The Visual in Education Research Symposium

4-5 October 2012
Deakin University, Melbourne City Centre

Background Program Information Keynote Speaker Symposium Sponsors Registration Enquiries

Background

The visual is becoming increasingly central to thinking across a range of disciplines. Our awareness of the impact of the image in thinking, communicating and being is increasing as theoretical positions on the role of the visual in a range of areas become increasingly sophisticated. In education research, the visual is emerging as central to a variety of methodologies dealing with ethnographies, with spatial relations, with capture of environments, and with cognition. In this symposium, researchers from Deakin and other institutions who are working in this visual field will present 'provocations' to stimulate discussion on each of these perspectives. The intention is to explore the ways in which these differing approaches to the visual might speak to each other in productive ways.

It is expected that academic researchers and higher degree research students will gain from the symposium.

Please encourage your higher degree students to come even if you cannot attend.

Program Information

Each speaker will talk for 15 minutes, offering a provocation which describes their thinking/research around visual methods, raising questions designed to stimulate discussion on the symposium theme. Each session will comprise 50 minutes of discussion around these provocations. The titles of the provocations:
Julianne Moss, Deakin University: The double bind
Kim Senior, Deakin University: Graphic narratives and 'whimsical sketches' of pedagogy
David Clarke, University of Melbourne: Video - Window, Lens or Distorting Mirror?
Gaye Williams, Deakin University: Can visual images contribute to 'windows' into the mind? How and with what limitations?
Peter Hubber, Deakin University: How central is the visual to capturing science teachers' practice?
Jill Loughlin, Deakin University: Photography as field notes - researchers as educational tourists
Mary Dixon, Deakin University: Pedascapes - images and maps in large-scale pedagogy research
Vaughan Prain, Latrobe University: Knowing and representing
James McArdle, Deakin University Visual Arts: Relating visual making and thinking: can the processes of making and doing represent understanding or create knowledge across disciplines?

Draft Program

Thursday 4 October

2:30

Registration, afternoon tea

3:00

Russell Tytler
Introduction and provocation

3:20

Small group discussion: raising questions

3:45

Associate Professor Eric Margolis
Keynote Speaker

5:00

Dinner TBC

Friday 5 October

8:30

Registration

9:00 The use of the visual to interpret school cultures
Julianne Moss, Kim Senior

10:25

Coffee and morning tea

10:40

Visual capture and interpretation of classrooms
David Clarke, Gaye Williams, Peter Hubber

12:15

Lunch

1:00

 

Flexible learning spaces and the visual
Jill Loughlin, Mary Dixon

2:25 Coffee

2:35

Visual reasoning and cognition
Vaughan Prain, James McArdle

4:00

Response: Eric Margolis

4:30

Where to next? Jill Blackmore

5:00

Symposium ends

Keynote Speaker

Eric
Associate Professor Eric Margolis

Eric Margolis is a Sociologist and Associate Professor in The Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. He is President of the International Visual Sociology Association. His scholarly interests have included the politics and hidden curricula of higher education, visual research methods in general and visual ethnography in particular. His most recent book is The Sage Handbook of Visual Research co-edited with Luc Pauwels. (Sage Publications, London, 2011). An edited book, The Hidden Curriculum in Higher Education, was published by Routledge in 2001 and; The Blackwell Companion to Social Inequalities, edited with Mary Romero was published in 2005. Recent articles include "School as Ceremony and Ritual: How Photography Illuminates Moments of Ideological Transfer" with Drew Chappell and Sharon Chappell. Qualitative Inquiry 17:1, 2011. "Architectural and Built Environment Discourses in an Educational Context: The Gottscho and Schleisner Collection" with Sheila Fram, Visual Studies 26:3 pp. 229-243. Forthcoming is "The Changing Hidden Curricula: A Personal Recollection" in Contemporary Colleges & Universities: A Reader edited by Joseph L. Devitis, Peter Lang Publishers, 2012

Symposium Sponsors

Sponsored by the Centre for Research in Educational Futures and Innovation in conjunction with the STEME Research Group

Center for Educational Futures and Innovation (CREFI)

Registration

Register NOW please note there is no confirmation email sent through this online system however the system does prompt you to print a receipt.

Full registration $120
Students not in full-time employment $60
The registration fee includes morning and afternoon teas, and lunch.

Free 'Arts and Education staff and full time PhD students, invited speakers' however you DO need to register online. Note: Please click Confirm and Pay by Credit Card when prompted. This is necessary in order to secure your place. At no point will Deakin Staff or Speakers be required to enter your credit card details and be charged for this event.

The closing date for registration has been extended to 17 September 2012
Enquiries: Terri-Ann Varga

Venue

Deakin University Melbourne City Centre
Level 3, 550 Bourke Street
Melbourne, Victoria 3000
Ph: +61 3 9918 9000

Parking
Earlybird parking requires you to be in before 9am and to leave after 3pm and is located in Gresham Street. The Cost is $19.
Please note there is no public parking in 550 Bourke Street.

Lifts
In the lobby press 3 on the key pads outside of the lift and the screen will advise of the lift to enter.
There are NO buttons in the actual lift.

Public Transport
You can catch the train to the Southern Cross or Flinders Street Station.
Journey Planner

Enquiries

Lisa Angelini
CREFI Co-ordinator
Centre for Research in Educational Futures and Innovation
Faculty of Arts and Education
221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Vic, 3125
Ph: + 61 3 92517147
Email: lisa.angelini@deakin.edu.au


 


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