Bachelor of Science

Course summary for current students

Year2017 course information
Award granted Bachelor of Science
Campus

Offered at Burwood (Melbourne), Waurn Ponds (Geelong), Warrnambool

Cloud CampusNo
Duration3 years full-time or part-time equivalent
CRICOS course code083996G
Deakin course codeS320
Approval statusThis course is approved by the University under the Higher Education Standards Framework.
Australian Quality Framework (AQF) recognitionThe award conferred upon completion is recognised in the Australian Qualifications Framework at Level 7.

Course sub-headings

Course overview

Science at Deakin is a flexible degree that allows you to explore a diverse range of science-related study areas before you choose to specialise in at least one area of interest as you progress through the course. The degree is about more than just laboratory work, and prepares you for a diverse range of real-life settings in which today's science graduates work. Majors are available in Animal Biology, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Chemistry and Materials Science, Environmental Science, Geography, Human Biology, Mathematical Modelling, Natural History and Plant Biology.

Throughout the course you’ll gain experience through practical programs undertaken in modern teaching laboratories, complete a Community Science Project and have an opportunity to undertake an Industry-Based Learning placement, which will provide you with valuable work experience before you graduate.

This course is available as a single degree or as a combined degree course with Arts, Commerce, Law and Teaching.

Units in the course may include assessment hurdle requirements.

Indicative student workload

You can expect to participate in a range of teaching activities each week. This could include classes, seminars, practicals and online interaction. You can refer to the individual unit details in the course structure for more information. You will also need to study and complete assessment tasks in your own time.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this course may find career opportunities in government institutions, in roles such as quality assurance, occupational health and safety, research, planning, management or marketing; science related industries, working in pharmaceutical production or pharmaceutical sales; biomedical science areas such as research or hospital and laboratory science; quality assurance in analytical and diagnostic laboratories; the food industry in quality control; environment and natural resources, fisheries resource management, aquaculture management, teaching, information technology, mathematics or science journalism to name a few.

Fees and charges

Fees and charges vary depending on your course, your fee category and the year you started. To find out about the fees and charges that apply to you, visit the Current students fees website.

Course Learning Outcomes

Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes (DGLOs)

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

1.  Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities: appropriate to the level of study related to a discipline or profession.

  • Apply a broad and coherent knowledge of the scientific disciplines of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and the environment within the chosen major area(s) of study to demonstrate a deep understanding of scientific facts, scientific practices and the edifice of science.
  • Apply technical knowledge and skills and use them in a range of activities, in a professional and/or academic setting within the major area(s) of study; this application of technical knowledge and skills being characterised by demonstrable in-depth knowledge of scientific methods and tools, and demonstrable proficiency in the utilisation of chosen major area(s) knowledge.
  • Use hypotheses, laws, facts and theories to investigate, test, analyse, and evaluate scientific data and demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility to argue about characteristics and aspects of scientific theory in the advancement of science.

2.  Communication: using oral, written and interpersonal communication to inform, motivate and effect change.

  • Demonstrate listening skills and the ability to use a range of communication skills to accommodate, encourage and answer audience questions.
  • Articulate the boundaries or limits of scientific information, experimental or field data, discuss error, probability, uncertainty, conclusions and arguments.
  • Judge how well to present essential details of scientific procedures, key observations, results and conclusions in a professional manner using appropriate style, language and references including local, national, and international contributions or contexts.

3.  Digital literacy: using technologies to find, use and disseminate information.

  • Use well-developed technical skills, judgement and responsibility to independently locate, analyse, evaluate the merits of, synthesise and disseminate scientific literature, information, data and results.

4.  Critical thinking: evaluating information using critical and analytical thinking and judgment.

  • Locate and evaluate scientific information from multiple sources and use scientific methods and frameworks to structure and plan observations, experimentation or fieldwork investigations.
  • Use critical and analytical thinking and judgement to analyse, synthesise and generate an integrated knowledge, formulate hypotheses and test them against evidence-based scientific concepts and principles.

5.  Problem solving: creating solutions to authentic (real world and ill-defined) problems.

  • Use initiative and creativity in planning, identifying and using multiple approaches to recognise, clarify, construct and solve problems taking into account relevant contextual factors.
  • Advocate scientific methodologies, hypotheses, laws, facts and principles to create solutions to authentic real world problems.

 

6. Self-management:          working and learning independently, and taking responsibility for personal actions.

  • Take personal, professional and social responsibility within changing professional science contexts to develop autonomy as learners and evaluate own performance.
  • Work autonomously, responsibly and safely to solve unstructured problems and actively apply knowledge of regulatory frameworks and scientific methodologies to make informed choices.

7. Teamwork: working and learning with others from different disciplines and backgrounds.

  • Work independently and collaboratively as a team to contribute towards achieving team goals and thereby demonstrate interpersonal skills including the ability to brainstorm, negotiate, resolve conflicts, managing difficult and awkward conversations, provide constructive feedback and work in diverse professional, social and cultural contexts.

8.  Global citizenship: engaging ethically and productively in the professional context and with diverse communities and cultures in a global context

  • Apply scientific knowledge and skills with a high level of autonomy, judgement, responsibility and accountability in collaboration with others to articulate the place and importance of science in the local and global community.

 Approved by Faculty Board 14 July 2016

Course rules

To complete the Bachelor of Science, students must attain 24 credit points. Most units (think of units as ‘subjects’) are equal to 1 credit point. So that means in order to gain 24 credit points, you’ll need to study 24 units (AKA ‘subjects’) over your entire degree. Most students choose to study 4 units per trimester, and usually undertake two trimesters each year.

The 24 credit points include 8 core units (these are compulsory), 10 elective units (you can choose which ones to study) and 6 units from a major study (you will be required to complete at least one major).

The course comprises a total of 24 credit points, which must include the following:

  • at least 16 credit points from science course grouped units
  • 8 core science units
  • At least one 6 credit point approved Science major sequence
  • Completion of SLE010 Laboratory and Fieldwork Safety Induction Program (0 credit-point compulsory unit)
  • Completion of STP010 Introduction to Work Placements (0 credit point unit)
  • Level 1 – up to 10 credit points
  • Level 3 - at least 6 credit points (at least 4 must be Science course grouped)

Major sequences

Refer to the details of each major sequence for availability.
Students must complete at least one major from the following areas:

 

Course structure

Core

SLE111Cells and Genes

SLE103Ecology and the Environment

SIT191Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis

SLE123Physics for the Life Sciences

SLE209History and Philosophy of Science

EES200Communicating Science

SLE352Community Science Project #

SLE010Laboratory and Fieldwork Safety Induction Program (0 credit points)

STP010Introduction to Work Placements (0 credit points)

Chemistry - choose one from:

SLE133Chemistry in Our World ^

SLE155Chemistry for the Professional Sciences ^

^Note: Students who have not completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE133 Chemistry in Our World in Trimester 1.  Students who have completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences in Trimester 2.

# Must have successfully completed STP010 Introduction to Work Placements (0 credit point unit)

Electives

Select from a range of elective units offered across many courses. In some cases you may even be able to choose elective units from a completely different discipline area (subject to meeting unit requirements).

Work experience

You will have an opportunity to undertake a discipline-specific Industry-Based Learning placement as part of your course. This will provide you with the opportunity to apply and consolidate what you are learning in your course, experience workplace culture and workplace practices, explore career options and develop a professional network before you graduate. deakin.edu.au/sebe/wil.

Details of major sequences

Animal Biology

Campuses

Burwood (Melbourne), Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000064


Overview

This major sequence provides an introduction to different aspects of animal biology including animal structure and function, evolution and evolutionary biology.


Units

SLE132Biology: Form and Function

SLE204Animal Diversity

SLE205Vertebrate Structure and Function

SLE315Comparative Animal Physiology

SLE307Behavioural Ecology (Tri-3)

plus

SLE370Evolution or

SLE372Evolutionary Ecology


 


Cell Biology

Campuses

Burwood (Melbourne), Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000065


Overview

This major sequence provides an introduction to the molecular and biochemical basis of cells, including their physiological properties, development, function and interaction with their environment. Students will also learn about the molecular basis of disease.


Units

SLE212Biochemistry *

SLE254Genetics

SLE206Cell Biology

SLE222Biochemical Metabolism

SLE346Molecular Basis of Disease

plus

SLE340Genomes and Bioinformatics or

SLE321Molecular Biology Techniques

* prerequisite unit applies (SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences)


 

Chemistry

Campus

Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000009


Overview

This major sequence provides an introduction to the synthesis, separation, detection and measurement of chemical substances, their properties and reactions.


Units

SLE210Chemistry the Enabling Science *

SLE213Introduction to Spectroscopic Principles

SLE214Organic Chemistry

SLE229Introduction to Separation Science

SLE316Analytical Chemistry

SLE318Synthetic and Medicinal Chemistry

* prerequisite unit applies (SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences)


 

Chemistry and Materials Science

Campus

Burwood (Melbourne)


Unit set code

MJ-S000066


Overview

This major sequence provides students with an initial grounding in chemistry and builds towards specialised skills in materials chemistry (which involves the study and design of new materials) and electrochemistry (which deals with the interaction between electrical energy and chemical change).


Units

SLE210Chemistry the Enabling Science *

SLE214Organic Chemistry

SLE235Chemical Systems (Tri-3)

SLE212Biochemistry

SLE330Materials Chemistry

SLE338Electrochemistry for a Sustainable Future

* prerequisite unit applies (SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences)


 

Environmental Science

Campus

Burwood (Melbourne)


Unit set code

MJ-S000011


Overview

This major sequence focuses on the technical aspects of environmental science, and aims to provide a balance between environmental studies on the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere.


Units

SLE102Physical Geography

SLE239Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

SLE231Hydrology and Water Resources Management

SLE202Landscape Evolution

SHD301Creating Sustainable Futures

SLE322Landscape Ecology


 

Freshwater Biology

Campus

Warrnambool, Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000067


Overview

Freshwater biology is the study of freshwater ecosystems and the relationships between freshwater organisms and their physical and chemical environment. Focused on understanding and managing rivers, lakes and wetlands, you will develop the knowledge and skills to manage freshwater ecosystems and resources, whilst participating in fieldwork opportunities and industry placements. Offered as a major sequence within the Bachelor of Science, freshwater biology at Deakin focuses on real-world problem-solving, and addresses the challenges facing Australia’s freshwater systems.


Units

SLE263Marine and Coastal Ecosystems

SLE244Aquatic Ecology

SLE223Water Quality and Ecological Health

SLE348Freshwater Biology

SEV322Hydrology and Hydraulics

SLE304Geographic Information Systems: Uses in Aquatic Environments


 

Fisheries and Aquaculture

Campus

Warrnambool, Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000072


Overview

This major sequence provides you with comprehensive training in fisheries resource management, aquaculture management, and fisheries biology, with a focus on environmental sustainability, particularly renewable resource exploitation and culture of marine and freshwater species. You will learn about fisheries and aquaculture from a global perspective, including topics such as fish markets, nutrition and farm certification processes, the history of Australian fisheries, fisheries methods and impacts of fishing.


Units

SLE134Recreational Fisheries Science (Tri-3)

SLE262Aquaculture and the Environment

SLE261Diversity of Fishes

SLE217Aquaculture Nutrition and Seafood Quality ^

SLE329Aquatic Animal Health and Reproduction

SLE343Fisheries Management

^ available from 2018


 

Geography

Campuses

Burwood (Melbourne)


Unit set code

MJ-S000074


Overview

This major sequence is ideally suited to students with an interest in Geography including human as well as physical geography.


Units

SLE102Physical Geography

AIG103People and Place: An Introduction to Human Geography

SLE202Landscape Evolution

SLE237Biogeography (Tri-3)

SLE328Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

AIA301Australian Urban Geography: National and International Perspectives

Human Biology

Campuses

Burwood (Melbourne), Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000068


Overview

This major sequence enables you to discover how the body works and why it works that way through studies covering a broad range of areas relevant to human biology, including physiology and genetics, and their relationship to human disease.


Units

SLE132Biology: Form and Function

SLE254Genetics

SLE211Principles of Physiology

SLE221Systems Physiology

SLE323Advanced Topics in Biomedical Science

plus

SLE339Human Genetics or

SLE340Genomes and Bioinformatics


 

Mathematical Modelling

Campuses

Burwood (Melbourne), Cloud (online), Waurn Ponds (Geelong)


Unit set code

MJ-S000007


Overview

Studies in mathematical modelling provide you with a strong critical knowledge base and develops powers of analysis, logical thinking and problem solving, as well as a high level of numerical ability.


Units

SIT192Discrete Mathematics

SIT194Introduction to Mathematical Modelling

SIT291Mathematical Methods for Information Modelling

SIT292Linear Algebra for Data Analysis

SIT396Complex Analysis

SIT399Computational Decision Analysis


Mathematical Modelling sub-major sequence for E377 Bachelor of Health and Physical Education, D304 Bachelor of Science/Master of Teaching (Secondary), and pipelining D347 Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary)/Bachelor of Arts and D351 Bachelor of Teaching (Science)/Bachelor of Science students:

For students who have completed VCE Mathematical Methods 3 & 4

SIT192Discrete Mathematics

SIT194Introduction to Mathematical Modelling

SIT291Mathematical Methods for Information Modelling

SIT292Linear Algebra for Data Analysis

or

SIT281Cryptography


For students who have not completed VCE Mathematical Methods 3 & 4

SIT192Discrete Mathematics

SIT190Introductory Mathematical Methods

SLE251Research Methods and Data Analysis

SIT292Linear Algebra for Data Analysis

or

SIT281Cryptography

Natural History

Campus

Burwood (Melbourne)


Unit set code

MJ-S000069


Overview

Natural history involves the study of plants and animals in their natural environment, and leans more towards observational than experimental study methods. This major sequence emphasises the biological aspects of natural history, and includes studies in zoology, botany and palaeontology.


Units

SLE136Life On An Evolving Planet

SLE204Animal Diversity

SLE203Plant Biology

SLE237Biogeography (Tri-3)

SLE370Evolution

SLE395Palaeobiology


 

Plant Biology

Campus

Burwood (Melbourne)


Unit set code

MJ-S000070


Overview

This major sequence is ideally suited to those interested in botany and includes studies in plant morphology, identification, reproduction and evolution, as well as vegetation management and biogeography.


Units

SLE132Biology: Form and Function

SLE203Plant Biology

SLE237Biogeography (Tri-3)

SLE310Pest Plants and Animals

SLE317Australian Vegetation and Its Management

SLE370Evolution