Strategic Research Centres

Want good health?

Mon, 19 Sep 2011 16:56:00 +1000

A Deakin University seminar in November will be told that Vitamin D is a De-lightful way to have good health.

One of the keynote speakers is Professor Michael Holick, a world-leading expert in the study of Vitamin D.

Professor Michael F. Holick, PhD, MD, is Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics; Director of the General Clinical Research Unit; and Director of the Bone Health Care Clinic and the Director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center.

He has made many contributions to the field of the biochemistry, physiology, metabolism, and photobiology of vitamin D for human nutrition.

As a graduate student he was the first to identify the major circulating form of vitamin D in human blood as 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. He then isolated and identified the active form of vitamin D as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.  He participated in the first 21 step chemical synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 that was used in the first clinical trials to treat renal osteodystrophy and inborn and acquired disorders in vitamin D metabolism including pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets.

He determined the mechanism for how vitamin D is synthesized in the skin, demonstrated the effects of aging, obesity, latitude, seasonal change, sunscreen use, skin pigmentation, and clothing on this vital cutaneous process.

Other speakers at the seminar will be Deakin University Professor Caryl Nowson and Dr Rob Daly.

Click here to find out more.


Professor Michael Holick
Professor Michael Holick
Showcase facts
  • Professor Holick participated in the first 21 step chemical synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 that was used in the first clinical trials to treat renal osteodystrophy and inborn and acquired disorders in vitamin D metabolism including pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets.
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Mandi O'Garretty
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17th May 2011