Alfred Deakin Research Institute

Upcoming Events

Event cancelled - to be rescheduled at a later date

Book Launch: Australia and the Vietnam War by Peter Edwards
24th July 2014

The Vietnam War was Australia's longest and most controversial military commitment of the twentieth century, ending in humiliation for the United States and its allies with the downfall of South Vietnam. The war provoked deep divisions in Australian society and politics, particularly since for the first time young men were conscripted for overseas service in a highly contentious ballot system. The Vietnam era is still identified with diplomatic, military and political failure.

Was Vietnam a case of Australia fighting 'other people's wars' ? Were we really 'all the way' with the United States? How valid was the 'domino theory'? Did the Australian forces develop new tactical methods in earlier Southeast Asian conflicts, and just how successful were they against the unyielding enemy in Vietnam?

In this landmark book, award-winning historian Peter Edwards skillfully unravels the complexities of the global Cold War, decolonisation in Southeast Asia, and Australian domestic politics to provide new, often surprising, answers to these questions. From the Cabinet room in Canberra to the Viet Cong strongholds in Phuoc Tuy province, Australia and the Vietnam War provides fresh insights drawn from three decades of work by the historians and researchers who produced the highly acclaimed Official History of Australia's Involvement in Southeast Asian Conflicts 1948-1975. Told through the experiences of politicians, diplomats, military leaders, protesters, and soldiers and their families, this book is much more than a war history: it is a major contribution to understanding Australia as it faces the challenges of the twenty-first century.

Peter Edwards was the Official Historian and general editor of the nine-volume Official History of Australia's Involvement in Southeast Asian Conflicts 1948-1975. He was also the author of the volumes dealing with politics, strategy and diplomacy, Crises and Commitments (1992) and A Nation at War (1997). His other books include Robert Marsden Hope and Australian Public Policy (2011), Arthur Tange: Last of the Mandarins (2006), Permanent Friends? Historical Reflections on the Australian-American Alliance (2005), and Prime Ministers and Diplomats (1983). Currently an Adjunct Professor at the Alfred Deakin Research Institute of Deakin University, he is a Member of the Order of Australia, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of International Affairs, and a former Trustee of the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne.

Rowan Callick, Asia-Pacific Editor for The Australian will be launching the book.

6 for 6.30pm
Readings
701 Glenferrie Rd
Hawthorn

Contact adri-events@deakin.edu.au to RSVP by Friday 18th July.



ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars
: Liminal States: (Post)colonialism and the Politics of Asylum in Australia's Regional Resettlement Arrangement
29 July 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Victoria Stead will be presenting.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
ad1.109

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: States of Conservation: Protection, Politics and Pacting within UNESCO's World Heritage Committee
30th July 2014

Presenter: Prof. Lynn Meskell, Stanford University, USA and Thinker-in-Residence, Deakin University

Abstract:

The title, States of Conservation, deliberately references the two 'states' that today occupy critical yet oppositional nodes within UNESCO's 1972 Convention and its conservation agenda. It recalls the State of Conservation reports commissioned by the World Heritage Center in conjunction with its Advisory Bodies that relay the condition of World Heritage properties to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee. But more critically, 'states' here also refers to the most powerful, emergent players in World Heritage site inscription and protection processes — the States Parties or member states of the 1972 Convention. In this talk I contend that as the rush for World Heritage inscription increases and economic and geo-political pacting between nations intensifies, the resources, concerns and commitments for conservation of sites already inscribed dramatically declines. I trace the national economic interests, international political pacting, and voting blocs through which particular countries increasingly set the World Heritage agenda and recast UNESCO as an agency for global branding rather than global conservation.

Biography:

Lynn Meskell is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Archaeology Center at Stanford University. She received her BA (Hons) First Class and the University Medal from the University of Sydney in 1994. For her Phd in Archaeology (1994-1997), she was awarded the Kings College scholarship from Cambridge University. She held the Salvesen Junior Research Fellowship at New College, Oxford University (1997-1999) before accepting a position at Columbia University in New York City where she became Professor in 2005. From that time onwards she has been Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and Honorary Professor at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. In 1999 she founded the Journal of Social Archaeology, for which she serves as Editor. She has been awarded grants and fellowships including those from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Australian Research Council, the American Academy in Rome, the School of American Research and Deakin University. Some of her recent books and edited collections include Embedding Ethics (2005, Berg) and Cosmopolitan Archaeologies (2009, Duke UP) and The Nature of Culture: The New South Africa (2012, Blackwells). Her new research focuses on the role of UNESCO in terms of heritage rights, sovereignty and international politics.

5:30pm
Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Meeting Room 3

DINNER: The seminar will be followed by dinner around 7 p.m. at Bar Humbug. Please RSVP for dinner booking.

Contact Yamini Narayanan at y.narayanan@deakin.edu.au


HDR Workshop: Writing to be Read
5th August and 5th September

This programme, comprising of 2 workshops a month apart, is aimed at those who are thinking about improving their writing and communicating their research to a broader audience. In the first instance, the programme is open to all currently-enrolled higher degree by research students in the Faculty of Arts and Education.  

The workshop features:

  • Dennis Glover, columnist, speechwriter  
  • Jennifer Kloester, biographer, novelist  
  • John Watson, The Conversation

Part I: Producing a Readable Thesis/Book with Dr. John Hirst  
5 August, Melbourne

How can PhD students write academically rigorous theses which captivate broad audiences beyond the assessors who are paid to read them? How can students turn good theses into successful books?  John Hirst, one of Australia's most eminent historians who has published some 15 books, will answer these questions in this interactive workshop. Students should bring an appetite to practice the art of writing or, as will often be the case, re-writing.    

Part II: Producing non-Academic Writing: 
5 September, Geelong

How can PhD students communicate the importance of the research beyond the academy? The workshop draws on the knowledge of those who have made the transition from academic publishing to newspapers, online forums, documentaries, speechwriting and books for general audience. This workshop requires participants to draw on the skills learnt from workshop 1 and submit short pieces of captivating writing as a first task (and if demand exceeds available places, participants will be chosen according to the order of received submissions). In the course of discussing their submissions with a panel of experts who have made the transition from academic to broader audiences, participants will:

A - Gain a better understanding of the difference between academic and non-academic writing, hopefully sharpening both in the process.   
B - Learn successful ways to 'pitch' their research and ideas to media and other non-academic forums.
C - Explore the possibilities of transitioning from niche to broader/trade publishers.
D - Develop a richer understanding of the power of words in a political setting. 

5th August
2-4pm
Melbourne City Campus
Level 3
550 Bourke Street
Conference Room

5th September
10am-5pm
Waterfront Campus
Geelong
Western Beach Room

For further information, email: robyn.ficnerski@deakin.edu.au


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Ukraine and Russia: Entangled Histories and Contemporary Tensions
12 August 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Filip Slaveski will be presenting.

12pm-1pm
ad5.005 at the Waterfront Campus
ic1.108 at the Waurn Ponds Campus
C2.05 at the Burwood Campus

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Improving the Use of Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health Services in Rural and Pastoralist Ethiopia
26 August 2014

Presented by Research Fellow, Dr Ruth Jackson

lEthiopia's commitment to achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 is demonstrated by efforts to improve access to and strengthen facility-based Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH) services, and by increasing institutional deliveries by skilled health workers. As one of the least urbanized countries in the world, Ethiopia aims to improve access to health services to rural and pastoralist populations through a decentralized health system.

This paper examines the role of Health Extension Workers (HEWs) in providing key MNCH services at the community (kebele) level including clean and safe delivery, and communication with a referral center. The referral system is seen as the key to reducing the delays that currently contribute to maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The question the paper addresses is: To what extent can HEWs reduce the first delay - the recognition of birth complications and the decision to seek medical care?

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
ad1.109

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: Recent  approaches to consideration of heritage amendments and planning permits
27th August 2014

Presenter: Jenny Moles, Planning Panels Victoria


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Cohort Fertility Patterns by Religion in India
9 September 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Dr Samba Pasupuleti will be presenting.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
ad1.109

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI Public Seminars: Improving the Use of Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health Services in Rural and Pastoralist Ethiopia
12 September 2014

The ADRI Seminars are a lunchtime series open to the public, where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic. Deakin University's Melbourne City Campus, with its lush and stylish setting, offers a calming respite from the hustle and bustle of Melbourne's CBD.

There probably isn't a more enjoyable way to spend your lunch-break!

Presented by Research Fellow, Dr Ruth Jackson

Ethiopia's commitment to achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 is demonstrated by efforts to improve access to and strengthen facility-based Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH) services, and by increasing institutional deliveries by skilled health workers. As one of the least urbanized countries in the world, Ethiopia aims to improve access to health services to rural and pastoralist populations through a decentralized health system.

This paper examines the role of Health Extension Workers (HEWs) in providing key MNCH services at the community (kebele) level including clean and safe delivery, and communication with a referral center. The referral system is seen as the key to reducing the delays that currently contribute to maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The question the paper addresses is: To what extent can HEWs reduce the first delay - the recognition of birth complications and the decision to seek medical care?

1pm-2:30pm
Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3
550 Bourke Street

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


4th Annual PNG Symposium
14 - 15 September 2014

The 2014 Papua New Guinea symposium is the fourth in the annual series of symposia that are intended to aid communication among researchers and practitioners in PNG, Australia, and elsewhere in the region. This year, it will be held in Papua New Guinea at Pacific Adventist University.

Perhaps as never before, PNG is engaging with the world, giving rise to new and complex questions that require considered attention and discussion. Academics, practitioners, observers and commentators in PNG, Australia and around the world will participate in the symposium with presentations, papers, and panel discussions to explore and address some of these issues.

Call for Papers has been issued, and closes Friday 27th June, 2014.

For further information contact the Symposium organisers at events@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: Heritage diplomacy, and moving beyond the UNESCOization of heritage studies
24th September 2014

Presenter:

Dr. Tim Winter, Research Chair of Cultural Heritage, Deakin University

TBC

Abstract:

TBC


ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars: Remembering the Mighty Atom: The Manhattan Project National Park, USA
21 October 2014

The ADRI @ Waterfront Seminars are a lunchtime series where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic.

Professor David Lowe will be presenting.

12pm-1pm
Deakin University Waterfront Campus
Geelong
ad1.109

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


ADRI Public Seminars: PNG in WWII: The Kokoda Pilot Study
24 October 2014

The ADRI Seminars are a lunchtime series open to the public, where our researchers are given an opportunity to showcase their current project/s and encourage open and informal debate on their chosen topic. Deakin University's Melbourne City Campus, with its lush and stylish setting, offers a calming respite from the hustle and bustle of Melbourne's CBD.

There probably isn't a more enjoyable way to spend your lunch-break!

Presented by Dr Jonathan Ritchie.

1pm-2:30pm
Deakin University
Melbourne City Centre
Level 3
550 Bourke Street

For further information, please contact Dr Jonathan Ritchie at: jonathan.ritchie@deakin.edu.au.


Cultural Heritage Seminar: Holocaust exhibitions and the 'myth of silence': The 1961 Warsaw Ghetto Commemoration Exhibition, Melbourne
29 October 2014

Presenter:

Dr. Steven Cooke, Deakin University

Abstract:

This talk examines the origins, development and reception of the Warsaw Ghetto Commemoration Exhibition in Melbourne, Australia, held in April 1961. Situated within the context of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Israel and fears of racism in Australia, the exhibition is a site through which complex debates over Australian-Jewish identity and memory of the Holocaust can be understood. The exhibition was visited by over 6000 people in four days and employed a variety of contemporary museum techniques, including displays of art and material culture relating to the Holocaust, a replica 'tomb of the unknown Jewish Martyr' and 'living history' displays of life in post war Australia.

The paper shows how representations of the Holocaust were shaped by both local concerns and an emerging global network of information, artefacts, people, and institutions involved in remembrance. It explores the politics of the development of the exhibition, the poetics of its displays, the part played by survivors, and the role of other cultural and educational institutions in Melbourne. Contrasting this exhibition with another Warsaw Ghetto exhibition held in London at the same time, it examines issues of 'race', identity and belonging within the context of a rapidly changing post-colonial society, adding to a nuanced reading that unsettles the established narratives of the development of historical memory of the Holocaust in Australia.

5:30pm
Deakin City Campus
Meeting Room 3
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne

RSVP to Yamini Narayanan: y.narayanan@deakin.edu.au


Cultural Heritage Seminar: TBC
8th November 2014


Deakin University acknowledges the traditional land owners of present campus sites.

21st July 2014