Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science

Undergraduate degree

Study zoology and animal science to learn about the form and function of different animals and how they adapt to their natural environment.

Research-informed teaching from leaders in the field

Apply theory to living subjects in labs

Build industry experience through work placements

Key facts

ATAR

Waurn Ponds:
65.3
Lowest selection rank

Duration

3 years full-time or part-time equivalent

Key dates

Direct applications to Deakin for Trimester 1 2020 close 23 February 2020
Late VTAC entry closes 1 November 2019 at 5pm. View other VTAC dates

Current Deakin Students

To access your official course details for the year you started your degree, please visit the handbook

Course information

Deakin’s Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science lets you get hands-on with animals, big and small. Apply the latest zoology theory and research in real-world settings, and develop evidence-based decision-making skills valued by industry.

Interested in a career that cares for the future of our furry and feathered friends?

If you’re fascinated by the way animals behave, adapt, evolve and survive, you’re not alone. Animal enthusiasts choose Deakin to turn their passion into a rewarding career because of our research-informed teaching and practical approach to learning.
You’ll be challenged to test the theories you discuss in the classroom on living subjects in the lab and field. This gives you a first-hand understanding of the form and function of animals and the underlying mechanisms that influence their ecology and evolution.This course has a strong focus on Australian fauna and its unique importance in the global environment. You will learn broadly about

how animal evolution and ecology respond to changing environments.
As you advance through the course, you’ll be exposed to many unique aspects of zoology including disease ecology, animal sensory neurobiology and behaviour, as well as ecological and conservation genetics. The wide range of core units will broaden your skill set, expanding your career options across the growing zoology and animal science field.

As important as what you learn is how you'll learn it. Start preparing for your future career by undertaking a discipline-specific industry work placement, and study animals, working alongside academic staff who aren’t just teachers, but researchers at the forefront of their respective fields.
Units in the course may include assessment hurdle requirements.

Read More

Course structure

To complete the Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science, students must attain 24 credit points. Most units (think of units as ‘subjects’) are equal to 1 credit point. So that means in order to gain 24 credit points, you’ll need to study 24 units (AKA ‘subjects’) over your entire degree. Most students choose to study 4 units per trimester, and usually undertake two trimesters each year.

The course comprises a total of 24 credit points, which must include the following:

  • 17 credit points of core (prescribed) units
  • 7 credit points of electives (which can be taken from any area of the University, or can be used to specialise in another area)
  • Completion of STP050 Academic Integrity (0-credit point compulsory unit)
  • Completion of SLE010 Laboratory and Fieldwork Safety Induction Program (0-credit point compulsory unit)
  • Completion of STP010 Career Tools for Employability (0-credit point compulsory unit)
  • No more than 10 credit points at level 1
  • At least 6 level 3 units

Students are required to meet the University's academic progress and conduct requirements. Click here for more information.

18

Core units

6

Elective units

24

Total units

Core

Level 1 - Trimester 1

  • Academic Integrity STP050 (0 credit points)
  • Cells and Genes SLE111
  • Ecology and the Environment SLE103
  • Chemistry in Our World SLE133 ^ or one elective unit
  • plus one elective unit

    Level 1 - Trimester 2

  • Biology: Form and Function SLE132
  • Physics for the Life Sciences SLE123
  • Chemistry for the Professional Sciences SLE155 ^ or one elective unit
  • plus one elective unit

    ^Note: Students must complete at least one Chemistry unit (SLE133 Chemistry in Our World or SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences). Students who have not completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE133 Chemistry in Our World in Trimester 1.  Students who have completed Year 12 Chemistry or equivalent may choose to do SLE155 Chemistry for the Professional Sciences in Trimester 2.


    Level 2 - Trimester 1

  • Laboratory and Fieldwork Safety Induction Program SLE010 (0 credit points)
  • Animal Diversity SLE204
  • Research Methods and Data Analysis SLE251
  • Marine Biology SLE238
  • plus one elective unit

    Level 2 - Trimester 2

  • Vertebrate Structure and Function SLE205
  • Genetics and Genomics SLE254
  • Animal Behaviour SLE224
  • plus one elective unit

    Level 2 - Trimester 3

  • Zoological Field Studies SLE355 (Tri-3)

  • Level 3 - Trimester 1

  • Professional Practice SLE301 ^
  • Ecological and Conservation Genetics SLE341
  • Evolution SLE370
  • Sensory Neurobiology and Behaviour SLE397
  • Level 3 - Trimester 2

  • Disease Ecology and Epidemiology SLE354
  • plus two elective units

    ^ Must have successfully completed STP010 Career Tools for Employability (0-credit point unit)

    Electives

    Select from the range of elective units offered across many courses, including, in some cases, the option to choose elective units from a completely different field (subject to meeting unit requirements).

    It is important to note that some elective units may include compulsory placement, study tours, work-based training or collaborative research training arrangements.

    Key information

    Award granted
    Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science
    Year

    2020 course information

    VTAC code
    1400315481 - Waurn Ponds (Geelong), Commonwealth Supported Place (HECS)
    Deakin code
    S369
    CRICOS code?
    075365F
    Level
    Undergraduate
    Approval status
    This course is approved by the University under the Higher Education Standards Framework.
    Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) recognition
    The award conferred upon completion is recognised in the Australian Qualifications Framework at Level 7.

    Campuses by intake

    Campus availability varies per trimester. This means that a course offered in Trimester 1 may not be offered in the same location for Trimester 2 or 3. Read more to learn where this course will be offered throughout the year.

    Trimester 1 - March

    • Start date: March
    • Available at:
      • Waurn Ponds (Geelong)

    Trimester 2 - July

    • Start date: July
    • Available at:
      • Waurn Ponds (Geelong)

    Deakin splits the academic year into three terms, known as trimesters. Most students usually undertake two trimesters each year (March-June, July-November).

    Additional course information

    Course duration - additional information

    Course duration may be affected by delays in completing course requirements, such as accessing or completing work placements.

    Mandatory student checks

    Any unit which contains work integrated learning, a community placement or interaction with the community may require a police check, Working with Children Check or other check.

    Workload

    You can expect to participate in a range of teaching activities each week. This could include classes, seminars, practicals and online interaction. You can refer to the individual unit details in the course structure for more information. You will also need to study and complete assessment tasks in your own time.

    Participation requirements

    Students are required to complete units in Trimester 3.

    Work experience

    The course includes a compulsory professional practice unit that requires you to undertake at least 80 hours of work experience in a course-related host organisation. deakin.edu.au/sebe/wil.

    Elective units may also provide additional opportunities for Work Integrated Learning experiences.

    Need help?

    Ask a question about studying a at Deakin

    Entry requirements

    Entry information

    Deakin University offers admission to undergraduate courses through a number of Admission categories.

    All applicants must meet the minimum English language requirements.

    Please note that meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee selection, which is based on merit, likelihood of success and availability of places in the course.

    For more information on the Admission Criteria and Selection (Higher Education Courses) Policy visit the Deakin Policy Library

    Entry for applicants with recent secondary education (previous three years) will be based on their performance in a Senior Secondary Certificate of Education, with pre-requisite units 3 and 4; a study score of at least 25 in English EAL (English as an additional language) or 20 in English other than EAL. Applicants will be selected in accordance with the published Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) for that year.

    Refer to the VTAC Guide for the latest pre-requisite information www.vtac.edu.au

    Entry for applicants with previous Tertiary, VET, life or work experience will be based on their performance in:

    • a Certificate IV in a related discipline OR
    • a Diploma in any discipline or 50% completion of a Diploma in a related discipline OR
    • successful completion of relevant study at an accredited higher education institution equivalent to at least two Deakin University units OR
    • other evidence of academic capability judged to be equivalent for example relevant work or life experience

    Admissions information

    Learn more about this course and others that Deakin offers by visiting VTAC for more information. You can also discover how Deakin compares to other universities when it comes to the quality of our teaching and learning by visiting the QILT website.

    Learn more about Deakin's special entry access scheme (SEAS - a way to help boost your ATAR in some circumstances).

    You can also find out about different entry pathways into Deakin courses if you can't get in straight from high school.

    Finally, Deakin is committed to admissions transparency. As part of that commitment, you can learn more about our first intake of 2019 students (PDF, 746.6KB) - their average ATARs, whether they had any previous higher education experience and more.

    Recognition of prior learning

    The University aims to provide students with as much credit as possible for approved prior study or informal learning which exceeds the normal entrance requirements for the course and is within the constraints of the course regulations. Students are required to complete a minimum of one-third of the course at Deakin University, or four credit points, whichever is the greater. In the case of certificates, including graduate certificates, a minimum of two credit points within the course must be completed at Deakin.

    You can also refer to the Recognition of Prior Learning System which outlines the credit that may be granted towards a Deakin University degree and how to apply for credit.

    Fees and scholarships

    Fee information

    Estimated tuition fee - full-fee paying place
    Not applicable
    Estimated tuition fee - (CSP)?
    $9,320 for 1 yr full-time - Commonwealth Supported Place (HECS)
    Learn more about fees.

    The tuition fees you pay will depend on the units you choose to study as each unit has its own costs. The 'Estimated tuition fee' is provided as a guide only based on a typical enrolment of students undertaking the first year of this course. The cost will vary depending on the units you choose, your study load, the time it takes to complete your course and any approved Recognition of Prior Learning you have.

    Each unit you enrol in has a credit point value. The 'Estimated tuition fee' is calculated by adding together 8 credit points of a typical combination of units for that course. Eight credit points is used as it represents a typical full-time enrolment load for a year.

    You can find the credit point value of each unit under the Unit Description by searching for the unit in the Handbook.

    Learn more about fees and available payment options.

    Scholarship options

    A Deakin scholarship could help you pay for your course fees, living costs and study materials. If you've got something special to offer Deakin - or maybe you just need a bit of extra support - we've got a scholarship opportunity for you. Search or browse through our scholarships

    Apply now

    How to apply

    Apply through VTAC

    Applications to VTAC are now open for recent secondary education graduates, including current Year 12 students. Learn about the steps involved and how to complete your preference list for study in 2020.


    Apply direct to Deakin

    Applications can be made directly to the University through the Course and Scholarship Applicant Portal.


    Need more information on how to apply?

    For more information on the application process and closing dates, visit the how to apply page.

    How to apply


    Register your interest to study at Deakin

    Please complete the Register your interest form to receive further information about our direct application opportunities.


    Entry pathways

    View pathways into the Bachelor of Zoology and Animal Science with our pathways finder.

    Contact information

    Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment
    School of Life and Environmental Sciences
    deakin.edu.au/life-environmental-sciences

    Prospective student enquiries
    Are you looking to apply for this course or would like further information?
    Call 1800 693 888 or email us at myfuture@deakin.edu.au
    Enquire online

    Current student course and enrolment enquiries
    Call 03 9244 6699 or email us at sebe-enquire@deakin.edu.au
    Submit an online enquiry

    Frequently asked questions

    Deakin runs on trimesters, what dates do they each start?

    Find out more about our key dates

    Am I eligible for a scholarship with this course?

    Find our more about scholarships at Deakin

    Can I claim recognition of prior learning (RPL) for this course?

    Find out more about RPL

    Where can I study with Deakin?

    Find out more about campus locations

    Why choose Deakin

    Want a degree that’s more than just a qualification? Our industry connections, world-class facilities and practical approach to learning are just some of the reasons why Deakin students graduate confident and ready to thrive in the jobs of tomorrow.

    Top 1% of universities worldwide*

    Learn from teachers at the forefront of research in their field

    Work with animals in labs and put theory into practice

    Build a professional network through industry-based placements

    Career outcomes

    Employers value Deakin graduates’ range of practical experience and evidence-based decision-making skills. You’ll be well-placed to explore opportunities in areas including:

    • zoological research
    • environmental monitoring and management
    • wildlife biology
    • private environmental consulting
    • government quarantine.

    Graduates typically take on roles such as:

    • research assistants
    • environmental managers
    • pest management officers
    • collection managers of aquaria and zoological gardens
    • primary and secondary teachers (with relevant teaching qualifications).

    Further postgraduate studies, including research training either in Australia or overseas, can also lead to becoming a research scientist in a specific field, museum curator or even a university academic.

    Course learning outcomes

    Deakin's graduate learning outcomes describe the knowledge and capabilities graduates can demonstrate at the completion of their course. These outcomes mean that regardless of the Deakin course you undertake, you can rest assured your degree will teach you the skills and professional attributes that employers value. They'll set you up to learn and work effectively in the future.

    Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes

    Course Learning Outcomes

    Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities

    Apply a broad and coherent knowledge of chemistry, zoology and their environment to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of scientific concepts and methods in the study of zoology and animal science.  Apply technical knowledge and skills and use them in a range of activities, in a professional setting; this application of technical knowledge and skills being characterised by demonstrable in-depth knowledge of scientific methods and tools; and demonstrable proficiency in the utilisation of scientific facts, principles and practices.  Demonstrate an integrated knowledge, autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility to investigate, test, analyse, and evaluate scientific data and to argue about characteristics and aspects of scientific theories in the advancement of zoology and animal science.

    Communication

    Use oral, written, graphical and interpersonal communication skills to accommodate, encourage, and answer audience questions in a professional manner.  Present details of scientific procedures, key observations, results and conclusions using appropriate scientific language and conventions to share and disseminate information and knowledge in a clear and coherent manner.

    Digital literacy

    Apply well-developed scientific information literacy skills to independently locate, interpret, evaluate the merits of, and synthesise information in a digital world using an advanced working knowledge of relevant bibliographic software applications.  Reflect on, create and ethically share knowledge and information to a variety of audiences to demonstrate the ability to adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts.

    Critical thinking

    Locate and evaluate scientific information from multiple sources and use scientific methods and frameworks to structure and plan observations, experimentation or fieldwork investigations.  Use critical and analytical thinking and judgement to analyse, synthesise and generate an integrated knowledge, formulate hypotheses and test them against evidence-based scientific concepts and principles in the field of zoology and animal science.

    Problem solving

    Use initiative and creativity in planning, identifying and using multiple approaches to recognise, clarify, construct and solutions to real world (authentic) problems in zoology and animal science.  Advocate scientific methodologies, hypotheses, laws, facts and principles to create solutions to authentic real world problems in zoology and animal science taking into account relevant contextual factors.

    Self-management

    Take personal, professional and social responsibility within changing professional science contexts to develop autonomy as learners and evaluate own performance.  Work autonomously, responsibly, ethically and safely to solve unstructured problems and actively apply knowledge of regulatory frameworks and scientific methodologies to make informed choices.

    Teamwork

    Work independently and collaboratively as a team to contribute towards achieving team goals and thereby demonstrate interpersonal skills including the ability to brainstorm, negotiate, resolve conflicts, managing difficult and awkward conversations, provide constructive feedback and work in diverse professional, social and cultural contexts.

    Global citizenship

    Apply scientific knowledge and skills with a high level of autonomy, judgement, responsibility and accountability in collaboration with others to articulate the place and importance of zoology and animal science in the local and global context.

    Approved by Faculty Board 27 June 2019

    *ARWU Rankings 2018
    ^Mid-year intake is not available for all courses and some courses have limited places, apply early to avoid missing out.

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