Centre for Intelligent Systems Research

IEEE System of Systems Keynote speakers workshop

( Deakin University - 11 August 2006)

Air Commodore John Harvey

Professor Saeid Nahavand

Professor Mo Jamshidi (The University of Texas )

Professor Hugh Durrant-Whyte ( The University of Sydney )

Dr. Salah Sukkarieh ( The University of Sydney )

Professor Brian D O Anderson ( Australian National University )

Professor Ian Petersen ( Australian Defense Force Academy )

Professor Rob Evans ( University of Melbourne )

 

Opening:

Air Commodore John Harvey

(Director general, New Air Combat Capability)

Biography:

John Harvey

Air Commodore Harvey joined the RAAF in 1977 after completing a degree in Architecture at the University of New South Wales. He conducted navigator training at East Sale before being posted to Canberra aircraft at RAAF Amberley. After a four year tour on Canberra aircraft he spent one year as the escort officer to the Minister for Defence and then completed specialist weapons training and conversion training on the F-111.

After a three year flying tour of F-111s he completed the RAF Aerosystems course and returned to Australia for a three year posting in the Joint Intelligence Organisation. He was then posted to the United States as Flight Test Director of the F-111 Avionics Update Project, initially working with the USAF on the F-111 AMP.

On return from the United States he was posted to the Department of Defence as Air Warfare Adviser in Force Development and Analysis division. He subsequently completed a one year exchange posting with the Ministry of Defence New Zealand before being appointed as a Visiting Fellow at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. After the fellowship position he was posted as Director of the RAAF Air Power Studies Centre and then posted as Defence Attache Southern Europe, based in Rome and accredited to Italy, Israel, Greece and Turkey.

On return from Italy he was Deputy Director at the Australian Defence College and then Director of Military Strategy at Australian Defence Headquarters before being promoted and posted as Director General Aerospace Development. On 2 September 2002 he was posted as Director General New Air Combat Capability.

Air Commodore Harvey is married to Sue and has two daughters, Jo (15) and Mary (9). His hobbies include Tae Kwondo, swimming and backpacking. He has degrees in Architecture, Psychology and Information Science.



Professor Saeid Nahavandi (Deakin University)

Biography:

Saeid Nahavandi received BSc (Hons), MSc and a PhD in Control and Automation from Durham University (UK). In 1991 he joined Massey University (NZ) where he taught and led research in robotics and Intelligent Systems. In 1998 he joined Deakin University and now holds the Chair in Engineering. Professor Nahavandi is the leader for the Intelligent Systems research Lab. with 37 researchers.

Professor Nahavandi has been an active researcher in the area of Intelligent Systems since 1986. He won the title of Young Engineer of the Year for his novel intelligent robotic end effector in 1996. In 2002 Professor Nahavandi became Consultant to Jet Propulsion Lab (NASA) to report on the status of autonomous intelligent machines and associated systems analysis as conducted in the Pacific Rim . In 2003 he was an invited speaker at the 2003 BISC FLINT-CIBI International Joint Workshop on Soft Computing for Internet and Bioinformatics Frontiers - University of California at Berkeley . He was also Invited Speaker at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA, Pasadena , USA , July 2002 and Keynote Speaker at six international conferences including the IEEE International conference on DSP in Communication, Feb. 1999, Perth .

Professor Nahavandi has been awarded 9 ARC research grants in the past five years and several industry based research grants for a total of over $9.4 M. He received a major research contract from department of Defence (AU), managed by DSTO in 2006 to develop a Haptically Operated Counter-Explosive Platform for the Australian Army. He received the Research Collaboration / Initiatives Award from Japan (2000) and Prince & Princess of Wales Science Award in 1994. He is currently supervising 10 PhD students and previously supervised 12 PhD and 21 Masters to successful completion. He holds one patent on robotic end effector and was the designer of the control / electronics and drive system for the World's first largest (6x8 meters) 3-dimensional Intelligent Interactive Surface which appeared at the Hanover CIBIT International Electronics Trade Show in Germany in 2001.

Professor Nahavandi has published over 250 peer reviewed papers and is the recipient of four international awards in Engineering. He is a Fellow of Engineers Australia (FIEAust) and IEE (FIEE) and Member of IEEE.

Professor Nahavandi was the General Chair for the World Manufacturing Congress 97 (NZ), Co-Chair for International Symposium on Manufacturing with Applications (ISOMA 98, Alaska), Chair for the International Symposium on Manufacturing with Applications (ISOMA'2000, Hawaii), Co-Chair - The IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (IEEE ICIT 2001), General Chair - International Congress on Autonomous Intelligent Systems (2002, Deakin), Chair - ISOMA 2006, Budapest, Chair - 2006 IEEE Keynote Speakers Workshop, Deakin University.

Professor Nahavandi holds the position of IEEE Systems Journal (Member of the Board of Associate Editors), Editor for the International Journal Intelligent Automation and Soft Computing (South Pacific region) and International Journal of Computational Intelligence (Editorial Board member).

Some recent media appearances

TV

Appeared on Discovery Network International - 'One Step Beyond', Ep 10 'Bizarre', (2005)

News papers

The Australian, Tuesday 11 July 2006 - Warrior bots roll off to war

The Australian, Tuesday 20 June 2006 - Defence spreads its funds around to boost research

 

Keynote Title:

System of Systems - Definitions, Architecture, Simulation, and Applications

Professor Mo Jamshidi (The University of Texas )

Synopsis:

One of the main challenges of any related paradigms in systems engineering is being able to handle complex systems under unforeseen uncertainties. A system may be called complex if its dimension (order) is too high and its model (if available) is nonlinear, interconnected, and information on the system is uncertain such that classical techniques cannot easily handle the problem. One possible definition of system of systems (SoS) is an integration of complex systems coordinated together in such a way to achieve a wider goal with possible higher significance such as global warming, Mars missions, national air traffic control, intelligent transportation systems, etc. Computational intelligence or Soft Computing , a consortium of fuzzy logic (approximate reasoning), neuro-computing (learning), genetic algorithms and genetic programming (optimization), has proven to be a powerful set of tools for adding autonomy and semi-autonomy to many complex systems. In this presentation paradigms using soft computing approaches are utilized to design autonomous controllers for a number of space application. These applications are satellite array formations, robotic swarms, robotic agents and the Virtual Laboratory (V-LAB©) for multi-physics modeling and simulation. A brief view of the future activities of the NASA JPL for space exploration will also be given. SoS concepts will be described and a few test bed cases will be introduced, including a robotic swarm with dynamic sensor networks for national security. Some Animated and experimental implementation movies will be shown.

Biography:

Professor Mo M. Jamshidi (Fellow IEEE, Fellow ASME, Fellow AAAS, Fellow TWAS, Fellow NYAS) received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in February 1971. He holds three honorary doctorate degrees from Azerbaijan National University , Baku , Azerbaijan , 1999, University of Waterloo , Canada , 2004 and Technical University of Crete, Greece, 2004. Currently, he is the Lutcher Brown Endowed Chaired Professor at the University of Texas , San Antonio , TX , USA . He has also been the founding Director of Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) at the University of New Mexico , and has moved the Center to University of Texas , San Antonio in 2006. He is also the Regents Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the AT&T Professor Emeritus of Manufacturing Engineering at UNM. He was a Senior Research Advisor at US Air Force Research Laboratory, KAFB , NM from 2002-2005. He was also a consultant with US Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies on robotic automation effects on energy efficiency in 10 industries of the future from 2001-2004. He was also been an advisor for the NASA Headquarters Minority and Women-owned Business Utilization from 1998-2004. He was on the advisory board of the NASA JPL's Pathfinder Project mission, which landed on Mars on July 4, 1997 and a member of the NASA JPL Surface Systems Track Review Board. He was on the USA National Academy of Sciences NRC's Integrated Manufacturing and Ford Foundation Review Boards. Previously he spent 6 years at US Air Force Phillips (formerly Weapons) Laboratory working on large-scale systems, control of optical systems and adaptive optics. He has been a consultant with Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He has worked in various academic and industrial positions at various national and international locations including with IBM and GM Corporations. In 1999, he was a NATO Distinguished Professor in Portugal conducting lectures on intelligent systems and control. He has over 550 technical publications including 54 books and edited volumes. Six of his books have been translated into at least one foreign language. He is the Founding Editor or co-founding editor or Editor-in-Chief of 5 journals (including Elsevier's International Journal of Computers and Electrical Engineering Elsevier , UK , Intelligent Automation and Soft Computing, TSI Press , USA ) and one magazine ( IEEE Control Systems Magazine ). He is editor-in-chief of the new IEEE Systems Journal (to be inaugurated in 2007) and co-editor-in-Chief of the International Journal on Control and Automation . He has been or still is on the executive editorial boards of a number of journals and two encyclopedias. He was the series editor for ASME Press Series on Robotics and Manufacturing from 1988 to 1996 and Prentice Hall Series on Environmental and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems from 1991 to 1998. In 1986 he helped launch a specialized Symposium on robotics which was expanded to International Symposium on Robotics and Manufacturing (ISRAM) in 1988, and since 1994 it was expanded into World Automation Congress (WAC) where it now encompasses five main symposia and forum on Robotics, Manufacturing, Automation, Control, Soft Computing, Multimedia and Image Processing. He has been the General Chairman of WAC from its inception. Dr. Jamshidi is a Fellow of the IEEE for contributions to "Large-scale systems theory and applications and engineering education", a Fellow of the ASME for contributions to "Control of robotic and manufacturing systems," Fellow of the AAAS - the American Association for the Advancement of Science for contributions to "Complex large-scale systems and their applications to controls and optimization," a Fellow of Third World Academy of Sciences (Trieste, Italy), Member of Russian Academy of Nonlinear Sciences, Associate Fellow, Hungarian Academy of Engineering, a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and recipient of the IEEE Centennial Medal and IEEE Control Systems Society Distinguished Member Award and the IEEE CSS Millennium Award. He is currently on the Board of Governors of the IEEE Society on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. He is an Honorary Professor at three Chinese and one Australian Universities . In October 23005 he was awarded the IEEE SMC Society's Norbert Weiner Research Achievement Award.

Full Presentation

Keynote Title:

The Modelling, Design and Demonstration of "Systems of Autonomous System"

Professor Hugh Durrant-Whyte and Dr. Salah Sukkarieh ( The University of Sydney )

Synopsis:

The last decade has seen the successful implementation of field robots (autonomous outdoor vehicles and platforms such as UAVs, UGVs and AUVs) in both civilian and military circles. These "autonomous systems" have proven to be complex in their own right; linking aspects of control and statistical theory with software, hardware, mechanics, dynamics, and optimal algorithm development.

The success of single vehicle autonomous systems has naturally led researchers to inquire about how to model, understand, design, develop and demonstrate "Systems of Autonomous Systems". These comprise of many (possibly heterogeneous) autonomous systems interacting with one another (and possibly with humans) to achieve more complex mission goals (goals which may also change with time).

This talk will present the ongoing research and development work which has been conducted at the ACFR over the last decade, which focuses on the underlying algorithms that enable the development of systems of autonomous systems. In particular the focus of the talk will be on why particular algorithms were used, how these algorithms allowed for the modular and scalable development of systems of autonomous systems, and the demonstration of these algorithms on a multi-UAV test bed as well as on a complex heterogeneous system comprising of UAVs, UGVs and humans. The talk will present the current findings and on future directions within this exciting area.

Biography:

Hugh Durrant-Whyte received the B.Sc. in Nuclear Engineering from the University of London, U.K., in 1983, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees, both in Systems Engineering, from the University of Pennsylvania , U.S.A. , in 1985 and 1986, respectively. From 1987 to 1995, he was a Senior Lecturer in Engineering Science, the University of Oxford, U.K. and a Fellow of Oriel College Oxford. From 1995 to 2002 he was Professor of Mechatronic Engineering at University of Sydney . In 2002 he was awarded an inaugural Australian Research Council (ARC) Federation Fellowship. He also now leads the ARC Centre of Excellence in Autonomous Systems. His research work focuses on autonomous vehicle navigation and decentralised data fusion methods. His work in applications includes automation in cargo handling, mining, defence, and marine systems. He has published over 300 technical papers and has won numerous awards and prizes for his work.

Dr. Salah Sukkarieh is a leading research scientist in the area of autonomous field robotics with particular focus on cooperative autonomy in aerospace systems.

He obtained his PhD from the University of Sydney in 2000, and is currently the programme leader for the Systems programme at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Autonomous Systems and is the manager for Aerospace Systems at the Australian Centre for Field Robotics, the University of Sydney .

He is the Chief Investigator and Project Manager in a number of important government and industry sponsored projects funded by local and international agencies. These projects aim at developing and demonstrating advanced data fusion and control algorithms that enable "systems of autonomous systems" operations, and the modelling and design of these systems.

Dr. Sukkarieh has made a number of important contributions to the area with over 100 book chapter, journal and conference publications, and in 2004 won the Charles Sharpe Beecher Prize for contributions to the Aerospace Industry.

Full Presentation

Keynote Title:

Two Decades of Adaptive Control Pitfalls

Professor Brian D O Anderson ( Australian National University )

Synopsis:

Adaptive control is a very appealing technology, at least in principle. Yet its use has been conditioned by an attitude of distrustfulness on the part of some practitioners. In this talk, we review (without presupposing knowledge of adaptive control on the side of listeners) some concepts the isolation of which was necessary to engender confidence in the technology. These include the unpredictable failure of the so-called MIT rule; the bursting phenomenon, where an adaptive control loop can suddenly go unstable for a limited period, and how to prevent it; the notion that identification of a plant is only valid conceptually for a restricted range of controllers (with the implication that in adaptive control, certain controller changes may be hazardous); and the concept of multiple model adaptive control, which from some points of view raises as many the problems as it solves.

Brian Anderson was born in Sydney , Australia , and received his undergraduate education at the University of Sydney , with majors in pure mathematics and electrical engineering. He subsequently obtained a PhD degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University . Following completion of his education, he worked in industry in Silicon Valley and served as a faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford. He was Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Newcastle, Australia from 1967 until 1981 and is now a Distinguished Professor at the Australian National University . He was Director of the Research School of Information Sciences and Engineering at the ANU from 1994 to 2002 when he became interim CEO of National ICT Australia. From 2003 to 2006 he was Chief Scientist of National ICT Australia Ltd. He was a director of Cochlear Ltd from 1995 to 2005, and has served on the Prime Minister's Science Council under three prime ministers. His research interests are in control and signal processing. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, Royal Society London, Australian Academy of Science, Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Engineers, Australia , and Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Engineering. He holds doctorates (honoris causa) from the Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium , Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Universities of Sydney, Melbourne , New South Wales and Newcastle . He served a term as President of the International Federation of Automatic Control from 1990 to 1993 and as President of the Australian Academy of Science between 1998 and 2002. His awards include the Quazza Medal of IFAC in 1999, the IEEE Control Systems Award of 1997, the 2001 IEEE James H Mulligan, Jr Education Medal, and the Guillemin-Cauer Award, IEEE Circuits and Systems Society in 1992 and 2001, the Bode Prize of the IEEE Control System Society in 1992 and the Senior Prize of the IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing in 1986.

Full Presentation

Keynote Title:

A Kalman Decomposition for Robustly Unobservable  Uncertain Linear Systems

Professor Ian Petersen ( Australian Defence Force Academy )

Synopsis:

We consider the structure of uncertain linear systems building on a concept of  robust unobservability. We consider the case of linear time invariant uncertain systems with unstructured uncertainty described by an averaged integral quadratic constraint. Also, we presents a characterization of  the robustly unobservable states and shows that this leads to a  Kalman type decomposition for uncertain linear systems with robustly unobservable states.

Ian R. Petersen was born in Victoria , Australia . He received a Ph.D in Electrical Engineering in 1984 from the University of Rochester . From 1983 to 1985 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Australian National University . In 1985 he joined the School of Electrical Engineering , University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy and he is currently a Full Professor. He served as the Executive Director for Mathematics, Information and Communication for the Australian Research Council from 2002-2004. He was also Acting Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research) for the University of New South Wales in 2004. He has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control and Systems and Control Letters. Currently he is an Editor for Automatica and and an Associate Editor for SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.  His research interests are in robust control theory and its applications, robust filtering and state estimation, nonlinear control, optimal control, and quantum control.

Full Presentation

Keynote Title:

Title: Information Theory for Dynamical Systems

Professor Rob Evans ( University of Melbourne )

Synopsis:

Systems theory and its close relative feedback control theory both began to establish solid foundations around 75 years ago with the work of Black, Nyquist  and Von Bertalanffy. This initial work was followed by Bode's mathematical basis for feedback, the introduction of information theory by Claude Shannon, the qualitative synthesis of information and feedback theory by Norbert Wiener in his cybernetics, and the seminal work of W. Ross Ashby and Herbert Simon. In the past 50 years information theory, general systems theory, and feedback control theory have all developed in an essentially independent manner.  Most researchers working in these areas believe that a proper and rigorous synthesis of these disciplines will lead to significant advances in our ability to understand and affect the behaviour of complex systems. This talk will examine the current state of affairs and describe recent advances in the synthesis of feedback control theory, information theory and interconnected systems.

Rob Evans was born in Melbourne , Australia , in 1947. After completing a BE degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of Melbourne in 1969, he worked as a radar systems engineering officer with the Royal Australian Airforce. He completed a PhD in 1975 at the University of Newcastle followed by postdoctoral studies at the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, MIT , USA and the Control and Management Department, Cambridge University , UK .

In 1977 he took up an academic position at the University of Newcastle, where he was Head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 1986 - 1991, and Co-Director of the Centre on Industrial Control Systems between 1988 - 1991.

In 1992 he moved to the University of Melbourne , where he was Head of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering until 1996. He was Research Leader for the Cooperative Centre for Sensor Signal and Information Processing until 2000 and Director of the Centre for Networked Decision Systems until 2004. He is currently Director of the Victoria Research Laboratory of National ICT Australia.

He has worked extensively with industry in Australia and overseas over the past 30 years. He has been closely involved with the development of a number of telecommunications and target tracking systems and products for industry. Projects include the development of variable speed AC drives, development of star and satellite servo tracking systems for large antennae now installed in many countries, large fault-tolerant SCADA systems, etc. He has extensive experience in the design and implementation of both hardware and software for industrial real-time embedded microprocessor systems. He was Director of Technology for TUNRA Industrial Electronics from 1983-1992.

He has served on many national and international committees. He has served on a number of Government and Academy committees. He was a founding member of the Asian Control Conference Steering Committee, co-chair of the international program committee for the 1993 IFAC World Conference, General Chair of the 2003 International Data Fusion Conference, General Chair of the 2004 Asian Control Conference, and has been a member of the program committees of around 50 international conferences. He was chair of the ARC Engineering 2 panel from 1994-1996. He is currently a member of the Council of the International Federation for Automatic Control.

His research has ranged across many areas including theory and applications in industrial control, radar systems, signal processing and telecommunications. He has published around 400 research papers and supervised more than 45 PhD students in these areas. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (FAA), a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (FTSE), a Fellow of the Institution of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, USA (FIEEE) and Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia (FIEAust).

Full Presentation

 

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27th March 2012