, Europe and Americas, ANZ Bank.


Seminar: The end(s) of the road: governance, development and incomplete infrastructure on Malakula, Vanuatu
7 June 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences is hosting a seminar by Dr Benedicta Rousseau, McArthur Research Fellow, The University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin University Anthropology Seminar Series.


Seminar: The heritage of Melbourne's water supply
30 May 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hostes a seminar by Dr Helen Doyle (consultant Historian).


Seminar: Thinking time and change via Deleuze
15 May 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Antonia Pont, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Seminar: Care and selfhood in Heidegger's Being and Time
8 May 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Simon Lumsden, University of New South Wales, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Seminar: The 'Origins's of European Fascism. Memory and Violence in Michael Haneke's The White Ribbon
1 May 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Magdalena Zolkos, University of Western Sydney, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Seminar: Conformity to Law in Kant's 3rd Critique
24 April 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Justin Clemens, University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Seminar: Remembering the Holocaust and forgetting Genocide in Britain
24 April 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by PrDr Tom Lawson (University of Winchester, UK).


Deakin Policy Forum: ‘Media Wars and Digital Laws: Facts, Fears and Finkelstein’
24 April 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted a Breakfast Forum as part of the Deakin Policy Forum (DPF).

Speakers: Professor Julian Disney AO, Chairman of the Australian Press Council; Mr Tony Walker, International Editor, The Australian Financial Review; Professor Henry Ergas,; Correspondent for The Australian and  Professor of Economics, University of  Wollongong; Mr John Roskam, CEO, Institute of Public Affairs and; Associate Professor Martin Hirst, Associate Professor in Journalism, Deakin University.


Seminar: For a Philosophy of the Market: The case of Elie Ayache
17 April 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a hosting a seminar by Dr Jon Roffe, University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Conference: Papua New Guinea: Securing a Prosperous Future
12-13 April 2012

A two-day conference exploring the opportunities and challenges for a Papua New Guinea seeking security and prosperity.  The conference was hosted by the Alfred Deakin Research Institute in partnership with the Parliamentary Secretary for Pacific Island Affairs, Richard Marles MP, and was supported by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and AusAID.


Seminar: The mind as an idea in Spinoza's Short Treatise
3 April 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Colin Marshall, University of Melbourne, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Seminar: Our heritage report card: The State of the Australian Environment 2006-2011
28 March 2012

The Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific hosted a seminar by Professor Richard Mackay AM (Partner of Godden Mackay Logan Heritage Consultants and Adjunct Professor in the Archaeology Program at La Trobe University).


Seminar: Reading Hadot via Costa Lima: Philosophy as a Way of Life and "the Control of the Imaginary"
27 March 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Matthew Sharpe as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Deakin Policy Forum: Changing Fashions in Public Sector Governance
22 March 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the ANZ Bank hosted a Breakfast Forum as part of the Deakin Policy Forum (DPF).

Speakers: Terry Moran, Former Secretary, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet Under Prime Ministers, Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard.  
Discussants: Professor Alan Fels, AO, Director, ANZSOG and former Chairman of the ACCC; John Roskam, CEO, The Institute of Public Affairs and; David Byrne, Director, Infrastructure and Utilities ANZ Bank.


Seminar: Time, Philosophy and Cronopathologies
20 March 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Jack Reynolds, La Trobe University, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Seminar: Historicist objections to the centrality of work, and a tentative rejoinder
14 March 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Associate Professor Jean-Philippe Deranty, Macquarie University, as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Workshop: Australia, Nationalism and Transnationalism: Australianness and Beyond
9 March 2012

This workshop re-examined a history of Australian nationalism in all its many manifestations: civic, political, cultural, and ethnic.  Paying attention to inclusions and exclusions those connected to race, gender and ethnicity, for example it will explore evolving understandings of Australian nationalism across various political and cultural frameworks, including colonial, imperial and Commonwealth.  At a time when so many Australian historians are engaged in comparative and transnational studies, this workshop will contribute towards writing the nation back into the Australian story, while also contemplating the international and historical consequences of that undertaking.


Seminar: The Naked Self: Some Kiergegaardian Contributions to Analytic Philosopy of Personal Identity
6 March 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Dr Patrick Stokes as part of the 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar Series.


Fusion Lecture: 'Measuring structural vulnerability at the country level: why and how?'
5 March 2012

Professor Patrick Guillaumont, Président of the Fondation pour les Etudes et Recherches sur le Développement International (FERDI) presented the third Fusion Lecture.

The Fusion Lecture Series features prominent thinkers on current public policy issues, and is named in recognition of the intellectual and political legacy of Alfred Deakin, Australia's second Prime Minister and a leading figure in Australian federation (Deakin led a 'fusion' government, comprised of groups that would soon afterwards become the first Australian Liberal Party, in 1909-10).The Fusion lectures draw inspiration from Alfred Deakin in bringing different disciplines to bear in interpreting and responding to global and regional change.


Seminar: Inaugural 2012 Deakin Philosophy Seminar
28 February 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Centre for Citizenship and Globalization and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted a seminar by Professor Jim Hopkins, Kings College London.


In Conversation with Professor Jim Hopkins: 'Psychoanalysis, Neuroscience and Psychoanalytic Method'
25 February 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute together with the Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation hosted an In Conversation Event with Professor Jim Hopkins.


Presentation: Musical Transitions Project
17 February 2012

Dr Katherine Butler Scholfield and Dr David Irving of King's College, London, spoke about the Musical Transitions project, a four-year research programme (2011-2014) funded by the European Research Council and based in the Music Department at King’s College London.


Book Launch: 'Australia and Appeasement' by Dr Christopher Waters
15 February 2012

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted the launch of the latest book by Dr Christopher Waters 'Australia and Appeasement'. The book was launched by Professor David Lowe. 

Read more about 'Australia and Appeasement'


Conference: 'What do we want as our Head of State?'
4 February 2012

A conference on the role of the Australian Head of State, both now and into the future.

Download flyer


Deakin Policy Forum: 'The State of the Economic Policy Debate'
2 December 2011

This inaugural Deakin Policy Forum (DPF) looked at ‘The State of the Economic Policy Debate’ including 'The state of the Economics Profession and Treasuries'. The lead speakers were Professors Henry Ergas and Judith Sloan, both frequent writers on wide-ranging policy issues and lively contributors to the economic debate.


Book Launch: Latest volumes in the Routledge Key Issues in Cultural Heritage Series
30 November 2011

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute, together with the Cultural Heritage Centre for Asia and the Pacific and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences hosted the launch of the latest volumes in the Routledge Key Issues in Cultural Heritage Series. The volumes were officially launched by Professor Andrew Reeves, Monash University and Professor Lee Astheimer, DVC (Research) Deakin University.

The Heritage of War
(Editors Martin Gegner & Bart Ziino) and Heritage, Labour & the Working Classes (Editors Laurajane Smith, Paul Shackell & Gary Campbell).


Conference: Hard Labor? The Crisis of Social Democracy in the Australian State Level
5 November 2011

A one day conference that combined academic and practitioner comment on the experience of state Labor administrations with particular reference to New South Wales and Victoria.


Workshop and Public Lecture: 'What role can and should religion play in a modern nation?'
22 September 2011

A one day workshop on Religion and the Nation, followed by a Public Lecture, delivered by Greg Sheridan, Foreign Editor for The Australian.


Seminar: 'Yes, I am a Baby Boomer, but it's not my fault'
8 September 2011

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute hosted the sixth annual 'It's not my faulty forum' on 8 September 2011. Actor/singer/comedian and novelist Jane Clifton, Professor David Walker and Dr Kim Toffoletti spoke on the topic 'Yes, I am a baby boomer but it's not my fault'.

The event was recorded by ABC Radio National and was aired on 9am, Monday 3 October on the Life Matters program. The frequency for Radio National is 621 on the AM dial for listeners in Melbourne and Geelong and for Warrnambool it is 101.7 on FM. It is also available to download as a podcast.


Panel Discussion: 'Getting under the skin of immigration'
3 August 2011

Panel Discussion by the Hon. Dr Barry Jones AO, Professor Fazal Rizvi, Dr Benjamin Isakhan and Professor David Lowe

As part of DeakinWeek, this prominent group of leading minds convened to discuss and debate multiculturalism and immigration exploring interrelated issues such as immigration’s educational, social, political and economic effects, and attempt richer contextualisation of Australia’s experience of immigration.


Symposium: PNG Today - And Tomorrow?
27 May 2011

Papua New Guinea’s place and status in the Pacific region is undergoing a historic shift through its growth in population and the development of its natural resources. For Australians, this transition will require our own transformation.  How should we respond to PNG’s growing influence in the region?

The Parliamentary Secretary for Pacific Island Affairs, the Hon. Richard Marles MP, invited the Alfred Deakin Research Institute to convene a symposium aimed at facilitating discussion on these important developments in our region. 

Fusion Lecture: 'Two World Wars and the Meaning of the 20th Century'
19 April 2011

The Fusion lecture Series features prominent thinkers on current public policy issues, and is named in recognition of the intellectual and political legacy of Alfred Deakin, Australia's second Prime Minister and a leading figure in Australian federation (Deakin led a 'fusion' government, comprised of groups that would soon afterwards become the first Australian Liberal Party, in 1909-10).The Fusion lectures draw inspiration from Alfred Deakin in bringing different disciplines to bear in interpreting and responding to global and regional change.


Conference: 'Public Diplomacy in Theory and Practice: Culture, Information and Interpretation in Australian-Indian Relations'
8-9 April 2011

A two day International Conference held at the India International Centre, New Delhi, co-ordinated by Professor David Lowe, Director, Alfred Deakin Research Institute and Dr Amit Sarwal, Department of English, Rajdhani College, New Delhi.


Official Opening of the Alfred Deakin Research Institute
29 March 2011

The Alfred Deakin Research Institute and the Alfred Deakin Prime Ministerial Library was officially opened by Hon Simon Crean MP, Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government; Minister for the Arts.

Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

18th August 2014